Fair Play; 1895 (Jan 5 – Dec 23)

Fair Play, January 5, 1895

Miss Rachel L. Seysler of this city was married at Dallas, Texas, on Thursday, December 27, 1894, to Mr. G. M. Harris of Fort Sill, O. T.

 

Rev. Father L. Dufour of Freeport, Ill., spent last Saturday and Sunday in Ste. Genevieve visiting old friends and acquaintances. Father Dufour was born in Ste. Genevieve, but left here at the age of ten years and this was his first visit to his old home since that time.

 

Hypolite Derousse, of Prairie du Rocher, who wound up a drunken debauch Christmas morning by setting fire to his dwelling, left for parts unknown as soon as he realized the enormity of his crime. The house belonged to his father, Edmond Derousse, and was consumed, with all its contents, involving a loss of over $3000.

 

Born.

On Monday, December 31, 1894, to Mrs. William Ziegler of this city, a daughter.

 

On Monday, December 31, 1894, to Mrs. August Harte of this city, a daughter.

 

On Tuesday, December 25, 1894, to Mrs. Wendolin Rottler, of this city, a son.

 

On Friday, December 28, 1894, to Mrs. Columbus Abernathy of this city, a son.

 

On Tuesday, January 1, 1895, to Mrs. George Todisman, a daughter.

 

A girl baby born to Mrs. Gus Burgert of this city on Saturday, December 29, 1894, died at birth.

 

A daughter born to Mrs. Frank Wipfler of this city on Monday, December 24, 1894, died at birth.

 

Death From a Wheat Barb.

James Harrow, a convict at the prison, died from a most peculiar cause one day last week.

 

About six months ago Harrow was received at the prison and until about three months ago enjoyed as good health apparently as any of the convicts in the institution. About three months ago, he began to complain occasionally of pains in the stomach, and simple remedies were administered which appeared to relieve the man for some time. The pains would return, however, and in a more violet form each time. About three weeks ago, he was taken violently ill and was sent to the hospital where Dr. James waited upon him. The man’s stomach began swelling and everything was done to relieve him from his intense pain, but to no purpose. No cause could be discovered for the peculiar symptoms and the man died. A post mortem examination was held in which is was developed that the viscera was badly inflamed and swollen. The cause was finally discovered--a small wheat barb which had evidently gained entrance into the abdominal cavity through the umbilicus. How long the barb had been working into the system can only be a matter of conjecture. There is no doubt, how ever, but that the barb gained entrance to the abdominal cavity before Harrow was received at the prison here.--Chester Tribune.

 

Fair Play, January 12, 1895

Mr. John Buehler and Miss Katie Armbruster were married at St. Mary’s on Monday last, January 7th.

 

Mr. Anthony Sucher purchased the lot opposite Meyer’s Hotel this week from Mr. William W. Wilder for the sum of $1300.

 

Several of our saloon-keepers are harvesting ice this week. The ice is said to be six inches thick.

 

Judge Gilbert, one of our oldest and most esteemed citizens, celebrated his 86th birthday on Jan. 1. His two sons from Cairo, Messrs. W. B. and M. F. Gilbert, were present to congratulate him in his advanced age and make him feel cheerful and happy. They were all tendered a serenade by the “Moonlight Orchestra: Tuesday night.--St. Mary Progress.

 

The citizens of Festus held a mass meeting and organized the Festus Glass Bottle Factory, with $20,000 capital. F. W. Brickey was made President. The factory will be built at once.

 

Mr. I. M. Davidson, one of the most prominent and wealthy men in Buttler county, died at his residence in Poplar Bluff, on January 3, 1895.

 

Died, of bronchitis, on Friday, January 11, 1895, Naumann Bauman, infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Bauman of this city, aged 4 months and 3 days.

 

Mr. A. J. Burks and Miss Susie McCoun were united in marriage at the home of the bride in Farmington on last Monday at two o’clock, Rev. Josephus Stephan officiating. Only the near relatives and intimate friends of the couple were present. The bride is the daughter of Thos. H. McConn, a well known business man of our city. She is one of Farmington’s most popular and highly respected young ladies. The groom is the son of Hon. Jasper N. Burks. He is a promising and energetic young man and has been engaged in business in St. Louis for several years. He has many friends in Farmington. Immediately after the marriage ceremony the couple left for St. Louis where they will reside in the future.--St Francois Herald.

 

Marriage Licenses.

During the year 1894, fifty-seven marriage licenses were issued in this county. Below is the list in full:

 

Anton Kiest and Dina Stevens of Beauvais Township.

Smith Pullen and Ellen Carron of Jackson.

Louis Lux and Effie Simino of Ste. Genevieve.

Wm. Bauman and Clara Viox of Ste. Genevieve.

Louis A. Rigdon and Lizzie A. Vogt of Beauvais.

Jos. L. Pratte and Mary Caldwell of St. Mary’s.

Christopher Darien and Bertha Doerge of Ste. Genevieve.

Wm. J. Chandler and Lila Berry of St. Mary’s.

Chas T. Eckenfels and Catharine Braun of Ste. Genevieve.

August Harte and Fannie Sexauer of Ste. Genevieve.

Ralph Rimboch and Lucy Boarman of St. Mary’s.

Wm. Basler and Mary Friedman of Beauvais.

B. G. Eichenlaub and Bridget Huck of Ste. Genevieve.

Henry N. Gisi and Mary J. Weiler of Ste. Genevieve.

James Boland and Ann McKee of Beauvais.

