Fair Play; 1897 (Jan 2 – Dec 25)

Fair Play, January 2, 1897

Died, at Bloomsdale, on Friday, December 25, 1896, the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Amos Carron.

Philip Murphy, who lived about five miles east of Farmington, in Ste. Genevieve county, died Tuesday night, the 22nd, of pneumonia, aged about 22 years.--Times.

Mrs. John Drury died at her home at Bloomsdale last Sunday morning, December 26th, at the age of 71 years.

A telegram was received here Wednesday announcing the death of Mrs. Simon A. Guignon, who died in St. Louis Wednesday morning, December 30, at the age of 82 years. The remains were brought to Ste. Genevieve Thursday and interred in the Valle Spring Catholic cemetery on Friday.

Mr. E. Delpy of this city and Miss Mary Lou Dupont of Ste. Genevieve, Mo., were married on December 17th at 8 P.M. The bride is a handsome and accomplished young lady, and Mr. Delpy is one of Thayer’s most successful business men. We join the many friends of the happy pair in wishing them a long and happy married life.--Thayer, Mo., Tribune.

The new iron bridge over the Valle Spring Branch on the St. Mary’s road was opened to traffic week before last, the approaches having been properly filled. This work was satisfactorily done by Mr. William Kern, the overseer who treated the boys with some beer after the job was completed. The beerwas drank on the new bridge and the old one, being unsafe, has been nailed up.

J Ad Rozier.

New Orleans Picayune, Dec. 21.

J. Ad. Rozier, Esq, died yesterday morning at his home in this city at the age of seventy-nine years. His death was due more to dissolution of the energies of his once splendid constitution than to any local or specific cause, and surrounded by his children and by devoted friends he passed quietly from this world to the one where one awaited him who had been the partner of his early hopes, his manhood’s successes and his age’s decline until a few years ago, when she went before to welcome him to his eternal home.

Mr. Rozier was one of the most prominent lawyers at the local bar, and had he choosen could have been a conspicuous figure in Louisiana politics. He chose, however, the quieter paths of private life, and the prominence which he enjoyed was  the community’s recognition of his personal ability and his knowledge of the law. To him it was not merely a system of negatives, penalties and technicalities. It was philosophy, freighted in its every phrase with the ethics and morals of civilization.

Unflattered because of official position and title, Mr. Rozier’s circle of friends and admirers were men who were drawn to him for what he himself was, and their esteem and affection were to him the highest honors which man could win outside the close circle of his own family.

Mr. Rozier was born in Ste. Genevieve, Mo, Dec. 30, 1817. He thus lacked but seventeen days of being seventy-nine years old at his death. Born of a family of French descent and high standing, his birthright was culture and intelligence, and he was a worthy descendant of those whose blood flowed in his veins.

Young Rozier began the study of law under Judge Nathanuel Pope of the United States District Court of Illinois, and later read under Judge John Scott, a noted jurist of Ste. Genevieve. He went to Paris, where he studied French law and then came to New Orleans, whose bar was the most famous in the country. He settled here in 1839, and was admitted to the bar in 1840, being twenty-three years of age at the time.

Mr. Rozier’s knowledge of French law, of course, assisted him greatly in his practice here under laws founded on the Napoleonic system, and he rose speedily to a prominent position in the list of eminent Louisiana jurists. Learned in the intricacies of the law, he was also a clear debator and an orator of no mean ability, and to him fell the signal honor of delivering the eulogy over the body of Christian Roselius.

Mr. Rozier was one of the five members of the secession convention who refused to sign the act of secession, and the only one who spoke for the Union in the convention. His opposition to the war was not due to abolition tendencies, but because of his abiding faith that the Union should be preserved at whatever cost.

Because of this Gen. Shelpley appointed him on the Board of Administrators of the Charity Hospital in  1862 and in 1865 Gen Canby appointed him Mayor of New Orleans, which position he filled for a few months. When Lincoln was elected President the second time he tendered Mr. Rozier the office of United States District Attorney, which he declined.

Throughout his life Mr. Rozier was a democrat, and in 1880 Gov. Wiltz tendered him a seat on the Supreme bench of this State. This offer, also, he declined, preferring to remain in private life.

At the age of thirty Mr. Rozier married Miss Clotilda Valle of Ste. Genevieve, Mo. She died five years ago. About a year later Mr. Rozier’s health began to fail and he retired from practice.

The deceased leaves three children, all residents of this city. He leaves one son, Hon. V. J. Rozier, who was judge of the First City Court from 1888 to 1892 and assistant city attorney from 1892 until recently, and two daughters, Misses Katie and Clotilde Rozier.

The interment will be at 10 o’clock this morning in Metairie (?) Cemetery the following gentlemen serving as pall-bearers: Mr. Justice McEnery, Judge E. T. Merrick, Judge Joshua G. Baker of the Criminal District Court’ Judge George H. Theard of the Civil District Court; Dr. E W Jones and Messrs. Archibald W. Carter, William Grant and James Jackson.

State Senator Yancey of Piedmont accidentally shot his left hand off while hunting turkey. He was alone in the woods at the time and was compelled to walk four miles before receiving any attention.

Phil Gordon, one of the men arrested for the robbery of Mr. J. B. Dines, has made a confession. Mr. Dines offered a reward of one half the money for its recovery, and Pink McCarver, after Gordon was arrested, worked on the latter’s wife and succeeded in securing a confession from her that her husband did the robbing. He then persuaded her to come to Farmington with him, and in his and the wife’s presence at the jail Gordon acknowledged the truthfulness of his wife’s story and told where the money was hidden, part of it in a hay stack and part under a certain rock. Mr. McCarver made a search and found the money, all but a few dollars. Mr. Dines promptly turned over one-half the amount as a reward.--Farmington Times.

Engine No 691 of the Iron Mountain Railway, blew up at Gad’s Hill at 4 o’clock Saturday while on the siding, killing engineer P. H. Fitzgerald and brakeman Frank Isby, both residents of DeSoto.  J. Brady, fireman, was badly injured, and was sent to the Missouri Pacific hospital. The engine had been out of the shop about three weeks.

Fair Play, January 9, 1897

The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Irving Byington died on Monday of this week.

John Senerich of Marceline, Mo., brother of Louis Senerich of this city, was seriously hurt while at work in a coal mine on Wednesday, December 30th. He was struck on the hip by a large piece of coal and it is feared he will be crippled for life.

The five year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Gisi of River aux Vases died on Thursday morning, January 7, 1897, of diphtheria.

George M. Thomure of St. Louis, son of Engineer George Thomure of this city, was married in St. Louis on December 31, 1896, to Miss L. Du Rux.

Married, on Wednesday, January 6, 1897, at the residence of Lawrence Herzog, St. Mary’s, ‘Squire Mattingly officiating, Miss Mary Doll and Mr. Wm. Bell, both of Ste. Genevieve. The grooms men were Henry Herzog, John Burnett and Joseph Schmidt, and Misses Emma Lalumondiere, Rosa Doll and Belle Moser were bridesmaids. A wedding supper was served at the Doll place, about six miles south of Ste. Genevieve and dancing was indulged in until early Thursday morning.

The remains of Mrs. Carmelite M. Guignon, who died in St. Louis on Wednesday morning, December 30, 1896, were brought to Ste. Genevieve Thursday evening and interred in the Valle Spring Catholic cemetery  Saturday morning after a funeral high mass had been sung by Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout. She had been ill since Thanksgiving Day, but was not considered dangerously so until two weeks previous to her death. Mrs. Guignon, whose maiden name was Carmelite M. Bossier, was born in Ste. Genevieve on September 29, 1814, and was therefore eighty-two years and three months old at the time of her death. On November 13, 1832, she was married to Mr. Simon A Guignon, who died in this city on May 19, 1891. Ten children were born to this union, five of whom survived: Louis B., Joseph F, Jules B., Conrad P., and Emile S., all residents of St. Louis and East St. Louis. Her children were all present at the funeral.

Staabtown News.

The latest arrival was a little stranger of the feminine persuasion, at the residence of C. A. Rudloff on Saturday the 2nd inst.

Fair Play, January 16, 1897

The nine year old daughter of Mr. Alfred Lalumondiere of River aux Vases died on Wednesday, January 14th, of typhoid fever.

Arannah Murphy, aged 17, living in Union township, Ste. Genevieve county, died Sunday of pneumonia, and was buried on Monday. His brother died about two weeks ago of the same sickness.--Farmington Herald.

Died, on Tuesday, January 12, at the home of her son-in-law, Joseph Weber, 4915 Lotus avenue, Sarah P. Brown, widow of the late Valle Brown, in the seventy-first year of her age. Funeral Thursday at Farmington, Mo.--Republic.

Miss Annie Faulkner, a young woman of Doe Run, committed suicide on the 1st inst., by shooting herself in the head. She left no note to indicate why she committed the rash act, but it is said she had been very despondent of late, and not long ago remarked to a friend that she believed she was going crazy.--Times.

Minnith News.

The six year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Thomure died of croup a few days ago.

Born, to the wife of Toby Galvin a fine boy on January 3rd.

Born, to the wife of Gus Beard a girl.

Herman Walders and Miss Sarah Holmes were united in the holy bonds of matrimony December 28th. Your correspondent wishes the young couple a long, happy and prosperous journey through life

Frank Harter and Miss Eila (Ella?) Obuchon were married recently. May their Union be blessed with peace and prosperity in the future.

Fair Play, January 23, 1897

Born, to the wife of Mr. Frank Pratte of St. Mary’s on Wednesday, January 20, 1897, a son.

A daughter was born to Mrs. Bernhardt Grieshaber of this city on Thursday, January 21st.

Born, on Wednesday, January 20, 1897, to the wife of Mr. Joseph Byington of this city, a son.

The wife of Capt. A. S. Lightner, the well known steamboat captain, died in St. Louis on Tuesday, January 19th.

Prosecuting Attorney Stanton made a trip to New Tennessee Wednesday to act as attorney in the case of Joseph Frank, colored, charged with common assault, Frank plead guilty and was fined $100 and costs. Hon. Jasper N. Burks of Farmington was the attorney for the defendant.

Died, at his home in this city on Tuesday, January 19, 1897, Mr. George Grass, aged seventy-six years and nine months. The remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery at Valle Spring on Thursday morning after a funeral high mass had been sung for the repose of the soul by Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout. The deceased was father-in-law of Collector Frank J. Huck.

Mrs. Michael Vieh died at her home in this city on Monday afternoon, January 18, 1897, at 1:25 o’clock at the age of sixty years and three months. Mrs. Vieh had been ill for a couple of weeks, but not dangerously so, and her death was a great shock to her many friends. The remains were taken to St. Louis Wednesday to be interred in the cemetery in that city.

The deceased was born at Wolwesheim, Rhenish Bavaria, and came to America with her parents in 1842, and was married to Mr. Michael Vieh in St. Louis on June 7, 1859. Eight children were born to them, three only of whom are living.

Mr. and Mrs. Vieh have been residents of our city for about twenty years, during which time they conducted a bakery and confectionery shop here. Mrs. Vieh’s mother died in St. Louis just one month ago. The bereaved husband and family have the sympathy of the community in their sad loss.  R. I. P.

Bloomsdale News.

News reached this place Tuesday morning, 12th inst, that the Pleasant Grove school house near Kinsey had been destroyed by fire the day before. The fire originated from the burning soot in the flue, and as there was no water at hand the teacher and pupils were unable to extinguish the flames. But we are glad to say they succeeded in saving all the furniture which enables them to continue their schools in a private house.

Mr. A. P. Mackley taught the Pleasant Grove school last year and by his gentle and assuming manners won the love and respect of all the patrons as well as the pupils in the district. So well pleased were they with the way he conducted the school that at the expiration of the term he was engaged to teach the same school again this year.

Emmet Sutton shot and killed Charles Wise at Cape Girardeau last Monday. The murderer escaped and is still at large.

Fair Play, January 30, 1897

Born, on Saturday, January 23, 1897, to the wife of Mr. Columbus Abernathy a daughter.

Born, on Friday, January 29, 1897, to the wife of Mr. Leon Herman of this city, a daughter.

Married, in this city, on Thursday, January 28, 1897, by Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout, Mr. Robert H. Abernathy and Miss Mamie Boyer, both of Ste. Genevieve.

Mr. Jules Rozier and wife and Pratte Rozier of St. Mary’s, and Paul Bond of Perryville attended the funeral of Mayor C. C. Rozier in our city Tuesday.

Mrs. Sophia Johnson (colored) had the misfortune to fall and break her leg last Tuesday. She is about seventy-five years of age.

Miss Lucie and Benjamin Rozier of St. Louis and Anthony C. Rozier of St. Paul attended the funeral of their father in our city.

Died, at Tallahassee, Fla., January 23, 1897, Aglae Chouteau Valle of St. Louis, wife of the late Nere Valle. Funeral from Rock Church at 10 o’clock Wednesday, January 27.--Globe Democrat.

Mr. Emile P. Vogt died at his residence in Ste. Genevieve, Thursday, January 28th, 1897, in the 55th year of his age, and will be buried at 9:30 o’clock this morning, Jan. 30. Obituary next week.

Died, on Thursday, January 28 1897, Agnes Hazel, the five days’ old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Columbus Abernathy. The remains were interred in the Valle Spring Catholic cemetery at 3:30 o’clock yesterday afternoon.

Died, on Monday, January 25, 1897, at 6:20 o’clock P M. Mr. John Beckermann, aged 85 years. The deceased was born at Badbergen, Hanover, Germany, on April 22, 1812, and came to America in 1858.  His wife died in St. Louis on August 18, 1859. Mr. Beckermann was the father of five children, two of whom are living, George of this city and Henry of St. Louis.  The remains were interred in the Lutheran cemetery by the members of the G. A. R. Post of this city on Wednesday. The services were read by comrades Leon Jokerst and Capt. Gustav. St. Gem.

Our friend, Barbeau A. Roy, editor of the Bonne Terre Democrat Register, was married on Wednesday, January 20th, 1897, to Miss Onna G. Thomure, a highly respected young lady of Bonne Terre. Rev. Father C. F. O’Leary performed the ceremony at the Catholic church. The bride is a niece of Mr. Sephis Thomure of this place. Barbeau and his young wife have our best wishes for a prosperous and happy wedded life.

Obituary.

Our well-known, popular and bosom friend, Charles C. Rozier, familiarly called Major Rozier by his numerous friends, has left us forever. His vigorous constitution, though a cripple at and since the age of eight years, became quite feeble and infirm some years ago, and finally succumbing to blood poisoning, he died, thus closing his earthly career at 6:30 A. M Sunday,the 24th inst., at his residence on Merchant Street.

His familiar form will no more be seen by his many staunch and beloved friends. His funeral took place at 2 P.M. the Tuesday following his death; his many friends, associates and acquaintances, though the day was bitter cold, attended. No large cortege of a similar character and under like conditions has ever been seen in our city.

His pall-bearers were Messrs. John L Bogy, Chas. W. Hamm, W. F. Cox, Val. Rottler, Jno. L. Boverie, Jules Boyer, Wm. H. Bantz Louis Maumann, Anton Samson and Chas. H. Biel.