Jacob Hurka and Louise Schwent of Ste. Genevieve.

F. X. Huber and Lidia Weber of Union.

Henry J. Janis of Ste. Genevieve and Emma LeCompte of St. Louis

Eli Govro and Theresa Schwartz of Beauvais.

Antoine Moro and Libby Bell of Ste. Genevieve.

Frank Bahr and Christine Schweigert of Ste. Genevieve.

I. S. Hermann and Pauline Hoog of Ste. Genevieve.

F. X. Kohm and Celia S. Winter of Ste. Genevieve.

David Becquette of Jackson and Susie Tullock of Bonne Terre.

Clovis Govereau and Pearl Stolte of Ste. Genevieve.

Charles A. Dunaway and Louise R. Kern of St. Louis

Chas. Siebert and Ellen Miller of Beauvais.

F. A. Bieser and Mary Grass of Beauvais.

Henry T. Carron and Emily Carron of Jackson.

Wm. D. Reeder of St. Louis and Amanda Thomure of Ste. Genevieve.

Henry Schwent and Louisa Weiler of Ste. Genevieve.

Nathan L. Brown and Laura Spray of Ste. Genevieve.

Augustine Naeger and Catharine Palmer of Beauvais.

Irving Byington and Cora Williams of Beauvais.

Nicholas Klein and Caroline Doll of Ste. Genevieve.

Peter Bookholtz and Ellen Werner of Jackson.

Wm. Vineyard and Mary Sewald of Jackson.

F. X. Hoog and Agatha Naeger of Ste. Genevieve.

Jos Naeger and Rosina Wolk of Ste. Genevieve.

Clarence Rudloff and Mary T. Harter of Beauvais.

Max Bader and Sophia Rudloff of Ste. Genevieve.

E. W. Geer and Mary Kenner of Beauvais.

Eli Boyer and Sophia Carron of Jackson.

Burrow Wagener of Festus and Mary Lajois of Ste. Genevieve.

Frank Rozier and Cecelia Schaaf of St. Mary’s.

Alexis F. LaRose and Ellen Beyat of Bloomsdale.

Charles Baum and Alice Boyer of Ste. Genevieve.

Joseph Smith and Philomena Roth of Beauvais.

Lawrence Roth and Catherine Roth of Beauvais.

August Schilly and Philomene Lalumondier of Ste. Genevieve.

Wm. Oberle and Mary Andre of Ste. Genevieve.

Frank Samson and Annie Grass of Ste. Genevieve.

Christian J. Naumann and Elizabeth Klein of Ste. Genevieve.

Charles H. Biel and Sophia Petrequin of Ste. Genevieve.

Benj. Effrein and Annie Karl of Ste. Genevieve.

James L. Field and Louise A. Pratte of Saline.

John Buehler and Katie Armbruster of Ste. Genevieve.

 

Fair Play, January 19, 1895

A daughter was born to Mrs. Herman Weber of Kehl, on January 7th, 1895.

 

Born, on Tuesday, January 8, 1895, to Mrs. Edward Linderer, of Ste. Genevieve, a son.

 

Born, on Tuesday, January 15, 1895, to the wife of Mr. Seph. Carron, of Lawrenceton, a son.

 

Born, on Saturday, January 12, 1895, to the wife of Mr. Frank Beauchamp of this city, a daughter.

 

The Hayden House at Cape Girardeau was destroyed by an incendiary fire. Loss $1,200.

 

The wife and child of Mr. Ray, a butcher, while crossing Black River bridge at Poplar Bluff last Friday, fell through and were drowned. They were going to visit friends. The husband did not know of the accident until Sunday, when he went to the friend’s house to seek his wife.

 

A telegram was received last Sunday in Ste. Genevieve conveying the news of the serious illness of Mr. Adolph Rozier of New Orleans. Later news states that he is considerably improved in health.

 

From the St. Francois county papers we learn that a marriage license has been issued to Mr. John F. Shearlock and Mrs. Matilda Beard.

 

We understand Mr. Anthony Sucher will soon begin the erection of a blacksmith shop on the lot purchased from Mr. William Wilder last week.

 

Chicken thieves are at work again. Last Tuesday night several hen-houses were visited in Coopertown, but the thieves were disappointed as the houses were all securely locked, but they met with better success on Thursday night. Mrs. Mary Operle’s chicken-house was entered on that night and several of the finest chickens carried away.

 

A cold wave struck this section last Friday night and on Saturday the river was full of floating ice, consequently we received no mail Saturday evening. Monday the mail arrived about eight o’clock. The thermometer on Saturday morning registered two degrees below zero. The Mississippi is clear of ice at this place but is frozen over at Grand Tower and Chester, and also a mile or two above here.

 

Bloomsdale News.

Typhoid fever is all over in this vicinity and we are glad to see the several young ladies, who had been ailing with the dread disease during forty days, up on their feet again.

 

The creamery at this place started on the 8th inst,, superintended by Mr. Henry Bush of Concordia, Mo. Mr. Bush is an expert butter maker as is proved by the fine butter made since he is running this creamery. Mr. Joseph Bader is his assistant. The creamery is running every other day with an average of about 1600 lbs of milk.  The amount of milk is increasing rapidly and by spring the amount will undoubtedly be doubled. The milk averages about 4 1-2 lbs. of butter to the 100 lbs. It is bought at $1.00 per 100 lbs. There is strong hope that the enterprise will be a success, and it surely cannot fail if everybody takes an interest in it.

 

Fair Play, January 26, 1895

A daughter was born to Mrs. Joseph Bogy of St. Louis on the 5th inst.

 

Born, on Thursday, January 24, 1895, to the wife of Mr. Alex Brown of this city, a son.

 

Born, on Friday, January 25, 1895, to Mrs. Henry J. Janis of Ste. Genevieve, a daughter.

 

Born, on Monday, January 21, to the wife of Mr. Evariste Burgert of this city, a daughter.

 

Mrs. Daniel Garin of St. Louis arrived here Thursday to attend the funeral of Mr. Frank Pratte.

Mr. Valle Nettleton of Duquoin, Ill, attended the funeral of Mr. Frank Pratte in this city yesterday afternoon.

 

The marriage of Hon. John F. Shearlock to Mrs. M. E. Beard of this city, took place at the residence of Mrs. Moore in Farmington on Tuesday January 8th, at two o’clock P. M., Rec. Father O’Riley officiating. The ceremony was performed in the presence of a few invited friends, after which all repaired to the dining room where delicious refreshments were served. The couple then immediately departed in a carriage which was waiting for them, to the home of Mr. Shearlock’s daughter, Mrs. James Cunningham, several miles north of Farmington, where they remained a couple of days. They are boarding with Mrs. Moore at present, but will soon go to house keeping on Liberty street. Each of the couple has many friends who wish them much happiness and prosperity. Mr. Shearlock is now engaged in the merchandise business in Farmington.

 

Mr. Frank Pratte died in this city on Wednesday morning, January 23, 1895, at seven o’clock at the advanced age of eighty-one years.

 

Mr. Pratte was born in this county, January 5, 1813, but spent the greater part of his life at Valle Mines where he superintended the lead works of that place. In company with his wife he removed to Ste. Genevieve from St. Louis some three years ago to reside with his sister, Mrs. Odile Valle, who preceded him to the grave only five months. On November 6th, 1838, Mr. Pratte was married to Miss Cora Cox who still survives him. No children were born to this union.

 

Before his death the deceased received the last rites of the Catholic Church and the remains were interred in the Valle Spring Catholic cemetery at one o’clock yesterday afternoon.

 

The Force Band of this city presented their instructor, Mr. Naree LaChance, with a beautiful silver plated cornet on Wednesday of this week as a mark of appreciation in which he is held by them. On the cornet is the following inscription:  “Presented to Naree LaChance by the Force Band of Ste. Genevieve, Mo., January 23, 1895.” Naree is an efficient and painstaking teacher and well deserves this compliment.

 

Three Continuances and a Discharge.

Kennet, Mo., Jan. 19---The case against Chas. Wear, charged with the murder of a railroader named Lael, at Poplar Bluff, in 1892 came to a sudden end here without a trial by Special Judge Maulden. The case came here on a change of venue. It had been continued several times, and today counsel for Wear moved his discharge under the statue that says a defendant shall be discharged when three continuances have been taken by the State. Defendant is a son of Judge John G. Wear of this circuit, who was disqualified from sitting in the case.  The defense was represented by Hon. Martin I. Clardy, Judge Dining and a son of Solicitor Cochran of the Missouri Pacific system. Mr. Renfrow, Prosecuting Attorney of Butler County, was alone for the prosecution, though the Attorney-General of Missouri sent an assistant, Mr. Jourdan, here in 1893 to look after the case.

 

A new fashion that is just beginning to grow in vogue is that of writing letters in pencil rather than with pen and ink; and when once it is fairly established it is doubtful whether anything but legal documents and business papers that must be preserved will ever be prepared in the old style. Letters are generally shorter nowadays than they formerly were, and more hastily written, more frequent and seldom worth keeping for any length of time. They are not the elaborate efforts of bygone days, that were often cherished for their intrinsic worth. The pencil, which is far more convenient than the pen, is, therefore, talking its place in the great mass of casual correspondence

 

A Saloon-Keeper Robbed.

John Wilkerson, of Herculaneum swindled by Confidence Men.

 

John Wilkerson, who owns a saloon and boarding house at Herculaneum, Mo., and a saloon at Bonne Terre, is worth $700 less this morning than he was yesterday, all because he backed a fake foot race down at Herculaneum. Fred Hergott, alias “Sawdust Jack,” Sam Doss, John Haughan, Tom Robinson and another individual, all noted confidence men, composed the crowd who brought the rural saloon keeper to grief. Hergott is now under arrest at Carondelet, but the other four, with the most of Wilkerson’s money, are still at large. It was about noon yesterday when the five men showed up within the confines of Herculaneum and prepared to work the olden game. Everything was quiet in the village, and Wilkerson seemed to be about the liveliest citizen in view with the quintet filed into his place and commenced to talk foot races. “Sawdust Jack,” being an acquaintance of the proprietor, quietly took him aside and told him of the “good thing” he had in prospect, and induced him to go in on it. Being a thrifty citizen, of accretive tendencies, the saloon man was not long in staking the race, and the party repaired to the track. Wilkerson had put up $700 before he suspected anything, and tried to call the race off. Sam Doss was the stakeholder and refused to give up the money. He and his confederates walked off laughing Wilkerson followed them to Kimswick, where they boarded a freight train.

 

”Sawdust Jack” was arrested early last night, but the others have not yet been apprehended. Wilkerson came to the city last night, and told his troubles to Chief Desmond, and promised to call again this morning to see what developments have been made. He appears to have great confidence in “Sawdust Jack,” who, he says, will return the money.