Father Chas. van Tourenhout officiated at the obsequies in the church and at the grave in the Catholic cemetery near Valle Spring. A large number of carriages and other vehicles, men on horseback and on foot, followed the hearse, thus presenting a testimonial to his merits as well as their love and affection for him.

His beloved and devoted wife, together with such of their children as could be notified, attended the funeral as did his two brothers and two sisters, Messrs. Felix and Jules Rozier, Mrs. Mary Hertich and Mrs. Felicite Flamm. Unfortunately, General F. A. Rozier could not attend because of serious illness.

Major Rozier, the seventh son of Mr. and Mrs. Ferdinand Rozier, now dead, came to this world in the good old city of Ste. Genevieve, Sept. 1st, 1830. Entering St. Vincent’s Catholic College, Cape Girardeau, Mo., in 1843, and taking a regular course, he graduated in 1849. His graduation accomplished, he studied law with his brother, Gen’l F. A. Rozier.

In 1850 he abandoned the law and became editor of The Democrat, a Benton paper, in Ste. Genevieve, having purchased the press and office fixtures from Mr. P. G. Furguson, who a number of years later became a writer on the Globe-Democrat. Major Rozier called his paper The Creole, and, running it about one year, he removed to St. Louis and began publication of the Moniitor of the West, in both English and French. When his paper, however, proved unprofitable, he, in 1853, returned to Ste. Genevieve and started the publication of the Plaindealer, a Democratic paper.

He was elected Clerk of the Circuit and County Courts in 1853, for Ste. Genevieve County, and being re-elected in 1859 he held the two offices till the spring of 1865 when he resigned and again removed to St. Louis where he and his partner, Joseph J. Gross, failed in the Commission business. He then again returned to the good old city where he first saw the light, and in 1868 began the practice of his profession, confining his business almost entirely to Ste. Genevieve county. He was too much of a crippled to go to and from courts outside of this county; he succeeded, notwithstanding, until his condition becoming such, because of corpulency, he was compelled to almost entirely abandon his profession. However, he was elected Probate Judge in 1894, his daughter Marie afterward acting as his clerk. When elected he was public administrator.

In 1864 he took the agency for the Life Association of America for the whole of Southeast Missouri. It was lucrative, but because of his inability to travel and his growing professional duties he was compelled to abandon it. Major Rozier was Mayor of Ste. Genevieve in 1874, ‘75, ‘76 and again for eighteen years next preceeding his death.

He was a regent of the Southeast Missouri Normal School Board by appointment of Gov. Franels; this office he resigned because of his inability to travel. He was president of the Ste. Genevieve Agricultural and Mechanical Society; this he also resigned at the end of two years.

In 1864 and again in 1868, he was a candidate on the democratic ticket for State Auditor, and, the Republicans having control of the election machinery of the State, he was, because of that condition of affairs and the disfranchisement laws of the State, defeated on both occasions. He was a Catholic.

In 1859, he married Miss Emily LaGrave, daughter of the grand old gentleman, Mr. Anthony LaGrave, now deceased, then of, whose memory is not lost to the inhabitants of, the good old city of Ste. Genevieve.

He leaves eight children, four boys and four girls. (lengthy editorial on his character not transcribed).

A marriage license was issued this week to Nicholas Grither of New Offenburg and Miss Julia Flieg of Zell.

Bloomsdale News.

Born, to the wife of Mr. Xavier Govreau, on Wednesday, January 20, 1897, a son.

Died, at his home near this place Wednesday, January 20. 1897. Mr. Alex. Morice, aged 82 year. The remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery at this place on Friday morning, after a funeral high mass had been sung for the repose of the soul by Rev. Father Helmbacher. The funeral was followed by a large concourse of relatives and friends.

Mrs. Vital LaRose died at her home near this place on Saturday, January 23, 1897, at the age of 51 years. The remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery at this place on Monday morning, after a solemn Requiem had been sung for the repose of her soul by Rev. M. Helmbacher. Mrs. LaRose was taken ill with pneumonia nine days previous to her death. The deceased leaves nine children and many relatives and friends to mourn her loss. The community extends their heartfelt sympathy to the bereaved family.

Fair Play, February 6, 1897

Born, on Tuesday, February 2, 1897, to the wife of Joseph Oil, (colored) a daughter.

A son was born to the wife of Mr. Joseph Nager of St. Mary’s on January 15th.

A daughter was born to Mrs. Andrew Grass of Bloomsdale on January 16th.

Born, on January 19, 1897, to the wife of Mr. Charles Rehm of this city, a son.

Born, on Thursday, February 4, 1897, to the wife of Mr. William M. Ziegler of this city, a son.

Miss Carrie O’Hara of Ruma was married last Monday to Mr. Geo E. Bolhofner of Red Bud.

A daughter was born on Sunday, January 31, 1897, to the wife of Mr. Eloy Papin of this city.

Mr. Louis Obuchon, the Ulam postmaster, is in town this week on business before the county court.

Born, on Saturday, January 2, 1897, to the wife of Clarence Rudloff of River aux Vases, a daughter.

Marriage licenses were issued this week to William A. Vogt and Theresia Thomure of River aux Vases and Francis X. Beuchere of Kaskaskia and Annie Kern of Fulda, Indiana.

Died, at River aux Vases, on Tuesday, February 2, 1896 (apparent typo), of bronchitis, Raymond Aloysius, son of Mr. William Basler, aged ten months.

Born, on Monday, February 1st, 1897, to the wife of Judge Joseph G. Hoffman of this city, a daughter.

Mr. Bernard Morice died at his home near Bloomsdale of cancer of the throat on Saturday, January 30, 1897.

Mrs. Mary U. Huck, nee Fischer, died at the residence of her son-in-law, Mr. Joseph Weiler, in this city, on Sunday last, January 31, 1897, at 11:30 P. M. of pneumonia. She had been in failing health for some time, but only contracted pneumonia three days before her death. The funeral occurred Wednesday morning at ten o’clock from the Catholic Church and was one of the largest ever witnessed in Ste. Genevieve. A funeral High Mass for the repose of the soul was song by Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout.

Mrs. Huck, whose maiden name was Fischer, was born at Hafmeier, Germany, on January 15, 1822, and came to America with her parents in 1834. She was married to Mr. Florian Huck in 1844. Her husband died March 2, 1875. Eleven children were born to them, six of whom are living. She also leaves thirty-four grandchildren and eight great grand children.

Southeast Missouri.

Mrs. Mary Rollins, who is 105 years old was taken sick at New Madrid while on her way from Tennessee to Maiden. She had 13 children 19 grand-children and 3 great-grandchildren. all of whom are dead, so she is utterly alone in the world.

Samuel Byington purchased a farm in Ste. Genevieve county and has recently removed to it. Mr. Byington is a prosperous, good farmer, and will be greatly missed in our midst. Wm. Cruncleton, Sr., has also purchased a farm in Ste. Genevieve county, but will remain with us a while longer.--Farmington Times.

Fair Play, February 13, 1897

Born, on January 30, 1897, to the wife of Mr. Henry Arnold, a daughter.

Born, on Wednesday, February 10, 1897, to the wife of Edward Andre (colored) a son.

Died, at St. Joseph, Mo., February 7, 1897, Felix Grieshaber, aged 41 years. He leaves a wife and four children. Deceased was a brother of Mrs. Joseph Vaeth of this city.

Mr. David Vaeth of New Offenburg, mention of whose illness was made in our last issue, died on Saturday last, February 6, at 3:30 A. M. An obituary will appear next week.

Died, on Wednesday, February 10, 1897 at 9:30 o’clock A. M., Mrs. Emelie Shaw, nee Janis, aged 90 years, 5 months and 6 days. The funeral took place from the Catholic Church Friday morning after a Requiem High Mass for the repose of the soul had been sung by Rev. Father Weiss.

Died, of pneumonia, on Thursday, February 11, 1897, at nine o'clock A.M., at the  age of twenty eight years, Miss Marie LaGrave Rozier, beloved daughter of the late Charles C. Rozier and Emelie LaGrave Rozier.

Mr. John E. Ernst, son of Mr. Joseph A. Ernst of this city, was married to Miss Lizzie E Luers in St. Louis at the Sacred Heart Church by Rev. Father McCabe on Wednesday, February 10th, at 3:30 P.M.

General Firmin A. Rozier, one of Ste. Genevieve’s oldest and most respected citizens, departed this life on Thursday night, February 11th, at 9:25 o’clock, at the age of 76 years.

Mr. Auguste Barisien died of pneumonia in this city last Saturday morning, February 6, 1897, at the age of 72 years. Mr. Barisien (Baristen?) had been engaged as mail carrier between this place and Ste. Genevieve for several years and made the trip during the extreme cold weather, although advised by his friends not to do so. He contracted pneumonia on Thursday, January 28th, and lingered until the 6th inst. The funeral took place Sunday afternoon at four o’clock and was largely attended. Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout performed the last ceremonies.

Staabtown News.

Mr. Wm. Basler had the misfortune to lose her youngest child on the 2nd inst.

The latest arrival is at Wm. Heck’s and “Billy” is smiling happy.

Womack News.

The infant child of J. M. Hahn had its arm broken by a fall.

Emile P. Vogt.

None know life’s secrets but the happy dead

Emile P. Vogt was born December 1, 1842, at Ste. Genevieve, Mo, in the old Dufoure home which adjoins the pretty home where he breathed his last on the morning of January 28, 1897,of dilatation of the stomach and tuberculosis of the bowels. The deceased was of French and German blood. His father died on the same lot when Emile was fifteen years old. A lovely sister died also and lies buried in the old Catholic cemetery. His aged mother entered into rest from the same old home on August 10, 1895. One brother, Offo of Salem, Ill., and a dear sister, Mrs. Isaac Reynolds of Chicago, survive. The latter was unable to attend the funeral on account of illness in her family. At the death of his father, the young Emile went into the Clerk’s office at Ste. Genevieve, and worked and studied here until the breaking out of the Civil War. He then entered the Academy at Perryville, Mo. He subsequently went into business as a civil engineer at St. Louis. He had also been in business at other points in Missouri, but for many years had been Land Examiner and Real Estate Agent at Ste. Genevieve in his office are voluminous abstracts on which he has applied the work of a lifetime. For neatness, legibility, and correctness the work could rarely be equalled, and never surpassed. The volumes would be an invaluable acquisition to the county. On September 18, 1866, Mr. Vogt was married to Miss Mattie Ed Dudley, who is a descendant of the well known Dudleys of Kentucky. Nine children were born to them. Two little ones were early transmitted to the “Better Land.” Elvina, the wife of William M. Ziegler of Oak Hill Farm, Irene, Effie, Ada, Odile, Emile Dudley and Mattie are left with the stricken wife to mourn the loss of a loving, considerate husband and an idolized father. (lengthy editorial on his character not transcribed).

Mr. Vogt was born and reared in the Catholic faith, and received all the last Sacraments of the Church. The rich tones of his voice had been heard for twenty years or more in the choir of his beloved church. He had been President of the Catholic Knights Society for many years, and was re-elected to that office but a week previous to his death. His brothers of that Order, kept the last silent watches by his bier, and marched in a body to the Valle Spring Catholic cemetery, where the remains were interred. Father C. L. van Tourenhout celebrated a Requiem Mass at 9:30 A. M. on Saturday, the 30th, and performed the last sad rites.

Messrs, C. W. Hamm, A. H. Chadwell, J. Burch, H. Okenfuss, J. Simon, Richard Schultz, L. Maumann and A. Samson acted as pall bearers.

Island Items. Born, on Saturday, January 12, to the wife of Mr. McDowey, a daughter.

Fair Play, February 20, 1897

Born, on Monday, February 8, 1897, to the wife of Mr. Frank Sexauer of this city, a son.

A son was born to the wife of Mr. Benj. Wilson of this city on Sunday, February 14, 1897.

Arthur Duestrow, the wife and child murderer, was hanged at Union, Mo., on Tuesday, 16th.

Born, on Thursday, February 18m 1897, to the wife of Mr. E. A. Rozier of this city, a daughter.

Mr. Henry Hammer died at his home near Kinsey of typhoid pneumonia on Wednesday, 10th inst., at the age of 66 years.

Mr. David Vaeth, who died at the home of his son Henry at New Offenburg on Saturday, February 6, was born at Frendenburg, Baden on June 14; 1816. He came to America in 1840, and in May 1846, was married to Theresa Hogenmiller. Seven children were born to them, four of whom are living. On the 4th of last May Mr. and Mrs. Vaeth celebrated their golden wedding, an account of which appeared in this paper at the time. Mr. Vaeth was a blacksmith by trade and followed this business at his place on the Plank Road for many years.

Mr. Vaeth was a man highly regarded by all who knew him. Of a happy disposition, he had a kind word for all, and was well liked and respected in the community where he resided. The funeral took place from the Weingarten Catholic Church on Sunday morning at eleven o’clock and was largely attended. Rev. Father Muehlsiepen officiated.  R. I. P.

Mrs. Clarence LaRose died at her home in this city on Wednesday, February 17, 1897, at the age of seventy-four years. The funeral will occur from the Catholic Church this morning at nine o’clock.

Miss Marie. L.(middle initial is illegible) Rozier.

The family of the late Charles C. Rozier was again plunged into the deepest grief last Thursday, when inexorable death again entered and snatched away Miss Marie Rozier from a devoted circle of relatives and friends.

Shortly after the death of her father, Marie was taken ill by an attack of pneumonia, and although the best medical skill was employed and loving and devoted care was showered on her, she succumbed to the dread disease at last.

The bereaved family have the sympathy of the whole community; not only because death came so soon after the father of the family had been summoned; not only because Miss Marie was called when everything seemed to promise many years of usefulness, but especially because a most devoted daughter, a model of filial love and devotedness, who would have been a source of strength to her widowed mother, was so suddenly taken away. (lengthy editorial not transcribed.)

General Rozier. (communicated)

In the death of General Firmin A. Rozier, the town of Ste. Genevieve and its whole community have lost one of the noble descendants of its early settlers, and one of our best citizens. His whole character was that of a most public-spirited and affable gentleman. A born and educated Ste. Genevieve boy and Missourian, he dearly loved his native town and State, and always enlisted his energies in any enterprise promotive of the interests and welfare of his town, county and State. Twice a member of the House and once of the Senate of the Missouri Legislation, his record therein was distinguished for faithfulness of services, not only to his immediate constituents, but to the State at large: being, indeed, though a Democrat, the public servant of the people, not as a partisan.

The prosperity of Ste. Genevieve was ever dear to his heart; so when at different times several railroad projects were contemplated, we were sure to find General Rozier giving them his aid, ay, his material support, and if Ste. Genevieve is not a rail road town, it is certainly not his fault.

The friend and associate of the late Hon. Thomas H. Benton, Missouri’s greatest Senator and Statesman, during his whole life, General Rozier also was familiar with Henry Clay, John J. Crittenden and other great men, whose acquaintance he formed while attending Transylvania Law School at Lexington, Ky., where he graduated in law. It is yet fresh in the memory of every citizen of Ste. Genevieve, when he built, established and kept in a flourishing condition as Academy of learning for young men in this town, at quite to him a financial loss, and which only ceased to exist on account of the unavoidable operations of the late was of the rebellion.

It would take a much greater effort than this short communication can accomplish to enumerate all the merits and good qualities of our deceased old friend. General Rozier was truly, with all the force of expression, one of the best of men. Loved by every one who knew him (and his friends were numberless), he had a good word for every body, high and low, old and young, charity being his ruling trait of character, while generosity had no bounds. Hence, while he had passed by many years the alloted life of man, yet we cannot cease to lament his loss, as having come too soon, and for many years we will miss his amiable and familiar countenance, the like of which cannot be replaced.

Eloped with a Child.

John McDonnell, a married man of Doe Run, eloped last week with 13 year old Bertha Ray. The girl it seems, became infatuated with McDonnell, and was not discouraged by him, although her family tried to break the attachment. Wednesday last she departed quietly, and McDonnell was also missed. It was learned that they were together at Bonne Terre, the girl keeping out of sight most of the time. Saturday morning they were seen in Riversdale, a village near Bonne Terre. They left there on the Iron Mountain train for St. Louis. John Ray, a brother of the girl, secured enough evidence to swear out a warrant against McDonnell, charging him with enticing a child from home, and then went to St. Louis to find the pair. DeSoto Press.

Prisoners Escape.

On Wednesday night of this week four prisoners confined in the Hillsboro jail, broke out. They managed to cut a hole in the floor and then dug out under the wall and climbed the iron fence. It is not known  how long they have been cutting through the floor, not very long though. They were William Morgan and Frank Travis who were being held for the grand jury, charged with burglary of Slawsoo & Kingston’s store in this city. Charles Allen of near Crystal City, who is charged with rape, and Wesley Neal, a negro who was serving a jail sentence for burglary. Travis was recaptured in this city at the home of his parents on the east side about 2:30 on Thursday by the officers and taken back to Hillsboro.--DeSoto Press.

Fair Play, February 27, 1897

Mr. William Vogt and Miss Therese Thomure were united in the holy bonds of matrimony during High Mass at the Catholic Church at River aux Vases on Tuesday, February 23, Rev. Father A. H. Schaefer, officiating.  The bride was assisted by her sisters Misses Euphrasia and Bertha Thomure and the groomsmen were Messrs George and Theodore Vogt, brothers of the groom.

Mr. Valentine Schuh died at his home near River aux Vases of typhoid fever on Thursday, February 23, at the age of 39 years.

Mrs. Jacob Hurka died of consumption at her home at New Offenburg Saturday morning, February 20th.

Born, on Sunday, February 21, 1897, to the wife of Mr. Eli LaRose of Weingarten, a daughter.

Born, on Tuesday, February 23, 1897, to the wife of Mr. Louis Dorge of this city, a son.

Born, on Saturday, February 20, 1897, to the wife of Mr. Steve Aulsbury, a son.

Married, at the Catholic Church in this city on Wednesday, 24th inst., by Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout, Frank Bazile and Matilda Randalls, (colored)

Mr. Frank Burgert and Miss Lizzie Grieshaber were married at the Catholic Church in this city on Tuesday morning during mass, Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout officiating.

The four weeks’ old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Clemens Heiserer of New Bremen died on Friday 19th inst. The remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery at River aux Vases on Sunday.

Mrs. Annie Duboise, nee Schoof died at her home in St. Louis last Friday at the age of twenty-two years. The remains were brought to this place Saturday night and interred in the Catholic cemetery at River aux Vases on Sunday.

Staabtown News.

Typhoid fever is still raging. Mr. Alfred Lalumondiere has three stricken with the dreaded disease.

A double burial occurred here last Monday--Heiser and Schoff.

Mr. William Vogt was married to Miss Thresa Thomure on Tuesday the 23 inst., at River aux Vases. Rev. A. H. Schaefer officiating. The newly married couple were the recipients of many presents--presents more useful than ornamental. May their future life be a foundation of pleasure and success.

The trial for the possession of a colt between Joseph Vorst and Henry Eichenlaub took place before ‘Squire Cox at the Court House last Saturday afternoon and resulted in a verdict for Mr. Eichenlaub. Attorney E. A. Rozier represented Mr. Vorst and Mr. Eichenlaub’s interests were looked after by Prosecuting Attorney Stanton.

Fair Play, March 6, 1897

Died, on Friday, February 26, 1897, the three weeks’ old daughter of Joseph Oil and wife. The remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery Saturday.

Maximillion, the eight years old son of Mr. and Mrs. Lucien Lalumondiere, was badly scalded by boiling coffee Monday morning.

Born, on Thursday, March 4, 1897, to the wife of Mr. William Bracy of this city, a daughter.

From the St. Louis Republic of Thursday we learn that a marriage license has been issued to Miss Annie Herzog of this city and George Dettmann of St. Louis.

Mr. John M. Rutledge, father of Dr. G. M. Rutledge of this city, died at his home near Danby on Wednesday, February 25, 1897, of pneumonia, at the age of 62 years.

Died, at Weingarten on Wednesday, February 24th, of pneumonia, Herman, infant child of Joseph and Mary Brischle, aged 8 months. The remains were interred in the Weingarten Catholic cemetery Thursday, February 25, at 3 o’clock P. M., by Rev. Father Muehlsiepen.

(Communicated.)

Mr. Bob Horton of Jones is proud of having made even honors for McKinley as against the Bryan boy at Henry Vaeth’s. I am told the McKinley baby is not christen yet, and if I am not mistaken, a boy was born to Fair Play, March 6, 1897 of Union township since the last general election and they have called him Bryan. Hurrah for Bryan; he is ahead!

Ed. Allen of Mine La Motte, a brakeman on the local freight on the Iron Mountain, met with a painful accident at Glen Allen on last Tuesday while coupling cars. He got his right foot caught between one of the wheels and the rail in an angling position and had four toes and one side of his foot mashed so badly that amputation will be necessary. He was taken to St. Louis on the passenger on Tuesday afternoon to the Missouri Pacific hospital. His injuries while painful are not considered dangerous.--Fredericktown News.

Mr. Nicholas Wehner, one of Ste. Genevieve’s old and respected citizens, died at his residence on Main street last Saturday morning, February 27, 1897, at the age of seventy-one years and nine months. The funeral took place on Monday morning at ten o’clock after a funeral High Mass had been sung for the repose of the soul by Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout.  Mr. Wehner was a good christian and a charitable man and his funeral was attended by a large number of people. He was born bear Fulda in Hesse Cassel, Germany, May 3 1825, and came to America in 1847. The same year he was married to Clara Schneider, who still survives him. Six children were born to them, four of whom are living, viz: Mrs. Wm. Baumstark, Mrs. Fred. Bolle, George and Peter.  Mr. Wehner moved to Ste. Genevieve in 1860 and established a grocery store and later a lumber yard and was very successful in his business undertakings, and has a host of friends who will regret to learn of his death. R. I. P.

List of Wedding Presents

Given to Mr. William Vogt and Miss Therese Thomure, who were married at River aux Vases on February 23: (gifts/givers not transcribed).

Drowned in the “Cut Off”

On Wednesday of last week a mysterious and fatal accident occurred on the river near Kaskaskia, it is presumed in the “cut off,” which ended the lives of three well known citizens. Two of them, Donatus Beiter, and old time resident and druggist and John Kintz, Jr, a son of the village clerk of the historic town, the other a colored lad, Tom Little, son of Henry and Eliza Little, formerly of Chester, now of Sparta. The three, accompanied by Welda Menard, started off from Kaskaskia on a hunting expedition.

They secured a punt or flat bottomed boat and crossed the old channel back of the village to a sand bar where Menard left the boat. The arrangement was for him to cross the bar and meet his companions, who continued in the skiff, at the upper end. On reaching there they were not on that side by looking across he saw them near the shore close to the “cut off.” Two of them were in the boat, the other on shore had a rope and was towing or “cordeling” the craft up stream towards the “cut off.” They were also seen at this work by John Morris, a resident living near the mouth of the Okaw.

About that time, perhaps 2 o’clock in the afternoon, when last seen by Menard and Morris, the wind was blowing strongly and the river rough. The steamer Benton passed up and added to the swell about the time they were last observed. They were then working their way towards the “cut off” and since that time no human eye has seen them. It is supposed that when they reached the main channel they launched their frail craft, said to be old and rotten, and it either sank with them or capsized and they met their death in the waters of the Mississippi. Search has been made but nothing was discovered, nothing seen of men or boat, no clue of any kind, until Friday when William Danis found an oar which was identified as one belonging to the boat, two miles below Kaskaskia in the main channel of the river, and it is reported that the other oar and a box, known to have been used for a seat, were fished out of the river Tuesday.

There is but little doubt that the parties were drowned and that death came upon them suddenly. The sorrowful affair has cast a gloom over the community where the men were well known and highly respected.  Effort will be made to recover the bodies but it is hardly likely they will be found until they float to the surface.--Chester Clarion.

Fair Play, March 13, 1897

Louis Mack (colored) was tried and convicted Monday of carrying concealed weapons and sentenced to twenty days in the county jail.

Born, on Tuesday, March 9, 1897, to the wife of Mr. Gus. Winston, a son. The little one lived only a few hours after it was born.

Mr. Adolph Petrequin has made all necessary arrangements to start a steam laundry in our city. He purchased the machinery in St. Louis this week and intends to have the laundry in operation within a couple of weeks.

Fair Play, March 20, 1897

Born, on Wednesday, March 17, to the wife of Mr. Rudolph Doerge, a daughter.

Born, on Monday, March 15, 1897, to the wife of Mr. Henry Eichenlaub of this city, a daughter.

Fair Play, March 27, 1897

Born, on Monday, March 22, 1897, to the wife of Mr. Anton Kist of River aux Vases, a son.

Mr. Xavier Govro died at his home in this city at six o’clock Thursday evening, March 25, 1897.

Born, on March 11, 1897, to the wife of Mr. Valentine Rottler of River aux Vases, a daughter.

A son was born to the wife of Mr. Peter Naeger of Zell on Monday, March 15, 1897.

Fair Play, April 3, 1897

Born, on Saturday, March 27, 1897, to the wife of Mr. Edward Chardin of this city, a son.

Mrs. Emma Fulton and Mr. Gaston Crane arrived here Tuesday to visit their mother, Mrs. Martha Crane, who is ill with typhoid fever.

Mrs. Joseph Fallert of Zell died of pneumonia on Wednesday, March 31, 1897, at the age of 69 years. The remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery at Zell on Friday morning.

Fair Play, April 10, 1897

Mr. Wm. Roth and Miss Jessie McKee were married by Probate Judge Bogy last Tuesday, April 6th.

A marriage license was issued this week to Lawrence Gremminger and Annie Drury, both of Bloomsdale.

News was received here this week announcing the death at St. Joseph of Mr. Anthony Vaeth, uncle of Mr. Joseph Vaeth of this city. Mr. Vaeth was 75 years of age.

Mrs. _____Pfeifer, wife of the well known blacksmith who resides on the Saline near Minnith, departed this life on Monday, April 5, 1897, of consumption. She leaves five grown children and a husband to mourn her loss.

The barn of Max Freeman, who lives in Union township, was struck by lightning last Saturday and entirely destroyed by fire. Horses belonging to Joseph Thurman, William Claywell and James F. Pinkston were in the barn at the time and were killed by the stroke.

Fair Play, April 17, 1897

Jean Baptiste Janis.

Geographical sketch by Gustavus St. Gem.

Jean Baptiste Janis was born in the town of Kaskaskia, Illinois, September 18, 1859. His father, Nicholas Janis, emigrated from France to the French colony “des Illinois” when a young man and married at Kaskaskia April 27, 1751, Marie Louise, daughter of Jean Baptiste Taumure Lasourse. When General George Rogers Clark captured that place and took possession of the country July 4, 1778, he organized over it what may be termed a provisional Government. It appears he appointed John Todd Governor and Chief Magistrate, and five of the prominent citizens Justices of the Peace who constituted a District Court. They were Gabriel Cerre’ (leading merchant of town), Nicholas Janis, Jacque Lasourse, Duplasi and Lachance Carbonneau was the clerk of the court.

It further appears that General Clark organized a militia force to strengthen his small command. Jean Baptist Janis received a commission as “Ensign in the militia of the District of Kaskaskia, county of Illinois” (State of Virginia), issued July 14, 1779, by John Todd, who styes himself Lieutenant of the county of Illinois; but later, July 30, 1779, another commission was given Janis signed by General George Rogers Clark himself, constituting said Janis “Lieutenant and Ensign of Militia in Illinois,” the rank which he held in the volunteer company, commanded by Captain Francois Charleville, which marched from Kaskaskia with General Clark, and assisted in the capture of Post Vincennes.

Janis was nearly 20 years old when he entered the service under General Clark; he was a young man of medium size, about 5 feet 7 inches high, rather slender of figure, but vigorous, active and energetic, fond of adventure, with a limited education, such as the French schools of the country afforded at the time. After his return from the Vincennes expedition, he married a Prairie du Rocher, Illinois, in the year 1781, Miss Rene Julie Barbeau, and a short time after his marriage he crossed the river and settled in Ste. Genevieve in the territory then held under Spanish rule as upper Louisiana, where he lived until his death which occurred October 2, 1836, in the 78th year of his age, leaving a large progeny of whom only numerous grand and great-grand children are now living.

The commission received from General Clark could not be found among his old papers, but a receipt dated August 9, 1827, from E K Kane, attorney, shows that said commission, no w lost, was intrusted to said Kane who was to submit the claim of Janis for services as a Revolutionary Soldier, to the Government. This is the same Kane who became later one of the prominent men at Illinois, and was a U. S. Senator from 1826 to 1832.

The three grand children of Jean Baptiste Janis living in Ste. Genevieve, who still possess old family papers, kindly furnished the writer for reference, related a traditional incident in the life of their grandfather, connected with his services under General Clark as follows:  “When the attack was made on Post Vincennes (or rather Fort Sackville) and during the heat of action, the Ensign was wounded and dropped the colors; but young Janis, regardless of danger, immediately sprang forward and recovered the flag which he bore in triumph to the end of the contest, when victory was achieved in the capture of the place and surrender of the British forces.” I may have been in recognition of this act of bravery that General Clark commissioned Janis Ensign and Lieutenant; and if so this must have occurred after the return of his command to Kaskaskia, if history is correct in placing the date of the movement on Vincennes in February, as the Commission was dated July 30, 1779.

Born, on Tuesday, April 13, 1897, to the wife of Mr. Dionys Melchier of this city, a son.

Died, in St. Louis, on Tuesday April 13, 1897, at 5 P. M., after a lingering illness, Mrs. Minnie Piltz Zeisler, in her twenty-ninth year, beloved daughter of Mrs. Charles Rose.

Died-On Tuesday, April 6, 1897, Florentine Schirman after an illness of several months. Mr. Schirman was an elderly and well known citizen of Bonne Terre, and had been a respected citizen of this county for years. The funeral services were held at the Catholic Church on Thursday.--B. T. Democrat.

Obituary.