 

Doss and the other members of the crowd are well known confidence men, and this is only one of the many games they have played. Last summer and fall they made a tour of the county fairs in Southern Illinois and secured many victims. In November Doss visited Murphysboro, Ill., and fleeced a hotel-keeper out of $600 in a race similar to that of yesterday.  During the St. Louis Fair in October these men and others frequented the resorts about  Sixth and Elm streets and reaped a veritable harvest by means of dice from rural visitors who had flocked to the city for a week’s vacation.--Globe Democrat.

 

Fair Play, February 2, 1895

Born, on Monday, January 28, 1895, to the wife of Mr. Franz Jenny of this city, a daughter.

 

A son was born to Mrs. Henry N. Gisi of Ste. Genevieve on Wednesday, January 30, 1895.

 

Born, on January 7, 1895, to the wife of Mr. Cyrus Wilson of Ste. Genevieve, a son.

 

Born, on Sunday, January 27, 1895, to the wife of Mr. Joseph Hoffman of Ste. Genevieve, a daughter.

 

Mrs. Leon Kreittler died at her home near River aux Vases last Saturday. The remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery at Weingarten on Sunday.

 

Captain Jas. Pell, Sr., who was one of the pilots of the steamer State of Missouri, which sunk last week, but off watch at the time of the disaster, his son and partner being at the wheel, was one of the pilots of the steamer Robt. E. Lee on her famous race from New Orleans to St. Louis in 1870.

 

The old adage of steamboatmen is verified again that whenever one steamer meets disaster two others will certainly follow in a few days. First the Boaz struck the bank at Harrisville, Ky., last week; then the sinking of the State of Missouri near Alton, Ind., Saturday evening, and the third, the Nat. F. Dortch, sank in Red River, 14 miles below Alexandria, La., Saturday night.

 

Dr. George Bois, who came to this city about a month ago, was arrested last week for practicing without a license and his trial placed for Monday, January 28th, but the doctor took his departure on foot last Sunday and has not been heard of since.

 

Mr. Eli Lalumondiere, for many years a resident of this county, died at the residence of his daughter, Mrs. Charles Klein, in St. Louis on Thursday of last week. The deceased was a brother of Messrs. Felix and Peter Lalumondiere of this city.

 

A few days ago Mr. Valentine Rottler received a letter from his brother-in-law, Mr. Michael Seitz of Middlebrook, in which it was stated that Mr. Charles Reinhard of Boston died on January 9th. Mr. Reinhard and Mr. Rottler were school-mates. They came to this country about forty-five years ago from Baden, Germany. Mr. Reinhard settled in Boston, where he married an Irish lady. They lived a happy life together and by his hard work and the good management of his loving wife, they became very wealthy. He leaves his wife, two sons and two daughters. About three years ago, Mr. Rottler visited Mr. Reinhard at Boston and from there went to New York where he met two other school mates, named Mr. Hahn and Mr. Stortz. Both gentlemen are known here and came to Ste. Genevieve about six years ago to visit Mr. Rottler, and Mr. Hahn was here last summer. Mr. Seitz reports that Mr. Stortz is very sick.

 

The stockholders’ meeting of the Ste. Genevieve Brewing & Lighting Association held at Union Hall on Monday, January 28th, brought out a very full attendance and the election of directors for the endsuing year was participated in by almost every stockholder. It resulted in the unanimous selection of the following gentlemen: Valentine Rottler, Francis L. Jokerst, Louis Nauman, William W. Wilder, Charles W. Hamm, Edward A. Rozier and Joseph Weiler. The report made by the Secretary of the business transacted during the past year was well received especially when it showed that, not withstanding all the difficulties the management had from poor fuel, short supply of water, and the general lack of experience, the results of the six months sale of beer were a handsome profit. It would certainly seem that the company has made some money during this period, that its future success is assured. All that is needed is that the people of our city should give it their hearty support, and failure will be impossible.

 

Fair Play, February 9, 1895

Will Pinkerton, the Chester tombstone man, was in town Wednesday.

 

Born, on Monday, January 21, 1895, to the wife of Mr. John J. Vaeth of Ste. Genevieve, a son.

 

A daughter was born to the wife of Mr. Charles Rehm of this city on Sunday, February 3, 1895.

 

Born, on Sunday, February 3, 1895, to the wife of Mr. Conrad Meyer of Ste. Genevieve, a daughter.

 

From Wednesday’s St. Louis papers we learn that a marriage license was issued on Tuesday to Mr. George O. Kempf and Miss Maud L. Denoyer.

 

A petition signed by five hundred citizens of DeSoto was sent to Senator R. G. Madison at Jefferson City last Tuesday asking that he do what he can to defeat the bill relating to baseball and other games of amusement on Sunday.

 

Mr. Charles Quinette, for many years clerk on the steamer Emma C. Elliott, died at his home in St. Louis Tuesday, February 5, 1895. The deceased was a brother-in-law of Mr. Ed. Singley of this city.

 

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Kern celebrated their Crystal Wedding last Sunday. We understand that Mr. August Kern and wife will celebrate their Crystal Wedding tomorrow.

 

Miss Laura McHenry died at the County Farm last Sunday, February 3, 1895. The remains were interred in the Valle Spring Catholic cemetery on Monday.

 

Harry Hart and wife of DeSoto, Mo., were seriously injured while coasting. Hart lost control of the sled and it collided with a tree.