John Boyd was born in Bath county, Ky., April 1, 1814, and came with his parents to Missouri in his youth. He was married to Miss Martha Counts, January 2, 1840. To this union was born twelve children, six boys and six girls, two of them, one boy and one girl, preceded him to the glory world. He professed religion and joined the Baptist Church in 1868. Brother Boyd lived in Ste. Genevieve county on the farm on which he first settled his long, useful life.  He was a good citizen and kind neighbor, loved by all who knew him. His greatest love was for his church and family. He was faithful to attend to his church meetings and give to its needs. He was a kind and loving husband, a kind, patient and indulgent father. For the salvation of his soul and final triumph over death he depended upon the sufferings, death, resurrection and intercession of his blessed Savior. He had been in feeble health for several years. The first of the winter he became more feeble and continued to grow worse until, March 19, 1897, he fell asleep in Jesus, being 82 years, 11 months and 19 days old. He leaves a dear wife, ten children, fifty-seven grand-children and twenty-seven great grandchildren and many other relatives and friends to mourn their loss.

The family sent for the writer to attend the funeral, which we did on March 20th, and met a large congregation at the cemetery near New Tennessee Church, and after singing by the brethren and prayer by Brother Coffer, we read a part  of the 14th chapter of St. John and tried to speak words of comfort to the mourning wife and children and many friends of the departed one: then we laid his remains in the grave to rest till the great resurrection morn, when all the sleeping dead shall rise.  The sorrowing ones have our  heartfelt sympathy.-FarmingtonTimes.

Fair Play, April 24, 1897

A marriage license was issued in St. Louis Tuesday to Charles Blaine of that city and Miss Clara Wehner of Ste. Genevieve.

Born, in this city on Wednesday, April 21 1897, to the wife of Mr. Anthony C. Baum of St. Louis, a son.

Born, on Tuesday, April 6, 1897, to the wife of Mr. William Baumrn, Jr., of Ste. Genevieve, a son.

A daughter was born to the wife of Mr. Charles Kohm of this city on Tuesday, April 20, 1897.

Died, at St. Mary’s, on Monday, April 19, of pneumonia, little Daisy Mary, daughter of Martin and Mary Rond, aged five years and eleven months. The funeral took place Thursday afternoon at two o’clock.

Three of the four prisoners confined in our jail took French bail last Friday night and left for parts unknown. The lock on the cell was pried open and after entering the jail corridor the prisoners had easy work in escaping by knocking out a few bricks on the west wall of the jail. Four prisoners were in the cell at the time--all charged with peddling without a license--but one remained, claiming he was too sick to leave. On the day previous an Iron Mountain Railroad detective arrived here with the necessary papers to convey the prisoners to Hillsboro for it is claimed they had robbed an Iron Mountain train in Jefferson county.  He departed Saturday with the remaining prisoner. Sheriff Straughan, accompanied by Mr. Charles Meyers left early Saturday morning to search for the prisoners, but returned Sunday without their game. Notices have been printed and sent to the surrounding counties giving a description of the jail breakers.  They are as described as follows:  Tom Tracy, aged about 27 years, weight 159 lbs., height 5 feet, 8 or 9 inches.

James Wills, aged 18 years, height 5 feet 7 or 8 inches, weight about 140 lbs.

Will Austin, aged about 24 years, height 5 feet 10 inches, weight 150 lbs., has weak eyes.

The above described men are rather dark complected and had about two weeks’ growth of beard. Tracy and Austin talked with Irish brogue; had on fine shoes, badly worn. One had box-toed boots split in front.

Married.

Mr. Charles D. Blaine of St. Louis, and Miss Clara Wehner of this city were married Tuesday, April 20, 1897, at 7 o’clock in the evening by Rev. E. J. Shea of St. Kevin’s Church on Park and Compton avenues, St. Louis, Mo. Miss Annie Wehner was bridesmaid and Mr. Herman Schaeffer acted as groomsman. After the ceremony the bridal party repaired to the home of the bride’s sister, Miss Annie Wehner, 2326 Lafayette avenue, where they partook of a fine supper, after which they left for their present home 5321 Patton avenue. The Fair Play offers congratulations.

Born, on Monday, April 9, 1897, to the wife of Mr. John G. Steiger of Ste. Genevieve, a daughter.

Fair Play, May 1, 1897

A son was born to Mrs. Annie Abernathy Walton of St. Louis recently.

Mr. Charles Rottler received a letter this week announcing the death of his father, who died at his home in Germany on March 21st.

Died, on Moreau’s Island on April 16, Irene, beloved daughter of Mr. Clayburn Nelson, aged 17 months.

Marriage licenses were issued this week to Leo Kreitler of Weingarten and Emily Langelier of River aux Vases, and to Geo. Meyers of Bollinger, Mo., and Mary Ann Cambron of St. Mary’s.

Evan Johnson, the eighteen years old daughter of Charles Johnson (colored,) of St. Louis died in that city on Thursday, 28th, ist. The remains were brought here for burial Thursday.

Died, at her home near Bloomsdale, on March 17, 1897, of pneumonia, at the age of 38 years, Mrs. Agnes Poston, wife of John A. Poston. The deceased leaves a husband and seven children to mourn her loss.

Died, at her home near Lithium, on April 17, 1897, at 8:30 o’clock P. M., after a lingering illness of three months, Mrs. Harry E. McBride, nee Tallevast, aged 19 years, 3 months and 11 days, of anaemia chlorosis. She was a bride of only six months. She was attended by two eminent physicians, Dr. Shurley of Brewer, Mo., and Dr. McKinsey of Chester, Ill. She had all the care of a loving husband, mother and sisters. To mourn her loss she leaves a husband, parents, two sisters and one brother and a host of friends. The funeral took place at the St. Mary’s Seminary cemetery, of Perryville. May her soul rest in peace.

Fair Play, May 8, 1897

Miss Catherine Henderson of Coffman, this county, was married at Bonne Terre on April 28th to Mr. Frank Steinmetz of that place, Rev. C. R. O’Leary officiating.

A terrible accident occured near Jackson last Sunday, by which four persons lost their lives. Joe Johnson was driving a covered wagon in which were seated Mrs. Bugg, her two children, a son aged five years and a baby aged three, and Miss Minnie Frazier, all from Cousinville. As they entered the creek crossing the road at Jackson, the water, which was running very high and strong, overturned the wagon, which was swept away with its four helpless occupants, who were all drowned. Johnson drove the horses ashore and was saved. The wagon and the bodies of the victims were recovered a short distance down the stream.--Southeast Gazette.

A FOUL MURDER.

On Wednesday about midnight Miss Harriet Boillot was foully murdered with her own revolver by some unknown person in her house on Jefferson street, and up to the present time there is no clue to the murderer. The young lady was shot immediately above the heart with a 32 caliber revolver death was instantaneous.  The coroner’s jury is holding an inquest today (Friday) From all appearances Miss Boillot was killed by a burglar after she fired a shot a him. She occupied a room upstairs and it seems must have heard the burglar, who was on the lower floor ransacking the bureau drawers, and taking her pistol descended the stairs and fired, missing the mark as the ball passed through the partition and was afterwards found imbedded in the banisters on the back porch. The man must have ran and seized the young lady and a scuffle ensued in the hall where the fatal shot was fired for the body was found in the hall and the pistol lying close to her feet. Miss Constance Mangin, an aunt of the murdered girl, was sleeping in the room adjoining the hall and was awakened by the pistol shots. She gave the alarm and the neighbors soon gathered at the house. The sheriff and marshal were sent for and an examination of the premises showed that the burglar had effected an entrance to the house by breaking the lock on the back door.

Her gown was torn near the shoulder and finger marks were plainly visible on her wrist, proving that a scuffle must have occurred before the shot was fired.

A couple of weeks ago an attempt was made to enter the house and it was then that Miss Boillot purchased the revolver with which she was shot. All possible efforts are being made to apprehend the murderer and telegrams were sent to St. Louis, Chester and Farmington for blood hounds but none could be secured. We understand a detective will be sent to work on  the case. The murdered girl was only twenty-six years of age and her sad ending is deeply regretted by our citizens. The remains were laid to rest yesterday afternoon at four o’clock.

Fair Play, May 15, 1897

Burglar Kills a Brave Woman.

Mrs. Harriet Boillet was murdered at her home in Ste. Genevieve the other night at 12 o’clock.

She and her aunt, Miss Constance Mangin, occupied the house alone her bedroom being on the second  floor, and that of her aunt on the first. The murderer effected an entrance through the dining-room door passed through the room of the aunt without disturbing her, and was in the sitting-room ransacking things, when he was heard by Miss Boillett. She arose, took her revolver, and went down the stairs, and it is supposed, fired one shot at the murderer, who rushed upon her and in the struggle succeeded in taking the revolver from her and firing, the ball entering just above the heart, killing her instantly. The body was found in the hall a few minutes later by her aunt. There is nothing to work upon as a clew to the murderer.

A son was born one day this week to Mrs. Charles Schuler of Weingarten.

Mr. Fred Long died at his home near French Village last Saturday, May 8th.

Born, on Saturday, May 8, 1897, to the wife of Mr. Felix Karl of Weingarten, a son.

A blind horse, the property of Charles Schilly, fell into the river from the Island one day this week and was drowned.

Miss Rosa Annie, the fourteen years old daughter of Mr. Henry Bauer of River aux Vases, died on Thursday, May 6th, of consumption. The remains were interred on Saturday, 8th inst.

The two years old boy of Joseph Fallert fell on the porch last Sunday and broke his leg just above the knee.

On Thursday in the Probate Court Miss Constance Mangin was declared to be of unsound mind and Amiee Boillet was appointed guardian of her person and estate.

The county court has offered a reward of $500 for the arrest and conviction of the murderer of Miss Hattie Boillot. The family have also offered a reward of $250.  As yet there is no clue to the murderer.

Mr. Charles Petrequin and Miss Theresa Rottler were married on Wednesday, May 12, 1897, at 4 o’clock P. M. by Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout. Miss Mamie Baumstark of Valley Forge was bridesmaid and Master Fred Jokerst acted as groomsman. A fine wedding supper was served at the residence of the bride’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Valentine Rottler and in the evening the newly wedded pair took passage on the steamer Belle Memphis and will make the round trip to Memphis and return. The Fair Play extends best wishes.

The Boillot Inquest.

The inquest on the body of Miss Harriet Boillot, who was murdered in this city on the night of the 5th inst. closed last Saturday. The evidence disclosed that she was the recipient of anonymous letters at intervals for the last two years. It also developed that some of these letters, which Miss Boillot had expressed her determination to keep with the hope of finding the writer and prosecuting him, are missing, with a number of other papers. The crime has not yet been fastened upon any one. It is alleged the identity of the anonymous letter-writer is suspected. The family of the young woman has offered a reward of $250, and the County Court offers an additional reward of $500 for the arrest and conviction of the murderer.

DE CHARLEVILLE.

Biographical and Historical sketch by Gustavus St. Gem.

Francois Chauvin de Charleville, born at the post of Kaskaskia, “des Illinois” (the date of his birth is not ascertained, as the old baptismal church records anterior to the  year 1759 are either lost or destroyed, but it is presumed to be in 1754) was the fourth son of Joseph Chauvin, Marquis de Charleville, and Genevieve Rivard. The Marquis, who died in February, 1778, was one of the many French gentlemen of culture who sought their fortunes in the colonies of “La Belle France,” in the New World. His sons, scions of a noble family, were consequently well bred and given all the benefits of what education the new country could afford. Kaskaskia had, at the time his children grew up, become an important and populous town of about five thousand inhabitants, including negro slaves and Indians; it was, indeed, the metropolis of the Great West, with a large trade, and had quite a refined society, to which was added that of the English officers of the garrison at Fort Gage, built and occupied by the English in 1772, on the site of the old French fort originally erected in 1736. The writer finds that in 1772 Hugh Lord, captain 18th Regiment Royal Irish, was the Military  British Commandant of the Illinois country, and exercised such authority until 1776, when he was removed with his command to Canada, thus leaving no British forces in garrison when General Clarke captured the place. Philippe Francois de Rastel, Chevallier de Rocheblave was the Governor; and Pierre Gibault was the Roman Catholic parish priest and vicar general of the Bishop of the Diocese of Quebec, Canada, while the Jesuit Missonaires ahd also a school and establishment in or near the town. The white population of the place, was, with little exception, totally French in numbers as well as in feeling, manners and sentiment.

The Marquis de Charleville with his sons, as well as most of the proud French citizens of Kaskaskia, including the Reverend Father Gibault, submitted with ill grace to be ruled by Great Britain, the ancient enemy of France; and hence it was quite natural for such people, not only to make no resistance to the capture of the place by the American Virginians under General George Rogers Clarke July 4th, 1778, but, on being informed of the situation and object of this invasion, to have hailed the invaders as deliverers, as shown by the alacrity with which they responded to the General’s call for volunteers to assist him in his expedition for the capture of Post Vincennes, and thereby to wrest from British power the whole Northwest territory known then  as “le pays des Illinois.”  As further evidence of the French feeling existing, when General Clarke appeared before Kaskaskia, Father Gibault immediately communicated with him (it is said secretly,) and offered him the benefit of his influence, and accordingly greatly facilitated.  The surprise of de Rocheblave, the English governor, and capture of the town; and it is moreover related that the good priest gave information and a ssistance which largely contributed to the success of the Vincennes expedition.

Francois Chauvin de Charleville, from what could be ascertained, grew up into manhood a well developed young man, slightly under six feet in height derived from his father, robust, active, full of ambition and adventure, demonstrating that vivacity and gallantry peculiar to the French character. He was naturally popular with his countrymen and more than likely exercised much influence in organizing, at the call of General Clarke, the company of Kaskaskia volunteer Militia of which he was chosen and commissioned Captain, a trust which he discharged with honor, bravery, ability and faithfulness, in participating with that intrepid commander, in the dangers, exposure and suffering incident to the march, attack and capture of Vincennes. And it must be mentioned that Captain de Charleville left his young wife and family at home to heroically peril his life in this enterprise, as the records show that he married Marie Louise Lonval, June 11, 1776, less than three years before the Post Vincennes expedition. He returned from this expedition, so noted in American history, to enjoy a domestic quiet home in Kaskaskia, where he died; but the date of his demise is not here given, for the reason that the old mortuary records of the place belonging to the Catholic Church could not be examined by the writer, as they were taken to Alton, Illinois, by order of the Catholic Bishop Baltes, of whom doubtless on application information in this respect could be obtained; and in the cemetary, where his remains were consigned, there is no gravestone to mark the last resting place of one so deserving a worthy memorial.

Captain de Charleville had three sons: Andre, the eldest, who died in Kaskaskia, and Jean Baptiste and Charles, twins, who removed to near Bloomsdale, Ste. Genevieve county, Missouri, where they lived and died at a ripe old age. All three of his sons were soldiers of the war of 1812, serving in the U. S. Army under General Henry Dodge; they all were married and left numerous descendants.

Weingarten Items.

At the Catholic Church Tuesday, May 11, 1897, Miss Elizabeth Schwent of this place was married to Mr. Joseph Miller of Farmington. Rev. Father Muehlsipen performed the  ceremony.