 

Fair Play, February 16, 1895

Died, on Saturday, February 9, 1895,of congestive chills, Mrs. Felix Brugers. The remains were interred in the Valle Spring Catholic cemetery on Sunday afternoon.

 

Mr. Bernard Difani of St. Mary’s died at his home at that place on on Tuesday, February 7 1895, at 9:15 P. M., of heart trouble, at the age of sixty-four years. Deceased was a member of the J. Felix St. James Post G. A. R. of this place.

 

The Ditch Murder.

Festus, Mo. Feb. 8--Steward Hampton arrested at Fredericktown for forgery, has informed the Prosecuting Attorney of evidence sufficient to arrest John Cole and Milt and Basil Sweet, for the murder of Saloonkeeper Ditch, November 25, 1894.

The preliminary trial will be held at Festus before Squire Henderlight Wednesday.

 

The slowest trip that ever was made by a steamer from New Orleans to St. Louis was made by the Maid of Iowa in 1846. She was purchased by the Mormons, who bought her for the special purpose of transporting them up the river. Her time from port to port was 30 days. Morris Brady was her pilot.

 

One of the children of Dr. and Mrs. L. Albert Brands died at their home in Prairie du Rocher at 3:30 o’clock last Monday afternoon. The child was a boy and it died of diphtheria. The Doctor and his wife have the sympathy of many friends.--Chester Clarion.

 

Sam Doss, the fake foot racer was sentenced to the Chester penitentiary for five years at the Murphysboro term of circuit court last week. On his way to jail he escaped from the guards but was recaptured the next day.

 

Died, on Wednesday, february 13, 1895, of consumption, Miss Jessie Strausberg, aged about 18 years. The remains were interred in the Valley Spring Catholic cemetery on Friday morning.

 

Mr. Jules Rozier, Sr., of St. Mary’s has been appointed administrator of the estate of Mrs. Odile Valle, deceased, to fill the vacancy caused by the death of Mr. Frank Pratte.

 

Clippings from our Exchanges.

 

Evansville, Ill., has a new paper.

Chester is having a water famine at present.

The Gold Cure Institute at DeSoto is a success.

There are but six prisoners in the Cape Girardeau jail at present.

A hypnotist named Fontana is amusing the citizens of Cape Girardeau with his numerous tricks.

One broken leg and an ugly wound in the head is the result of last week’s coasting in DeSoto and now the city marshall has issued an order discontinuing coastings on all street crossings.

 

Fair Play, February 23, 1895

Mrs. Anna Vorst and Mrs. James Moore went to St. Mary’s Wednesday to attend the funeral of Mr. Jeff Moore.

 

Mr. J. Moore, a member of the J. Felix St. James Post, G. A. R., of this city, died at his home at St. Mary’s last Monday.

 

Died, on Wednesday, February 20, 1895, of pneumonia, Mr. Louis Lewis (colored) aged 72 years. The deceased had been blind for forty years previous to his death. The remains were interred in the Valle Spring Catholic cemetery on Thursday afternoon at four o’clock, Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout performing the ceremony.

 

Saturday in Judge Allen’s office there was a quiet wedding, the parties having come here from Farmington. They registered at the Gregory House as Mr. and Mrs. N. O. Mackly and remained here until Monday when they left for Ste. Genevieve on a visit to relatives.  Fredericktown Democrat.

 

The marriage of Miss Constance Rozier of this city and Mr. Paul Bond of Perryville will take place at the residence of the bride’s parents in Ste. Genevieve at nine o’clock this morning. After the ceremony the wedded pair will leave for Perryville to reside in the future.

 

John Heil, who was adjudged insane sometime ago, was taken to the asylum at Fulton last Monday by Deputy Sheriff Vorst and Mr. Jules Petrequin.

 

Died, at his home in this city of general dibility, on Saturday, February 16, 1895, Mr. Peter Thomure, aged seventy-four years. Mr. Thomure had been ill for some time and his death was not unexpected. He was the son of Gabriel Thomure and Emilie Bequette, who were among the first settlers of Ste. Genevieve.  The deceased leaves a wife and three children, Messrs Emile and Henry Thomure of this city and Mrs. Valle Belle of St. Louis, besides a large number of grand children. Mr. Thomure held the respect of all who knew him and leaves a large number of friends to mourn his loss. The remains were interred in the Catholic cemetary at Valle Spring on Sunday afternoon at four o’clock, Rev. C. L. van Tourenhout performing the last rites. R. I P.

 

Fair Play, March 2, 1895

Mr. J. A. Kingsland, the well-digger, is seriously ill at his home at Farmington.

 

A son was born to Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Hauck of this city on Monday, February 25 h.

 

Born, on Tuesday, February 26, 1895, to the wife of Mr. John W. Schwent of Ste. Genevieve, a son.

 

The post office at Halifax in St. Francois county was burned to the ground Tuesday night of this week.

 

It is rumored that there are several cases of small pox at DeSoto, Bonne Terre and Valle Mines.

 

 

Henry Huck, manager of the Southern Hotel, who has been ill for some time, is now up and around.

 

Nich. Jokerst departed for St. Louis by land Thursday to accept a position as night watchman on the steamer Belle Memphis.

 

Mrs. James Shaw died at her hone in this city on Thursday afternoon, February 28, 1895, of inflammation of the bowels, at the age of forty-six years. The deceased had been ill since last May. She leaves a husband and three children, two girls and one boy, to mourn her loss. The remains will be interred in the Valle Spring Catholic cemetery at nine o’clock this morning.

 

Mr. John Classen, who was married in St. Louis last week to Mrs. Katie Will of this city, returned home Wednesday and was treated to a “chiravarie” by a number of his friends. Mrs. Classen will make her home in St. Louis.

 

Miss Barbara Kammerer, daughter of Mr. G. Kammerer, formerly a tinner at this place, was married at Festus on Tuesday, February 26, to Mr. Charles Stratman of that city.

 

Died, of pneumonia, on Tuesday morning, February 26, 1895, Camilla Mack, aged 23 years. The remains were interred in the Valle Spring Catholic cemetery on Wednesday afternoon.

 

Louis White and Hattie Mack, both colored, were married last Tuesday, February 26, 1895, by Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout.

 

Mr. Joseph Archambeault, who was engaged for many years at Barr’s Dry Goods store and who was well known in Ste. Genevieve, died at his home in St. Louis on Friday, Feb. 22, at the age of fifty-six years.

 

Sheriff Biel and daughter, Miss Minnie, departed for Bonne Terre Thursday to visit Mrs. Frances Clevlen, who is reported to be dangerously ill. Mrs. Clevlen is a daughter of Mr. Biel.

 

Died, quite suddenly at 9:30 o’clock A. M. on Monday, February 25, 1895, at her home in Zell, Mrs. Sophia Lucretia Hermann, wife of Dr. Theo. Hermann, after a protracted illness of dropsy of the heart, aged 49 years, 11 months and four days. The remains were interred in the cemetery of St. Joseph’s Church, her grave being next to her mother’s who died two months ago. Mrs. Hermann was born in Elingen, Wurtenburg, in 1843 and came to this country with her husband in 1871, living for some years in Illinois, and moved to Missouri in 1876. She leaves a husband and one child, a daughter, to mourn her loss. May she rest in peace.

 

Married.

The marriage of Miss Constance Rozier and Mr. Paul Bond occurred at the residence of Mayor C. C. Rozier in this city last Saturday morning, February 23, 1895, at 8:30 o’clock. The ceremony was performed by Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout and was witnessed only by the immediate family. Miss Marie Rozier, sister of the bride, acted as bridesmaid and Mr. Sam Bond was groomsman.

 

A wedding breakfast was served after the marriage and the happy pair then took their departure for Perryville where they will reside in the future.

 

The bride is the second daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles C. Rozier and was one of Ste. Genevieve’s most charming and popular young ladies. The groom is a son of Mr. George Bond, Sr., formerly of St. Mary’s but now residing in St. Louis. He is at present superintending the Schaaf elevator at Perryville and is a young man of excellent habits and good business qualifications. Mr. and Mrs. Bond have our best wishes for their future happiness. Quite a number of beautiful wedding presents were received.

 

Those who attended the wedding from abroad were Miss Lucie Rozier, Anthony and Benj. Rozier and Joseph Bond of St. Louis, and Mr. George C. Bond of St. Mary’s.

 

In Memoriam.

Departed this life on Wednesday February 13, 1895, Miss Jessie M. Strasburg, aged 18 years, 10 months and 26 days. Deceased was a daughter of Mrs. Herman Strasburg. Her father preceded her to the grave several years ago. Jessie was a sufferer from typhoid fever which grew into consumption and was the cause of her sad and untimely demise. She was a model girl and was esteemed by all.  Friends of the family visited her former home to take a parting glance at the dead and the face seemed more beautiful and calmer than it had been in any time of recent years. The shapely hands were crossed upon the shroud and from between the cold fingers a crucifix glistened in the rays of the wax candles that trembled at the coffin head.

 

Miss Jessie was during her life a fervent, practical Catholic and a regular communicant of our church  wherein the funeral services were preached. There were several floral tributes of remembrance tastefully displayed in the chamber of death.  (lengthy editorial not transcribed).

 

The funeral took place Friday morning after a low mass had been sung by Father van Tourenhout for the repose of her soul, and was largely attended considering the extreme cold weather. The pall bearers were Misses Lena Winston, Marie Stanton Katie Thomure, Maggie Kenard, Mable Falk, Elenore Bogy, Dora LaRose and Mamie Bell.

 

Fair Play, March 9, 1895

Born, on Monday, February 25, 1895, to the wife of Mr. George W. Lalumondiere of eAst St. Louis, Ill., a son.

 

It is rumored in town that Messrs. John Koetting and Anton Hunold will soon embark in the undertaking business.

 

We understand that Mr. Frank Beauchamp, Jr., has purchased the house and lot of Mr. Joseph Jokerst for the sum of $800.

 

Bob Flamm came down from St. Louis last Sunday morning to spend a few days with his mother, Bob generally spends the winter at his old home in Ste. Genevieve, but secured a birth on the Tennessee River boats this year and was kept busy all winter. Next Wednesday he will go out on the City of New Orleans as second clerk. The New Orleans will have a crew composed of four former Ste. Genevieve citizens: Captain, Charles Ziegler; Second Clerk, Bob Flamm; Third Clerk, Eloy LeCompte; Barkeeper, Ed. Huber.

 

River aux Vases will soon have a new saloon. Nicholas Joggerst was granted a dramshop license this week by the county court and will open for business on April 1st. Ste. Genevieve county now supports fourteen saloons; nine in Ste. Genevieve, two at St. Mary’s, two at River aux Vases and one at Bloomsdale.

 

Mr. George W. Lalumondiere of East St. Louis will be in our town on Monday, March 11. Pianos and organs cleaned, tuned and repaired for two dollars and upwards. Work guaranteed.