Fair Play, May 22, 1897

Born, on Thursday, May 13, 1897, to the wife of Mr. Joseph Hauck of this city, a son.

Mrs. Ann Pratte, a very old lady of our city, met with an accident Monday evening by falling and breaking her hip, and is in quite a serious condition.--St. Mary’s correspondence of Perryville, Republican.

Governor Stephens has offered a reward of $200 for the arrest and conviction of the murderer of Miss Harriet Boillot. There is now a standing reward of $950 for the murderer.

Thieves stole a skiff Tuesday night belonging to Charles Meyers and William Baumstark. Mr. Meyers went to Chester Wednesday in search of the thieves but returned home the same day empty handed.

Mr. George Young, brother-in-law of Mr. G. Rehm of our city, died at his home in St. Louis last Sunday of typhoid pneumonia after an illness of four days. Mrs. G. Rehm and son, Henry, went to St. Louis Monday to attend the funeral.

From the Chester papers we learn that a marriage license was issued last week to Mr. Joseph Sucher and Mrs. Mary Ryan of Red Bud. The couple were married at Red Bud on the 16th and departed for St. Louis the same day on a bridal tour.

Minnith News.

Married, several days ago, Mr. Leo Pfeifer to Miss Nora Thomure. Rev. Carver performed the ceremony.

Our neighbor, Henry Thomure, departed from this place a few days ago. His intentions to go to Oklahoma to live.

Died, of cancer, on Monday, May 17, 1897, at 4:30 o’clock P.M., George Kiefer, aged 47 year. The deceased had several operations performed for cancer at the Marion-Sims College, St. Louis, but without lasting benefit. He leaves a wife and ten children to mourn his loss. The remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery at Valle Spring on Wednesday morning after a Requiem High Mass had been sung for the repose of the soul by Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout.

Weingarten News.

Joseph Baumann and Miss Sophia Muessig were married at the Catholic Church on Tuesday.

Fair Play, May 29, 1897

Born, on Sunday, May 16, 1897, to the wife of Mr. Xaxier Hoog of Ste. Genevieve, a son.

Vincent Schwent had the misfortune to break his leg while jumping out of a buggy on the Plank Road Tuesday evening.

Sister Sylvania, who taught the boys’ school several years ago, died in Kansas City on Thursday, June 20th.

From Wednesday’s St. Louis papers we learn that a marriage license has been issued to Madison Jennings of Ste. Genevieve county and Missouri E. Reeder of St. Louis.

Miss Lizzie Fazer and Mr. Charles Doll of St. Mary’s were married at the Catholic Church in that town by Rev. Father Wagner at five o’clock on Tuesday afternoon, May 25, 1897. A large crowd from this place attended the wedding ball held that evening. The Ste. Genevieve string band furnished the music for the dance.

Died.

Buckner--In this city, Tuesday evening, May 18, 1897, Marie Buckner, aged 17 years, 11 months and 2 days.

(editorial not transcribed)...Marie Buckner was born in Madison county and was the daughter of H. C. and Mary Buckner and was the last member of that family. The funeral was held from St. Michael’s church at 3 P. M., Thursday and interment in the Catholic cemetery. Fredericktown News.

Fair Play, June 5, 1897

Born, on Saturday, May 29, 1897, to the wife of Mr. Ed. Grobe of this city, a son.

The lumber mill of Mr. Joseph Leavenworth of Greenville, Miss., together with 5,000 feet of lumber, was destroyed by fire on Tuesday, May 25th. Loss, $5,000; no insurance.

Mr. Joseph Staeckle, who lives near Bloomsdale, was robbed of $85 last Saturday night. Mr. Staeckle arrived from St. Louis on that night, placed the money in the wardrobe and the next morning the package of money was missing. It is supposed the thief effected an entrance by breaking open one of the doors as the lock was found to be broken next morning.

While out frog hunting in company with William Bell on Tuesday of this week, Henry Siebert was accidentally shot through the leg, above the knee, with a twenty-two caliber ball. The shot passed entirely through the leg, but did not touch the bone, and the wound is not considered a dangerous one.

Weingarten Items.

On Friday June 1st Frank Schuler was married to Miss Josephine Hogenmiller. The ceremony was performed at the Catholic Church by Rev. Father Muehlsiepen.  The bride is one of the Weingarten church’s most prominent singers. Best wishes to the young couple.

Fair Play, June 12, 1897

Married, at Zell, by Rev. Father Pigge on Tuesday, June 1st, Mr. Anton Miller, Jr., and Miss Lena Fallert.

A marriage license was issued in St. Louis Wednesday to John M. Heck of Louisville, Ky., and Louise Schuler of Ste. Genevieve, Mo.

Frank Carpenter’s house at Bloomsdale was destroyed by fire Tuesday. The fire originated in the roof of the building.

Thomas Giles, one of the oldest, if not the oldest man in St. Francois county, died in Bismarck, May 24, 1897. Mr. Giles was born in Blount county, Tennessee, on the 25th day of March, 1798, and was 99 years, one month and 29 days old.

Mr. George Kenner of Murphysboro, formerly of St. Mary’s, and well known to many of our readers, met with quite a severe accident a couple of weeks ago. From what we can learn, he was in his hardware store, and got on the top of a stove to reach for some article, and attempted to step upon another stove but missed his footing and fell striking one of the stoves and breaking three ribs. His many friends in this section hope he may soon recover from his injuries.--Perryville Sun.

Henry Laporte was arrested by Marshal Berry Thursday and placed in jail charged with disturbing the peace.

Mr. Felix Petrequin and Miss Lizzie Schneider were united in the holy bonds of matrimony on Monday, June 7, 1897, at five o’clock P.M. by Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout. Attorney P. H. Huck was groomsman and Miss Genevieve Baum acted as bridesmaid. The marriage was a quiet affair, only the immediate members of the family being present. After the ceremony a fine supper was served at the residence of Mr. George Steigle, whose wife is a sister of the bride, and the happy young couple took passage on the Ferd Herold for St. Louis where they will spend their honeymoon. On their return they will make their home on Jefferson street, the property recently purchased by Mr. Petrequin. They have our best wishes for a long and happy life.

Fair Play, June 19, 1897

A daughter was born to Mrs. Martin Beckle of this city on Tuesday June 18, 1897.

Born, on Saturday, June 12, 1897, to the wife of Mr. Jules Petrequin of this city, twins--both boys.

Mrs. Ann Pratte died at her home at St. Mary’s last Sunday, 13th inst., at the age of seventy-eight years. The remains were interred in the St. Mary’s Catholic cemetery on Monday afternoon at three o’clock.

Married, during mass at the Catholic Church in this city on Wednesday morning at nine o’clock, by Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout, Mr. Camille J. Stanton and Miss Annie R. Rehm, both of this city. Mr. William C. Boverie and Miss Dora  Rehm were the groomsman and bridesmaid. A fine dinner was served at the residence of the bride’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. G. Rehm, and a reception was held in the afternoon. The young couple left for St. Louis Wednesday night where they will spend a few days and will also visit Jefferson City before their return. May their life be one of happiness is our wish.

Fair Play, June 26, 1897

Born, on Thursday, June 10, 1897, to the wife of Mr. Henry Eckert of Zell, a son.

Born, on Saturday, June 19, 1897, to the wife of Mr. Henry X. Klein of Ste. Genevieve, a daughter.

The nine months’ old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Felix Lalumondiere of this city died on Wednesday afternoon, June 23, 1897. The remains were interred in the Valle Spring Catholic cemetery Thursday afternoon.

While attempting to cross the slough in a wagon Wednesday morning a son of Mr. Charles Schilly narrowly escaped being drowned. The horses got in water beyond their depth and the wagon box floated away with the boy. Albert Feaman, who was standing on the bank saw the danger the boy was in and rescued him with a skiff. The horses swam over to the opposite shore and were saved.

Fair Play, July 3, 1897

The five-year-old son of Mr. Columbus Abernathy fell off of the porch last Sunday evening and broke his arm near the elbow.

Miss Lillian Blais of Red Bud, Ill., was shot and seriously injured by a burglar who had entered her father’s house last Monday night. Two tough looking negroes who were seen in the town the day before are suspected.

Died, at St. Mary’s on Wednesday, June 30, 1897, Mrs. John Jordan, aged 69 years and 6 months. The remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery on Thursday.

Miss Clara E. Lawbaugh, daughter of Postmaster Lawbaugh of St. Mary’s, died on Monday, June 28, 1897, at the age of 14 years, 6 months and 22 days. The funeral occurred on Tuesday morning.

Married, at the Catholic Church in this city on Wednesday, June 30, 1897, at five o’clock P. M., Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout officiating, Miss Lena Doerge of this city and Mr. Charles Dempsey of St. Louis. Miss Martha Meyer and Mr. Will Sexauer were bridesmaid and groomsman. A fine wedding supper was served at the residence of the bride’s mother after the marriage ceremony. The Fair Play extends best wishes.

Fair Play, July 10, 1897

Henry Eichenlaub had his foot badly mashed by a barrel of beer falling on it while at work at the brewery Monday.

Married, at St. Louis on Wednesday, July 7, 1897, Mr. Louis Schultz and Miss Amanda Taylor. Mr. Schultz is a son of Engineer Schultz of this city.

The roof of Gottlieb Rehm’s house caught fire last Monday at noon, it is presumed from a firecracker. The fire engine was called out but with a few buckets of water the fire was extinguished before the engine arrived.

A warrant was applied for this week for parties accused of the murder of Miss Hattie Boillot in May, but as the only evidence submitted was that of Miss Constance Mangin, who was recently declared to be on unsound mind by a jury in the Probate Court, ‘Squire Cox and Prosecuting Attorney Stanton refused to issue the warrant.

Born, on Monday, June 28, 1897, to the wife of Mr. Reinhardt Stuppy of Zell, a son.

On Tuesday, June 29, to the wife of Mr. John Naeger of Zell, a son.

On Wednesday, June 30, to the wife of Mr. Joseph Fallert, Jr., of Ste. Genevieve, a son.

On Wednesday, June 30, to the wife of Mr. Emile Geiler of Ste. Genevieve, a daughter.

On Saturday, July 3, to the wife of Mr. Irving Byington of Ste. Genevieve, a daughter.

On Sunday, July 4, to the wife of Mr. Sylvester Rozier of St. Mary’s, a son.

Died, on Thursday, July 1, 1897, the eleven month’s old child of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Myers.

On Saturday, July 3, the fifteen month’s old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Singley.

On Tuesday, July 6, the six month’s old baby of Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Grobe.

On Wednesday, July 7, the infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Henry E. Courtoise.

(Communicated)

Mr. Benjamin P. Boyer departed for Los Angleo, Texas, last Monday to make that place his home. It was a sad parting of relatives and friends when he bid farewell to all. Benj is a talented young man and as a musician his equal is hard to find.  When we loose him we loose one of our best musicians. We wish him all luck in the world and hope the sweet tone of his music will return some day to the old home sweeter than ever.

Sister Mary Evarista died on Wednesday, July 7, 1897, at Mount Carmel, the mother house of the Sisters of Charity in Dubuque, Iowa. She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Gregoire of that city, and was 41 years old. She entered the order twenty-four years ago, and was the superioress at Rock Island, Ill, until a year ago, when her failing health compelled her to come home, and she entered the infirmary. The funeral will be held Friday and the burial will be at Mount Carmel.--Globe-Democrat.

Weingarten Items.

Miss Annie Hogenmiller of this place met with a fearful accident on Monday of last week. She was at work in the wheat field accompanied by a number of others and her father’s dog, when she heard the dog bark in the woods. Going there to see what the dog was after, when she came to the place the dog had a little pig and was about to kill it. The young lady rushed up to it trying to rescue the pig when the dog turned around, biting her in the arm and the palm of the hand inflicting two ugly wounds.

Died, The infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Felix Karl died on Sunday July 4th. The remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery at Weingarten on Monday July 5th, 1897.

Fair Play, July 17, 1897

Born, to the wife of Mr. William Oberle on Saturday, July 10, 1897, a son.

Died, on Wednesday, July 14, 1897, Andrew, the seventeen-months’ old son of Mr. and Mrs. John Naeger of Zell.

A marriage license was issued this week to Andrew Harter and Elizabeth Obuchon of Coffman.

Born, on Friday, July 9, 1897, to the wife of Mr. Henry Huck of St. Louis, a son.

Married, by Probate Judge Bogy in this city on Wednesday, July 14, 1897, Mr. Fred. W. Frenzel and Miss Ollie Eaton, both of Cape Girardeau. Mr. Frenzel is engaged as miller at the Cone Mills.

Born, on July 6, 1897, three miles east of Farmington, to the wife of T. B. Chandler, a ten pound son. Mr. Chandler was born and raised in Ste. Genevieve county near the Burks school house.

A serious and distressing accident befell the family of Joseph Grieshaber of New Offenburg on last Saturday. Mr Grieshaber was preparing to go to the mill, when one of his young horses came hear the wagon, bothering him. He hit the horse across the back with his hand; the young horse becoming frightened turned and kicked him, hitting him on his breast with both hoofs. He is at this writing in a critical condition, but we hope that the young man will soon be able to be up and about.

Fair Play, July 24, 1897

Born, to Mrs. Walter Ragsdale of St. Mary’s on Wednesday, July 14, 1897, a son.

A son was born to Mrs. Antoine Soto of Ste. Genevieve on Tuesday, July 20th, 1897.

From Sunday’s St. Louis papers we learn a marriage license has been issued to Henry Schilly and Elba Patterson, both of St. Louis.

Born, on Wednesday, August 14, 1897, to the wife of Mr. August Bauman of Ste. Genevieve, a daughter.

Henry Frey, aged 38, died at his home on South Main street, Sunday afternoon, of heart failure. He was up in the forenoon and feeling well, but just after dinner he told his wife that he would go to sleep for awhile. His family thought he was sleeping soundly until they went to wake him, when they found him dead.

Some years ago Mr. Frey and family moved to Ste. Genevieve, Mo., where they lived until about three months ago, when they returned to this place. He was a man well liked, and always made friends wherever he went, and his death is a sad blow to his family and friends.

The funeral services were conducted by Rev. Gruenewald, at the family residence, and the remains were buried in the city cemetery  Tuesday. He leaves a wife and seven children to mourn his death.--DeSoto Press.

Fair Play, July 31, 1897

The five months’ old son of Mr. and Mrs. Steve Aulsberry died of bronchitis on Friday, July 23, 1897. The remains were taken to Jackson, Mo., Saturday for interment.

Mrs. Louis LaRose died at her home at Bloomsdale Thursday morning, July 29, of consumption, at the age of 70 years.

Married, at River aux Vases Catholic Church by Rev. Father A. H. Schaefer on Monday, July 26, 1897, Mr. Andrew W. Harter and Miss Elizabeth Aubuchon, both of Coffman, this county.

We regret to learn that Mr. Charles Govreau of Bloomsdale, formerly superintendent of the county poor farm, was stricken with paralysis last week. His condition is now said to be improved.

The trial of C. C. Wampler, charged with assault and battery on the person of Andrew Silvey, took place before a jury in ‘Squire Babb’s court at Jonca last Saturday and the defendant was acquitted of the charge.