 

Mr. Charles Meyers received a letter this week announcing the sad news of the death of Peter, the eight-year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Jules Drury of Kelso, Scott county. The child died of pneumonia on Monday, March 4th.

 

Mrs. Leonard Bauman died this week. The remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery at Weingarten on Tuesday morning after a funeral High Mass had been sung for the repose of the soul by Rev. Father Huttler.

 

Mary Jane, the eight year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank X. Huck died of diabetis on Tuesday, March 5th. The remains were interred in the Valle Spring Catholic cemetery on Wednesday afternoon.

 

Died.

Mrs. Louisa Shaw departed this life Thursday, February 28, 1895, at 5 o’clock P. M., of inflamation of the bowels, at the age of 46 years and 8 months.

 

Her death was not entirely unexpected, she having been in very poor health for over a year. Every earthly aid was given her but to no avail. She was a good christian, a faithful wife and a kind and loving mother.  At the bedside of the sick she was a kind attendant and in that way gained many friends who sadly regret her death. The remains were laid to rest in the Catholic cemetery at 9 o’clock Saturday, followed by a large concourse of friends and mourners. the deceased leaves a husband two daughters and one son to mourn her loss.

 

Fair Play, March 16, 1895

Born, on March 4, 1895, to the wife of  Mr. Joseph Flynn of DeSoto, a son.

 

Adolph Stauss was tried before a jury in Probate Judge Rozier’s Court last Tuesday and declared insane.

 

Mrs. Joseph Sucher died at her home near River aux Vases of consumption on Sunday last, March 10th.

 

Mr. Nathan Janis and Miss Rebecca Mackley, both of Ste. Genevieve county, were married at the residence of the bride’s mother on March 3, 1895. A number of friends and relatives were present to witness the ceremony, after which all partook of a fine wedding supper which was much enjoyed. The happy pair will make their home in St. Francois county, to which we welcome them with the hope that their life’s barque may avoid all breakers and bear them safely to a peaceful, serene and contented old age.-- Bonne Terre Register.

 

A telegram was received here Wednesday stating that Mr. Joseph Gettinger had met with a serious accident while working in a saw-mill at Salisbury, Mo., and would probably have to have his arm amputated. His father, Mr. George Gettinger, left for Salisbury on the boat Wednesday night.

 

We are enabled to chronicle this week and occurence that seldom occurs, and therefore is always interesting. On February 28 Mrs. Wm. Dalton, of near Silver Lake gave birth to triplets, all girls. One weighed two pounds and the others two and one half pounds each. Mother and the babies are doing fine and it is thought that the father will survive.--Perryville Republican.

 

Mrs. Pelagie Shearlock, one of Ste. Genevieve’s oldest inhabitants, died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Seph. Thomure, in this city, on Sunday, March 10, 1895, at the advanced age of 83 years, eight months and five days. Mrs. Shearlock, whose maiden  name was Monterville, was born and raised in Kaskaskia, Ill., and hers was one of the first families to settle at that historic spot.

 

She was the daughter of Anthony Montevill and Ellen Donnia. The deceased was the mother of ten children, five girls and five boys, seven of whom are living: Richard, of Festus; Martha, the wife of Mr. Seph Thomure of this city;  Ellen, wife of Mr. John Detchemendy of River aux Vases; John, who is engaged in the mercantile business at Farmington; Henry, an architect in St. Louis; Alfred, in the milling business at DeSoto, and Nancy, widow of Paul Graff of DeSoto. Mrs. Shearlock had always lived a Christian life and she leaves a large number of sorrowing friends to mourn her loss. The remains were interred in the River aux Vases cemetery on Monday.  Chester papers please copy.

 

Fair Play, March 23, 1895

Paul Price.

From the Farmington Herald.

 

The subject of this sketch was born on a farm about three miles east of Coffman, Mo. He was left fatherless at the age of three years, and it was under the watchful care of an earnest mother that his youthful steps were guided. As a dutiful mother should do, she took great interest in the education of her children. When our subject was twelve years old his mother moved to Ste. Genevieve where he attended the public school for two years. She returned to her farm in New Tennessee, where during the summer months young Paul cultivated crops and during the winter months cultivated his mind. The writer has often seen Paul Price following the plows across the fields and has sat with him beneath the roof of the Old Oakland school house, which has become noted for the number of teachers it has produced. Paul afterwards entered the normal at Cape Girardeau, which school he attended for three years. He completed a course of study and received a certificate to teach in the public schools of the state.

 

He began his career as a teacher in Ste. Genevieve county, where he taught three successful terms. Four years ago he was elected principal of the Desloge School in Bonne Terre, a position which he has filled satisfactory ever since.

 

Paul Price is descended from a family noted for their intelligence. His father was for nine years Professor in Greek, Latin and Hebrew in the State University of Missouri.  He was a relative of General Sterling B. Price, the noted Considerate  leader, who was at one time Governor of the state.

 

Married, March 10, 1895, at 10 o’clock A. M., at Avon, Mo, John K. Williams and Miss Hattie L. Sebastian, Rev. E. Coffer officiating. The wedding was rather in the nature of a surprise to the many relatives and friends of the young couple, as they simply rode down, accompanied by a brother and sister of the bride, to Avon and were married with no more ado about it. The bride is the eldest daughter of Judge G. W. Sebastian, and the groom is an energetic young man who has been among us for several years. We join their many friends in wishing them a prosperous and happy voyage over life’s seas.--Farmington Times.