Death Notice.

To all relatives, friends and acquaintances we transmit the sad news that our dearly beloved daughter, Frances Wilhelmina Maria Stuppy, died peacefully in God on Thursday, July 22nd, at the age of 7 months, and was buried in St. Peter and Paul’s Catholic cemetery on Friday, July 23rd. For kind sympathy pray. The grief-stricken parents, Francis Xavier and Wilhelmina Stuppy nee Donze.  St. Louis, Mo., July 27, 1897.

Fair Play, August 7, 1897

Died, at the residence of Mr. Joseph Papin in this city on Tuesday, August 3, 1897, at noon, Mrs. Mary Labruyere, wife of Mr. Antoine Labruyere of River aux Vases. Mrs. Labruyere arrived in our town a week previous on a visit to her daughter and became ill a few days after her arrival. The deceased was forty-eight years old at the time of her death and leaves a husband and seven children to mourn her loss. The remains were interred in the Valle Spring Catholic cemetery on Wednesday.

Minnith News.

James Kenner is talking of going to Alaska with his brother, Dr. Kenner.

The slating of the Catholic Church steeple is being repaired this week. Mr. Robinson of the Hayden Slate Company of St. Louis is doing the job.

The fifteen months’ old baby of Mr. and Mrs. Park Mackley died Tuesday of this week of summer complaint.

Mr. Alfred Shearlock of Festus is seriously ill at Bloomsdale. He was overcome by the heat while at work placing the machinery in the new mill at that place.

The wife of J. M. Jennings of Lawrenceton met with an unfortunate accident last Monday. While riding on a load of hay she fell off of the wagon and one of the wheels ran over her leg, breaking it in two places, just below the knee. A physician was called who set the injured limb and Mrs. Jennings is now doing as well as could be expected under the circumstances.

The August Lenz property in St. Mary’s was sold at administrator’s sale at the Court House in this city on Tuesday of this week. The house and lot sold for $1,825 and the ice house for $150.00. George Bond, Jr, was the purchaser. The sale brought quite a number of St. Mary’s people to our town.

Died, of typhoid fever, at the residence of her son Mr. Henry Thomure in our city on Tuesday, August 3, 1897, at 10:30 P. M., Mrs. Madeline Thomure, nee Moser, aged seventy three years. Mrs. Thomure had been an invalid for years and had not left her room for the past twenty two years. She came to this country from Europe at the age of nine years and was married on April 20. 1847, to Mr. Peter Thomure, who died on February 16, 1895, at the age of 73 years. Eight children were born to them, three of whom are living: Emile, Henry and Mrs. Valle Bell. The funeral ocurred from the Catholic Church on Thursday morning at nine o’clock and was largely attended. The remains were interred in the Valle Spring Catholic cemetery. R. I. P.

Fair Play, August 14, 1897

Two unfortunate accidents occurred at the government quarry at Little Rock this week. On Tuesday morning Adolph Fontan, while working on the bluff, was thrown by falling dirt a distance of forty feet and at this time is still unconscious. His leg was broken above the knee, his head badly bruised, and it is thought he is injured internally. Very little hopes are entertained for his recovery.  Peter Hipes was the other unfortunate man. He was working with a steam drill which got out of order and becoming unloosened form its fastenings threw him on the rocks below, a distance of forty-eight feet, but strange to say, the only wounds he received was a broken ankle and a deep cut in the head. He was never rendered unconscious and is now resting easy and will be able to be up and around as soon as his ankel heals. Both are married men and Mr. Fontan has four small children. Five men have been thrown from the bluffs since the quarry started in operation, two of whom were killed almost instantly.

Mr. George Hurst recovered his stolen skiff this week. It was found at Festus, newly repainted, and brought here by the constable Tuesday. The skiff was stolen from Moreau’s Island about three weeks ago.

Born, on Wednesday, July 28, 1897, to the wife of Mr. Charles Trautman of Ste. Genevieve, a daughter.

Born, on Monday, August 2, 1897, to the wife of Mr. Nicholas Ritter, a daughter.

Weingarten Items.

William Miller of San Antonio, Texas, is here on a visit to relatives.

It is rumored that Captain Andrew Miller intends to move to Ste. Genevieve; we do not like to see the old gentleman leave us for he always was a kind neighbor.

Born, on Thursday, August 5, 1897, to Mr. and Mrs. John N. Donze, a son.

On Monday, August 9, 1897, to Mr. and Mrs. Aloyisious Lutz, a son.

Fair Play, August 21, 1897

Frank Anderson and William Harbaugh were arrested at Brickey’s Mill in this county Wednesday charged with stealing a skiff and engine fixtures from Gus. Meissner of Bushburg. A warrant was issued charging the men with grand larceny and they were placed in jail at this place. They will probably be sent to Hillsboro for trial as the sheriff of Jefferson county was notified of the arrest Wednesday.

Adolf Fontan, who was injured by falling from the bluff while working at the government quarry at Little Rock Landing on Tuesday of last week, died of his injuries Saturday morning, August 14, 1897, at ten o’clock, without regaining consciousness. Mr. Fontan was thirty-eight years of age and leaves a wife and four small children.  He was a man of quiet by pleasant disposition and made friends with all whom he met. The funeral occurred on Sunday afternoon and was held under auspices of the Knight’s of Pythias Lodge of which he was an honored member. The members of the Lodge marched in a body to his funeral and conducted the ceremonies at the grave.

An inquest was held before ‘Squire Cox on Monday and the jury, composed of Paul L. Lempke, Joseph Weiler, John Koetting, George Steigle, Ed. Blandford and John Okenfuss, brought in the following verdict:

We, the jury, having been duly sworn by Wm. F. Cox, Justice of the Peace, and acting Coroner of Ste. Genevieve county, diligently to inquire and true presentment made, in what manner, and by whom Adolph Fontan, on the 14th day of August, 1897, came to his death, after having heard the evidence, and upon full inquiry concerning the facts, and a careful examination of the said body, do find, that the deceased came to his death by being thrown, on the 10th day of August, 1897, from the ledge of rock, where he was engaged in the discharge of the duties of his employment at a condenser, connected with a steam drill, by the falling of earth, displaced by a dynamite charge and which fell about eight minutes there after upon said Fontan, carrying him to the base of the bluff and inflicting injuries upon him from which he died; and we further find that said quarry is not conducted with sufficient regard for the safety of its employees in this, that men are put to work immediately underneath places where of her men are engaged in loosening and throwing down earth; stumps of trees, and stones; and that a sufficiently close and careful inspection is not made, after firing of shots and before men are placed to work immediately thereunder; and that deceased’s death is largely due to a failure to properly inspect the result of the shots fired in the earth before starting up the steam drill at which deceased was working, thereby placing him in a place of danger, and giving him no warning that this earth was liable to fall on him.

Born, on Tuesday, August 17, 1897, to the wife of Mr. James Moore of this city, a daughter.

A daughter was born to Mrs. Charles C Jokerst of Ste. Genevieve on Thursday, August 18, 1897.

Born, on Thursday, August 19, 1897, to the wife of Mr. Grafton Rickard of Ste. Genevieve, a daughter.

Mr. George Hurst has traded his house and lot and livery stable in Ste. Genevieve for property in St. Charles, Mo., and will shortly move on Moreau’s Island. He left for St. Charles last Sunday accompanied by his wife to see his new property.

Jesse Clark, colored, was arrested in St. Mary’s and fired for brutally beating a boy of fourteen years of age. He was brought to town Monday by Marshal Richards and lodged in jail at this place.

Probate Judge Bogy’s court was busy Monday trying the case of Mrs. Lavina Haney who sued her father’s estate for $700, claimed as services for seven years prior to her father’s death. She was represented by Attorney Abernathy of Farmington and Attorney E. A. Rozier was on hand for the defense.  The case was given to the jury at ten o’clock that night, but they could not agree and were discharged by the judge next morning. The attorneys then agreed to let Judge Bogy decide the case. He allowed Mrs. Haney $400 where upon Mr. Rozier took an appeal to the Circuit Court.

Died, of typhoid fever, at 12:30 P.M., at the residence of Mr. Elliot Drury in Bloomsdale, Mr. Alfred Shearlock, aged 50 years, six months and 17 days. Mr. Shearlock had been ill for four weeks. He went from Festus, his home, to Bloomsdale, to place the machinery in the new flour mill at that place and while there contracted typhoid fever from which he died on the day stated. The remains were taken to Festus on Thursday and interred in the Christian cemetery. He leaves a wife and six children to mourn his loss. The deceased was a brother of Mrs. Sephis Thomure of this city and of Hon. John F. Shearlock of Farmington.

Fair Play, August 28, 1897

George Ignatious, the ten month’s old son of Mr. and Mrs. Vincent Schwent, died on Sunday, August 22nd. The remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery at Valle Spring on Monday afternoon.

Married, at the Catholic Church in this city on Wednesday, August 25, 1897, by Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout, Alfred Amoreaux and Emma Lewis, both colored.

Marriage licenses were issued this week to August Kuehne and Theresa Bahr, John Geiler and Katie Valle, Alfred Amoreaux and Emma Lewis of Ste. Genevieve; Frank Kohler and Anna Gerstner of Zell and Leon Kramer of Mount Olive, Ill, and Caroline Morice of River aux Vases.

Death of an Aged Lady.

Mrs. Rachel Ballard died at her home near Libertyville, St. Francois county, Mo., July 29th, 1897, aged 88 years, 5 months and 20 days. Mrs. Ballard was a daughter of Wm. Hist (difficult to read, may not be Hist) and was born in Cape Girardeau county, Mo., February 9th, 1809. Mrs. S. Hutchison of Jackson, Mo, is her youngest sister, and is the only surviving member of a family of ten children, and she is now 82 years old. Miss Rachel Hist was married to James Ballard on the 18th of November, 1830, and they moved to Ste. Genevieve county in 1842, where they lived up to the time of Mr. Ballard’s death, which occurred in 1872, at the age of 81 years, the widow remaining on the old homestead until her death.  Six children--two sons and four daughters--were born to them, and there have been 32 grandchildren and 30 great grandchildren. Of these, all but one daughter, two grand-daughters and nine great-grandchildren survive her.

James Ballard was born in Culpepper county, Va., February 14, 1791; removed with his parents to the Territory of OHio in 1800; and was in the war of 1812 and was surrendered to the British at Detroit by Gen. Hull and taken to Quebec where he was paroled. The war having ended before he was either exchanged or discharged, he often jokingly remarked that he supposed he was still a British prisoner. In Ohio, in 1816, he was elected Sheriff of Madison county and the family still have the commission issued to him by Gov. Thomas Worthington and Secretary of State J. M. Sine, dated November 27, 1816.

Grandma Ballard was interred in the family burying ground July 30th, Eld. James R. HIcks conducting the services, she having been a faithful member of the Christian Church for many years.  Eighty-eight years of toil and sorrow; now eternal rest, peace, joy and gladness--Farmington Times.

Born, on Thursday, August 25, 1897, to Mrs. Sam Mathews of River aux Vases, a daughter.

Born, on Saturday, August 14, 1897, to the wife of Mr. John Heil of Ste. Genevieve, a son.

Born, on Thursday, August 25, 1897, to the wife of Mr. Steve Roth of this city, a son.

Minnith News.

Henry Scott, who was so badly stabbed a few weeks ago, is still confined to his bed.

The four months’ old daughter of John and Ida McKee died the 19th inst.

Born, to Mrs. Lewis Defani, a boy.

Fair Play, September 4, 1897

Married, during mass at the Catholic Church in this city on Tuesday, August 31st, 1897, Mr. August Kuehne and Miss Theresa Barh, both of Ste. Genevieve. Rev. Father Barh of St. Louis, brother of the bride performed the ceremony. Anthony and Cecelia Barh, were groomsman and bridesmaid. After the ceremony a fine wedding dinner was served at the residence of the bride’s father, Mr. Martin Barh. (transcriber’s note--the surname of this family is Bahr, not Barh as published).

John Sullivan, a stranger, was arrested Tuesday charged with stealing seventeen bushels of wheat from James Pinkley and selling it at St. Mary’s. He plead guilty to the charge and implicated Barney Tyler, a colored man. Tyler was arrested Wednesday and entered a plea of not guilty. He was tried before ‘Squire Cox Thursday and fined $20 and costs. Sullivan was also fined the same and both men are now serving their sentences out in the county jail.

David Camelia, a man employed at the government works across the river, was accidentally drowned at four o’clock last Monday afternoon while in the discharge of his duty. All efforts were made to recover his body but without success. The man is said to have been employed as a fireman in St. Louis for eight years and is well spoken of by his employers.

Later--The body was recovered Thursday night and shipped to St. Louis Friday for interment.

Misses Kate and Pearl Jokerst attended the marriage of Mr. Walter LaRose and Miss Mary Jokerst at Bloomsdale Tuesday of this week.

Born, a few days ago, to the wife of B. McDaniel, a 12 pound boy. Sept. 1st 1897.

Born, on Friday, September 3, 1897, to Mrs. Henry J. Janis, a daughter.

Born, on Wednesday, Sept. 1, 1897, to the wife of Mr. William Reich of this city, a son.

Marshal Berry expects his blood hounds to arrive here from Texas about the 20th of this month.

Married, at the Bloomsdale Catholic Church, on Tuesday, August 31, 1897, by Rev. Father Busch, Mr. Walter LaRose and Miss Mary Jokerst, both of Bloomsdale.

Mr. Jules Drury of Kelso writes us that Mrs. Louis Dannenmoeller (difficult to read), formerly Mary Drury, daughter of Mrs. and Mrs. Jules Drury, is now recovering from a severe case of appendictus. Five doctors were present when an operation was performed. The apendix and also an abcess was removed. The operation was successful and she is now awaiting the wound to heal.

William Schleuter, a Carondelet dairyman, came here Monday night to claim the two cows which were stolen from his pasture last week by the men Marshal Berry had so much trouble in arresting at Little Rock Sunday, August 22nd. The men  are at present in jail here serving out a sentence for assaulting an officer, and will probably be taken to St. Louis to stand trial for stealing the cows.

Fair Play, September 11, 1897

Born, on Monday, September 6, 1897, to the wife of Dr. J. B. Roberts, a daughter.

On Thursday, September 9, 1897, to the wife of Wm. Bell, a daughter.

On Thursday, September 2, 1897, to the wife of Adolph Thomure of St. Louis, a daughter.

On Wednesday, September 8, 1897, to the wife of David Mackley, a daughter.

On Monday, September 9, 1897, to the wife of Frank Basil, a daughter.

On Thursday, September 9, 1897, to the wife of D. W. Anthony, a daughter.

Married, during Mass, at the Catholic Church in this city on Tuesday morning, September 7, 1897, at eight o’clock, Miss Anna Seitz of Ste. Genevieve and Mr. Emil J. Sutter of Salisbury, Mo. Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout performed the ceremony.  Miss Clara Seitz and Mr. Wm. Sutter were bridesmaid and groomsman. A wedding reception was held at the residence of Mr. Valentine Seitz, the bride’s father, during the day and a host of friends called to offer congratulations. The young couple will leave for Salisbury tomorrow where Mr. Sutter is in business and will make that place their home.

Miss Louise Grobe died at the residence  of her mother in this city on Thursday , September 9, 1897, of typhoid fever.

Dr. W. W. Scott sold his house and lot in Ste. Genevieve to Charles Bauman this week and moved his family to Kinsey where he purchased a farm from P. J. Primo.

Weingarten Items. The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. B. McDaniel died on Wednesday of last week.

Fair Play, September 18, 1897

Died, at Festus, Mo., at 9:30 o’clock p.m., on Sunday, September 5, 1897, at the residence of his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Gottlieb Kammerer, Albert Freddie Gottlieb Stratman, the ten months’ old son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Stratmann.  The funeral services were held at the German Lutheran Church in Festus on Tuesday afternoon at two o’clock.

Died, at River aux Vases on Wednesday, September 15, 1987, Mrs. William Vogt, aged 20 years, 7 months and 19 days.

John W. Sullivan, who was arrested and placed in jail at this place a couple of weeks ago for stealing wheat from James Pinkley, was removed to the Madison county jail at Fredericktown last Saturday by the sheriff of Madison county. He is charged with horse stealing in Bollinger county and escaped from the Fredericktown jail last June.

Later:--Sullivan plead guilty in the circuit court at Marble Hill and was sentenced to two years in the penitentiary.

Weingarten News.

Mrs. Anton Bieser of New Offenburg is seriously ill this week.

Died, at the residence of Andrew Hogenmiller on Saturday, September, 1897, Joseph May, aged 77 years. The deceased was for many years an intense sufferer from rheumatism. The remains were interred in the Weingarten Catholic Cemetery on Sunday where a large concourse of friends and relatives followed him to his last resting place. Rest in peace.

The eight months’ old son of Mrs. Dr. S. F. Thurman of Blackwell, formerly Miss Grace Skewes of this city) died on Tuesday, 7th inst. The remains were interred at Farmington the following Thursday.

Married at the Catholic Church in this city on Tuesday morning during eight o’clock mass, by Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout, Mr. John Geiler and Miss Catharine Valle.

Died, on Saturday, September 11, 1897, Joseph Amoreaux, (colored) aged 60 years. The remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery on Sunday afternoon at four o’clock.

A thief broke into the residence of Joseph Scherer Tuesday while the family were away from home and stole seventy-five cents in silver and a few pocket handkerchiefs.

Fair Play, September 25, 1897

Mrs. Memie Schaefer was arrested and placed in jail here Monday charged with disturbing the peace. She was fined $1 and costs and released on Thursday.

Prosecuting Attorney Stanton went to Jonca yesterday to try the case of Zim Hunt and David Graff, charged with disturbing religious worship in Saline township.

Marriage licenses were issued this week to August J. Hurst of Beauvais township and Mary M. Kettinger of Weingarten, and to Frank Maurice and Emily Govreau of Bloomsdale.

Died, of blood poisoning, on Saturday, September 18, 1897, at her home in Danby, Mrs. Jacob Laiben, aged 59 years. The remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery at Bloomsdale on Sunday.

George Cleveland, charged with petit larceny, and Macager Thurman, charged with obtaining goods under false pretenses, were lodged in jail here this week. Both men were indicted by the last grand jury.

Sheriff Williard Rariden of Farmington came here Monday to convey Joel Gordon to St. Francois county where he is indicted for seduction. Gordon gave bond for his appearance at the St. Francois county circuit court.

A team of mules belonging to Mr. John Viox ran away on Market Street Sunday morning, creating considerable excitement. Two of Mr. Viox’s sons were thrown violently to the ground and the wagon passed over one of the boys hurting him quite seriously. The other boy escaped with a few slight bruises.  Mrs. Viox remained in the wagon until the frightened team was stopped and was not injured. The wagon was badly damaged. A dead cow was being dragged to the river behind the wagon and this scared the team and caused the run away.

A daughter was born to the wife of Mr. W. J. Boyer of Bloomsdale on Monday, Sept. 20th.

Born, on Tuesday, September 21, 1897, to the wife of Mr. Peter Hipes of Ste. Genevieve, a son.

Died, Rose Marie, the three weeks’ old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Anthony C. Rozier of St. Paul, Minn.

The Albert Boyer property was purchased at trustee’s sale Friday by Mr. Joseph Oberle for the sum of $525.

Married, in St. Louis on Tuesday, September 21, 1897, Mr. William Colgan and Miss Genevieve Skewes, both of this city.

From the St. Louis papers we learn that Henry Braun has been appointed postmaster at Weingarten to succeed S. B. Donze.

Fair Play, October 2, 1897

Marshal Berry received a letter this week from Texas stating that his blood-hounds could not be shipped at present on account of the yellow fever quarantine in that state.

Born, on Tuesday, Sept. 28, 1897, to the wife of John Aulsbury, a daughter.

On Monday, Sept. 27, to the wife of Wm. Siebert of New Bremen, a daughter.

On Wednesday, Sept. 29, 1897, to the wife of Louis White (colored) a daughter.

The sad news reached here Thursday evening of the unfortunate accident that befell Leon, the youngest son of our friend, Mr. John Gremminger of Zell. Leon, while at work crushing corn, had the misfortune to have his hand caught in the crusher with the result that the hand will have to be amputated above the wrist.

An unknown man was found dead in a field of Andrew Braun’s who lives about seven miles from here last Saturday morning. He had spent the Wednesday previous at Mr. Braun’s house and complained of being ill at the time. When discovered in the field by Mr. Braun his face and head was so badly eaten by the hogs he could hardly be recognized.

Held Up and Robbed.

Monday evening some time Louis Mack, a negro went to the home of old man Pauley, living about three miles and a half from St. Mary’s, and assaulted the old fellow, beating him up badly, after which he robbed his victim of all he had--$9.33. A telegram was received here a couple of hours after the deed was committed, and deputy sheriff Wm. Schufert, Willis Gaile and Wm. Mathis started out in search of the negro. No trace of him could they find, but they afterwards learned that he had crossed the river to Chester from Claryville.

We hear people remark that the old man was of ill repute, and hence the negro ought not be molested. Admitted that the first part of the assertion is true, does not follow that such desparate characters as this negro should be given full away. If such acts pass without protest does it not encourage others and incite them to crime. Who knows who his next victim may be. The character of the victim does not excuse the crime.

There are a number of desperate negros in Ste. Genevieve county and quite a few of them may be found in the vicinity of St. Mary’s. We think if a few of them were treated to a sea-grass necktie the county would be better off. Perryville Sun.

On last Friday night a man by the name of Charles Schaefer died suddenly at Little Rock landing while waiting for the north-bound boat for St. Louis. The coroner was notified and an inquest was held over the remains. The verdict was death from heart failure. The body was embalmed by Koetting & Hunold and shipped to St. Louis for interment.

Weingarten News.

Mrs. Frank J. Schuler of St. Louis arrived on Friday to attend the Hurst-Kettinger nuptials.

A daughter was born to Mrs. F. X. Gegg on Thursday, September 23, 1897.

On Tuesday, September 28, Miss Mary Kettinger of this place and Mr. A. Hurst of St. Mary’s were married at the Weingarten Catholic Church, Rev. Father Muehlsiepen officiating. The groom is one of St. Mary’s most prominent citizens and the bride is one of Weingarten’s most popular young ladies. She has taught the Herman school for three years successfully. The young couple will make their home with the groom’s parents in St. Mary’s.

Fair Play, October 9, 1897

Born, on Saturday, October 2, 1897, to the wife of Mr. Francis Govreau, a daughter.

Died, of diphtheria, on Friday, October 1st, 1897, the four year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Roth. The remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery on Sunday.

Diphtheria has made its appearance in Ste. Genevieve and our board of health are using all precautions to prevent the spread of the disease. At Farmington the schools are all closed on account of the disease.

A man by the name of Patrick Conner died at the government headquarters at the Little Rock landing on Sunday afternoon at two o’clock of inflammation of the bowels. The remains were interred in the city cemetery at Valle Spring on Monday afternoon.

Mrs. Nicholas Wiebury died suddenly at her home at River aux Vases on Wednesday night, at twelve o’clock of heart failure, aged about 42 years. The remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery at River aux Vases Thursday morning at ten o’clock. The deceased was a sister of Mr. Andrew Siebert of this city.

Fair Play, October 16, 1897

Born, on September 18, 1897, to the wife of Mr. Adam Buenniger of Kinsey, twins--both boys.

Born, on Tuesday, October 12, 1897, to the wife of Dr. G. M. Rutledge of this city, a son.

Anton Weiler, who has been employed as salesman at Jokerst Bros & Yealy’s store, left for Festus Sunday to accept a position in Ralph Panchot’s tailoring establishment.

The six months’ old child of John Buehler, who lives near the River aux Vases, died Sunday, 10th inst. The remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery at Valle Spring on Monday morning.

Weingarten Items.

A son was born to Mrs. Leo Hogenmiller on Sunday, October 10, 1897.

On last Friday this community was shocked by a telegram announcing the death of Mrs.  Paul Braun of St. Louis. The body of the deceased was brought down on Friday night and taken to Wendle Hogenmiller’s residence in New Offenburg from whence the funeral was held Sunday after High Mass. A large concourse of friends and relatives followed the remains to her last resting place. Mrs. Braun was the youngest daughter of the late Roman Vogt of River aux Vases and was highly respected by all who knew her.  One year ago last April she was married to Paul Braun of St. Louis where she resided at the time of her demise. The the bereaved husband and relatives of the departed we extend our heartfelt sympathy.

Died, of diphtheria, on Tuesday morning, October 12, 1897, Angeline, beloved daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Louis Girard of this city, aged five years and two months. The remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery on Wednesday.

News reached here Thursday of an attempted assassination at Coffman, this county, Wednesday night. Mr. John Gegg was called to his door about midnight Wednesday and as soon as he appeared at the door received a shot in the left groin. His assailant then set upon him with a knife and cut him in several places. His wife, hearing the shot and scuffle, ran to his assistance and was also seriously cut about the body. News of the affair is very meager but from what we can learn suspicion rests on an adopted boy of Mr. Gegg’s who had some trouble with the family and left after making threats to get even, it is alleged. A description of the boy was telegraphed to Sheriff Straughan Thursday afternoon by Sheriff Rariden of Farmington. Mr. Gegg and his wife are both said to be in a very serious condition.

Married, in St. Louis, on Sunday, October 10, 1897, Miss Alice Dehe of this city and Mr. J. R. Woods of St. Louis. The couple departed for Urbana, Ill., after the marriage ceremony to reside there in the future.

Fair Play, October 23, 1897

Died, at her home on the Plank Road on Monday, October 18, 1897, Mrs. Margaret Spies, aged 78 years.

George W. Lalumondiere has moved his family from Pierron, Ill., to Prairie du Rocher where he has been engaged as principal of the school.

During a fight at a ball given at the residence of Mr. Killian Jacobs near Weingarten Monday night Lawrence Jacobs, his son, received a stab in the back, and the knife penetrated the lungs. Parties from the vicinity were in town Wednesday but no one seems to know who used the knife. Mr. Jacobs will recover.

William Rhyne, the boy who stabbed Mr. John Gegg and his wife at Coffman on Wednesday night of last week, was captured at Mine LaMotte and brought to this place by the sheriff of Madison county Tuesday evening and placed in jail. The boy talks freely of his crime and confessed to everything, telling how he had watched his chance to enter Gegg’s house, and gives no other reason for his act than that he had been treated badly by Mr. Gegg. A reward of $100 had been offered for his capture which was promptly paid over to the sheriff of Madison county. He claims to be only sixteen years old, but parties who know him well say he is at least eighteen years of age. Mr. and Mrs. Gegg are not both said to be out of danger.

Died, in this city at noon on Tuesday, October 19, 1897, of Bright’s disease, Mrs. Herman Lelie, aged 77 years, nine months and 19 days. Mrs. Lelie, whose maiden name was Alida van Veen, was born at Gorinchem, Holland, and came to America with her husband in 1849. they settled in Ste. Genevieve in 1854. Her husband died April 6, 1896. The deceased leaves two sons, Herman of St. Louis and Emile C. of this city to mourn her loss. Mr. Lelie of St. Louis is seriously ill and was therefor unable to attend the funeral of his mother which occurred from the Catholic Church on Wednesday afternoon at three o’clock. The remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery at Valle Spring and were followed to the grave by a large concourse of sorrowing relatives and friends.

Born, on Saturday, October 16, 1897, to the wife of Mr. J. F. Rozier of this city, a son.

On Saturday, October 16, 1897, to the wife of Mr. Joseph Boehle of this city, a son.

On Thursday, October 7, 1897, to the wife of Mr. Anton Wipfler of Zell, a son.

On Friday, October 15, to the wife of Mr. James Todisman of this city, a daughter.

On Tuesday, October 19, 1897, to the wife of Mr. Ed Linderer of Ste. Genevieve, a daughter.

Mrs. Andrew Muessig, Sr. died at her home near Weingarten on Wednesday, October 20th.

Married, on Wednesday, October 20, 1897, at the Catholic Church in this city, Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout officiating, Louis Robinson and Mrs. Rosa Luder, both colored.

Died, on Tuesday morning, October 18, 1897, of membraneous croup, Jules, the five year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Max Bader. The remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery at Valle Spring on Wednesday morning at nine o’clock.

Mr. George Lalumondiere and Miss Caroline Sexauer were married at the Catholic Church in this city on Monday afternoon, October 12, 1897, at three o’clock by Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout. Thomas Lalumondiere and Miss Dora Boyer acted as groomsman and bridesmaid. The wedding was very private, only the immediate relatives being invited.

Fair Play, October 30, 1897

A son was born to the wife of Mr. August Bauman on Monday, October 11.

Marriage licenses were issued this week to Frank T. Harter of Coffman and Cora B. Conns (difficult to read) of Farmington, and Chas Basler of Bloomsdale and Josephine Iseman of Weingarten.

Died, on Tuesday, October 19, 1897, at her home in Weingarten, Mrs. Anna Margaretha Muessig, nee Kettinger, aged wife of Andrew Muessig, Sr. aged 65 years, one month and one day.

Mrs. Muessig was the oldest daughter of Franz Joseph Kettinger, one of Ste. Genevieve county’s pioneers. She was born in Freudeenberg, Germany, September 18, 1832, and on November 22, 1853, she was married to Mr. Andrew Muessig who with one of her sisters, Mrs. Lorenz Ponder (difficult to read, may not be Ponder), and one brother, William Kettinger, survive. To the union were born seven children one boy and six girls. One girl, Catharina, died in infancy while Andrew, Regina, Theresa, Mary, (Mrs. Frank Hermann), Elizabeth, (Mrs. F. M. Hogenmiller) Sophy, (Mrs. Joseph Bauman) and two adopted sons Lawrence and Charles Kettinger, remain to mourn the loss of a tender and devoted mother. The mortal remains were interred in the Weingarten cemetery amidst an enormous concourse of relatives and friends.

Rev. Father Muehlsiepen officiated at High Mass and preached a very impressive sermon. May she rest in peace.

Weingarten Items.

Born, to the wife of John Boehle, Jr., a daughter.

Lawrence Kettinger of Ivy Landing, Ill., arrived here last Saturday to visit his aunt, Mrs. Andrew Muessig, Sr.

Last Monday night Frank Jacobs gave a ball. During the evening some of the guests got into a dispute about trifles, whereupon a free for all fight ensued. Knifes and stones played a prominent part. After peace had been restored it was found that Lawrence Jacobs was seriously stabbed in the back. Medical aid was summoned at once.


A son was born to Mrs. A Schenz and one to Mrs. Henry Schwent on Tuesday October 19, and a daughter to Mrs. Joseph Grieshaber on Sunday, October 24.

Joseph Bieser and family went to Farmington Saturday to attend the Niedert-Burbaugh nuptials.

Died, suddenly in Peoria, Ill., Mr. Charles Klein, formerly of this county, but now of St. Louis. The remains were interred in the St. Peter and Paul’s cemetery in St. Louis on Wednesday afternoon at two o’clock.

Married, on Wednesday, October 20, 1897, at the Catholic Church in this city, Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout officiating, Mr. Evariste Strausburg and Miss Dora LaRose, both of this city.

Born, on Monday, October 4, 1897, to the wife of Mr. William Klein, Jr., a daughter.

Fair Play, November 6, 1897

Born, on Thursday, November 4, 18987, to the wife of Mr. Charles Rottler of this city, a daughter.

Shortly after midnight Wednesday fire broke out in the residence of Mrs. Mary Valle on Second street and the cry of fire soon brought a crowd to the scene. The engine was promptly gotten out and in less than half an hour the fire was extinguished. The damages to the property will amount to about $75,00 which is fully covered by insurance. The fire was caused from the breaking of a lamp. Mrs. Emily Boyce, while on her way downstairs, caught her foot in the carpet and fell with the lamp in her hand. The lamp broke, scattering the oil in all directions, and in a moment the room was a mass of flames and only the prompt arrival of the engine saved the house from destruction. Thus again it is proved that the engine purchased by the city council has on more than one occasion paid for itself.

Born, on Monday, November 1, 1897, to the wife of Mr. John W. Schwent of this city a daughter.

Died, of membraneous croup, on Wednesday, November 3, 1897, Charles Thomas, the six year old son of Mr. Henry Staeckle of this city. The remains were interred in the Valle Spring Catholic cemetery Thursday morning at ten o’clock.

It is reported in town this week that Lawrence Jacobs, who was stabbed during a fight at a ball near Weingarten a couple of weeks ago, is in a dangerous condition. So far, no one seems to know who used the knife.

Fair Play, November 13, 1897

Born, on Friday, November 5, 1897, to the wife of Mr. B. A. Roy of  Bonne Terre, a son.

While compiling cars at the Government Quarry at Little Rock Wednesday Amos Todisman had the misfortune to break a bone in the wrist of his right hand.

Married, a Mass at the Catholic Church in this city by Father C. L. van Tourenhout on November 9th, 1897, Joseph A. Schwent and Miss Caroline Grass.

An operation for membraneous croup was performed on the six year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Singley last Sunday and at this time the child is doing very well. The physicians in attendance were Doctors Lanning and Rutledge of this city and Falk of St. Louis.

Died, on Tuesday, November 9, 1897, of membraneous croup, Bertha Genevieve, the only child of Mr. and Mrs. August Hemmelgorn, aged four years, five months and twenty-five days. The remains were interred in the Valle Spring Catholic cemetery Wednesday morning.

Married, on Wednesday, November 10, 1897, by Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout, Mr. Paschal Moreau and Miss Ludwina Siebert. Miss Annie Siebert and Mr. Henry Moreau were bridesmaid and groomsman. After the marriage ceremony the bride and groom and members of both families repaired to the new home of the wedded couple where a fine wedding supper was served after which a reception was held. Mr. and Mrs. Moreau are now domiciled in their new home. They have our best wishes for a happy life.

Sheriff Straughan accompanied by Treasurer Louis Naumann went to Booneville last Sunday to convey William Rhyne to the reform school at that place. He was sentenced at the last term of circuit court and given three years for assault with intent to kill John Gegg of Coffman.

Weingarten Items.

Dr. Carssow of Ste. Genevieve was called to Lawrence Jacobs’ one day this week to attend to Mr. Jacobs’ wounds received at the ball some weeks ago. Mr. Jacobs is still in a precarious condition

Miss Lena LaRose is very sick with typhoid fever.

Mr. Charles Basler of Bloomsdale and Miss Josephine Isenman of Weingarten were married at the Catholic Church on Tuesday, November 9, 1897. Rev. Father Muehlsiepen officiated at the ceremony.

Fair Play, November 20, 1897

Died, of dropsy, on Monday, November 15, Mrs. Joseph Muehlauesler, aged 62 years. The remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery at Valle Spring Wednesday morning after a High Mass had been sung for the repose of the soul by Rev. C. L. van Tourenhout.

Died, at his parental home in Zell on Monday, November 5th, 1897, at about
12 o’clock at noon, Charles, the beloved and oldest son of Louis A. and Theresa Jokerst, aged 16 years, 8 months and 9 days. The funeral took place in the Catholic cemetery at Zell Wednesday morning at 9:30 o’clock, after a Requiem High Mass for the repose of the soul, Rev. Father Pigge officiating. A large funeral procession escorted the remains to their last resting place. The deceased had been sick with typhoid fever about ten   days prior to his death which resulted in a hemorrhage. Dear Charley you have left us,
And our loss we deeply feel;
But ‘tis God who has bereft us,
He can all our sorrows heal.
Yet again we hope to meet thee,
When the stay of life is fled;
Then in Heaven with joy to greet thee,
Where no farewell fear is shed.  Uncle Harry.

Died, of typhoid fever, at Zell, on Thursday, November 18, 1897, Mr. Charles Flieg, aged about 27 years. The remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery at Zell on Friday morning.

Twins, both boys, were born to the wife of Mr. Martin Ziegler of St. Louis (formerly Miss Nannie Valle of this city) on Thursday, November 11th. One of the children died the following day.

Weingarten Items.

John Jacobs of Chicago is here on a visit to his brother Lawrence who is still in a very critical condition.

Fair Play, November 27, 1897

A son was born to Mrs. Paul Bond of this city on Tuesday, November 23, 1897.

Born, on Sunday, November 21, 1897, to the wife of Mr. Ed. Nanny of this city, a daughter.

From the St. Louis papers of Thursday we learn that a marriage license has been issued to Valentine Rottler, Jr., and Miss Lizzie Faller.

Mr. Bossier Guignon, brother of our former Circuit Clerk Jules B. Guignon, died at his home in St. Louis last Friday, November 19, 1897, at 5:30 A.M. of neuralgia of the heart, aged fifty-seven years. The remains were interred in Calvary cemetery, St. Louis on Saturday.

Mr. George Crane went to St. Louis last week to attend the funeral of his mother Mrs. Martha Crane, who died in that city last Friday, 20th inst. Mrs. Crane spent last winter with the family of her son in Ste. Genevieve and made many friends while here who will regret to learn of her demise.

Mr. John Gegg of Coffman, who was murderously assaulted by young William Rhyne about a month ago, was in town Wednesday and called at our office. Mr. Gegg’s wounds are healing slowly but he is glad that he escaped with his life. Young Rhyne, it will be remembered, was sent to the Reform School at Booneville on one charge, and still has an other indictment hanging over his head.

A Sad Accident.

A very sad accident which resulted in the death of William, the fifteen year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph G. Hoffman of our city, occurred last Sunday morning about 10:30 o’clock. IN company with his younger brother and Charlie Bader, the boys started out after the early mass to hunt rabbits. They were out for some time and finally reached the orchard of Mr. Max Bader where they decided to rest and eat apples. In stooping down to pick up an apple, the hammer of the gun, which Willie held in his hand, struck a pine box and the gun exploded, emptying the entire contents in his head and tearing a large portion of the skull away. A physician was immediately called and everything possible was done to save the young boy’s life, but at seven o’clock that evening he breathed his last and death relieved him of his sufferings.

The deceased was a kindhearted boy and a favorite with his companions and school mates. He had just reached that age when he could be of considerable help to his parents, who have the sympathy of the entire community in their sad misfortune.

The remains were interred in Catholic cemetery at Valle Spring on Tuesday morning after a requiem mass for the repose of the soul had been sung by Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout. He was a member of the Young Mens’ Sodality and the members of that order marched in a body to the grave.

DEATH OF AN OLD CITIZEN.

Mrs. Odile M. Janis, one of Ste. Genevieve’s oldest citizens, departed this life at her residence in our city on Saturday, November 20, 1897, at 5:30 o’clock P.M. after an illness of several weeks.

Mrs. Janis, whose maiden name was Odile LeClere, was born at the Simon Burgert place about five miles north of Ste. Genevieve, on November 5, 1811, and was therefore 86 years and 15 days of age at the time of her death. In 1829 she was married to Mr. Henry Janis, who departed this life on the 1st day of September, 1872.

Eight children were born to this union , all of whom are dead excepting Mrs. Charles H. Gregoirs of Dubuque, Iowa, who was present at the bedside of her mother when she breathed her last.

Shortly after their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Janis moved to Fredericktown, Mo., where they lived until the close of the war; they then removed to Ste. Genevieve and resided here up to the time of their death.

The deceased had been in poor health for several  years, but she bore her sufferings with patience and fortitude. She was a kind and charitable disposition and held the love and respect of a large number of friends and relatives. Always a strict and practical Catholic, she received the last rights of the Church before her death and was well prepared to meet her Creator.

The funeral occurred from the Catholic Church on Monday morning after a funeral High Mass for the repose of the soul had been sung by Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout. The remains were followed to their last resting place in the Valle Spring Catholic cemetery by a large concourse of sorrowing relatives and friends.  R. I. P.

Fair Play, December 4, 1897

Paschal Moreau, who has been seriously ill with pneumonia for the past week is, we are glad to state, improving.

Smith S. Boyce of St. Louis arrived here Monday. He has been suffering with malaria for several months and will remain here until he regains his health.

The three year old son of Mr. Peter Weiler died of diphtheria on Tuesday, November 30, 1897. The remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery on Wednesday morning.

Mr. Edwin E. Sluder died on Thursday, November 25, at Santa Fe, New Mexico, at the age of fifty six years. The remains were taken to St. Louis and interred on Tuesday, November 30, at two o’clock P. M. in Bellefontaine cemetery. Mr. Sluder was a resident of our city for several years and was well know by many of our citizens. He was a brother in law of Mr. Frank LaGrave.

Mrs. Simon Burgert, who lives about five miles north of Ste. Genevieve, is reported seriously ill.

Born, on Friday, November 5, 1897, to the wife of Mr. Conrad Meyer of Ste. Genevieve, a daughter.

Born, on Saturday, November 27, 1897, to the wife of Mr. Henry N. Gisi of Ste. Genevieve, a daughter.

Weingarten Items.

Mr. Frank Grieshaber and Miss Rosina Grither were married at the Weingarten Catholic Church Thursday, November 25, 1897, Rev. Father Muehlsiepen performing the ceremony. The writer wishes the young couple a long and happy life.

John Mayer of Mobile, Ala, passed through our burg Monday on his way home from some of the northern states. Mr Mayer is an itinerant tinner and in spring travels up the Mississippi Valley overland doing odd jobs from house to house, and in autumn, when cold weather sets in, he returns to the sunny south, the same way. The old gentleman is as jolly as ever, and we wish him many happy returns of his annual trip.

A son was born to Mrs. Jos. Herman, Jr., some time ago.

Fair Play, December 11, 1897

Died, on Friday, December 3, 1897, of diphtheria, Clara Lena, the five year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Herzog of this city.

Mr. T. J. Wells and Miss Lavina Pullam, both of Renault, Ill., were married by Probate Judge John L. Bogy on Thursday, December 9th.

Married, on Thursday, December 9, 1897, by Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout, Mr. M. Sipole and Miss Minnie Cambron, both of Moreau’s Island.

A son was born to Mrs. Robert Abernathy of this city, on Tuesday, December 7, 1897.

Born, on Monday, December 6, 1897, to the wife of Mr. James Berry of this city, a daughter.

Weingarten Items.

August Govreau is on the sick list.

We are very sorry to state that Lawrence Jacobs is still in a very dangerous condition. As will be remembered Mr. Jacobs was feloniously  assaulted and stabbed in the back by some unknown miscreant at a ball several weeks ago.

Fair Play, December 18, 1897

Born, on Friday, December 10 1897, to Mrs. Bernhardt Fallert, a son.

Married, on Thursday, December 16, 1897, by Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout, Charles Randal and Mary Ann Janis, both colored.

Died, on Wednesday, December 15, 1897, the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Louis Brown of this city. The remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery at Valle Spring on Thursday.

Weingarten Items.

The Babb school house at Jonca was burned to the ground last Tuesday night.

Stones for the new church steeple were hauled from the quarry this week.

Bloomsdale News.

Twin boys were born to Mrs. Octave LaRose on December 10, 1897. Mr. LaRose is a Democrat and if McKinley runs for President again in twenty one years, he’ll fall short of two votes.

A nuptial wedding took place at Prairie du Rocher last Wednesday, between Mr. Frank Charleville of that place and Miss Sophie Billy of Bloomsdale. A long and happy life is our best wishes to them.

Mr. Joseph Brischle, our new wagon maker has built a fine shop. He has ll the work he can handle. Mr. Brischle is an expert wagon maker and we are pretty sure the result of his enterprise at this place will be successful.

Fair Play, December 25, 1897

Died, in St. Louis, of consumption, on Monday, December 13, 1897, Mr. Herman Lelie, aged 50 years. The deceased was a brother of Mr. Emile C. Lelie of this city.

Born, on Friday, December 10, 1897, to Mrs. John Basler of this city, a son.

A daughter was born to Mrs. C. L. Bryan of St. Louis, (formerly Miss Memie Boyce of this city) on Thursday, December 16th.

Born, on Friday, December 17, 1897, to the wife of Mr. August Giesler, a daughter.

A daughter was born to Mrs. Jos. Schmiederer of River aux Vases one day last week.

Born, on Wednesday, December 22, 1897. to Mrs. Charles Meyers of this city, a daughter.

The infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Zeriack Wipfler died on Thursday, 23rd inst. The remains were interred in the Valle Spring Catholic cemetery on Friday morning.

Marriage licenses were issued this week to August Streibel and Mrs. Francis Braun, and to Anton Henni and Mrs. Caroline Bahr.

News was brought to town Thursday that Fred Obuchon, employed as mail carrier between French Village and Valle Mines, was thrown from his horse and killed last Tuesday while on his way to Valle Mines. The body of Mr. Obuchon was found shortly after (illegible) and taken to his home where (illegible) that night (illegible).

Geo. W. Lalumondiere of Prairie du Rocher writes us as follows: “Our dear baby, Urban (or Urbau), died Thursday morning, December 16, of pneumonia and inflammation of the bowels, aged 1 year, 4 months. Our next youngest is in bed with pneumonia and the other two with tonsilitis.”

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