 

Mrs. Doss, wife of Samuel Doss, who was sent to the prison here about a month ago for complicity in a fake foot race at Murphysboro in which John Devine was victimized, was in the city several days the early part of the week. She is making efforts to obtain a pardon for her husband and says she has 150 signers to a petition asking for his pardon. It is not known what success she had in town.--Chester Tribune.

 

Married, on Thursday, March 21st, 1895, by Probate Judge Rozier, Mr. Joseph D. Rose and Miss Elizabeth E. Hughs.

 

Just Opened!

An Undertaking establishment opposite the Catholic Church in Ste. Genevieve, with a New and Clean stock of Coffins, Caskets, Robes, etc, in fact everything needed in that line. All orders will receive prompt attention.  Our charges will be moderate as we are prepared to meet and competition in the Undertaking business. Respectfully Koetting & Hunold.

 

The following is taken from a salisbury paper. We are glad to be able to state that Mr. Gettinger is getting along nicely and is now out of danger.

 

Joe Gettinger, who is employed at the Ginter Bros. saw mill about five miles north of here, happened to a serious accident Wednesday morning about nine o’clock in which he lost an arm.  Mr. Gettinger was carrying slabs away from the mill and in picking up one he turned his back to the saw and started off when one end of the slab got caught in the saw and jerked him back on the log that was being sawed. Gettinger saw his danger but before he could move the worst had come and left him with one arm. The saw struck him from the back cutting his arm off about an inch from the joint in the shoulder. The man came to town and went in Dr. Brummal’s office for treatment. With the assistance of Drs. Baker and Jennings the remainder of the bone was taken out to the joint. The man is resting as easily as could be expected and if blood poisoning does not set in he will recover.

 

Bertrand News.

Mr. Cuningham died a few days ago of consumption.

 

Mr. Bill Davis, Sr., took an over dose of morphine and would have died had not it been for the prompt attention of Dr. Conrad.

 

The Price Ditch Murder.

The preliminary examination of Basil and Milton SweetSteward Hampton, Zeke Dix and Noah Lavara, arrested on a charge of murdering and robbing Price Ditch and setting fire to his saloon at Festus on the 25th of last November, came off at Hillsboro last week. The arrests were made on the confession of Hampton, and subsequently confirmed by the confession of young Dix. the defendants, Lavara and the Sweets, attempted to prove the falsity of the confession of Dix by the evidence of witnesses from Clardy’s saw mill in this county, who testified that Dix was at work there the week prior to the murder and was there the night the murder occurred, and therefore his confession could not be true.  They also had witnesses to testify that they (Lavara and the Sweets) were at home and retired early the night of the murder. The prisoners, however, were held, to await the action of the Jefferson county grand jury. Prosecuting Attorney Abernathy of this county, assisted by Prosecuting Attorney Williams of Jefferson county, conducted the examination on the part of the State, and Frank Dearing is looking after the interests of the defendants.--Farmington Times.

 

Fair Play, March 30, 1895

Born, on Sunday, March 24, 1895, to the wife of Mr. William Bell of this city, a daughter.

Born, on Sunday, March 24, 1895, to the wife of School Commissioner T. A. Bryan, a daughter.

 

Mr. Michael Vieh departed for St. Louis Sunday to attend the funeral of his son Edward, who was buried in that city on Thursday.

 

Died, on Saturday, March 23, 1895, at her residence on the Fredericktown road about five miles from Ste. Genevieve, Mrs. Mary Klein, aged 82 years. The remains were intered in the Catholic cemetery at Zell on Monday by Rev. Father Pigge. The funeral train was one of the largest witnessed in this county. Twelve years ago Mr. and Mrs. Klein celebrated their Golden Wedding; her husband preceded her to the grave eight years. She was the mother of ten children, eight of whom are living: Mesdames Ludwina Wilder, Lizzie Ziebert, Bertha Kohm, Sophia Siebert, Mary Siebert, Wilhelmina Jokerst and Ignatius and William Klein. Besides these children Mrs. Klein leaves a large number of grand children and more than thirty great grandchildren.

 

A Mr. Broad, an agent for a mail contractor, who was in our county for the purpose of subletting the Lawrenceton mailroute, died of pneumonia at the residence of Mr. Joseph Loida in Lawrenceton, on Friday, March 22nd. The remains were taken to Texas where a wife and son survive the deceased.

 

News received here this week states that Mr. Joseph Gettinger, who had the misfortune to lose his arm in a saw-mill accident at Salisbury a few weeks ago, is not improving as rapidly as was at first supposed and is not yet entirely out of danger.

 

Mr. Charles J. Wilder this week sold his house and lot on Main street to Mrs. Laura Skewes for the sum of $1500. About five years ago Mrs. Skewes sold this same property to Mr. Wilder for the same price.

 

Mr. Louis Labruyere was in town this week and told us that the creamery at Bloomsdale was now an assured success. The farmers are all taking a deep interest in the enterprise and from 1,600 to 2,000 pounds of milk are received at the creamery daily. Some of the farmers realized as much as $40 for milk during the month of February. The association is paying 90 cents per hundred pounds for milk.

 

Died, at his home in Ste. Genevieve at six o’clock A. M., on March 26, 1895, of inflammation of the stomach and bowels, Mr. Arsene Girardet, aged sixty-eight years. The deceased was born on February 21, 1827, at Seey, Department Doub, France. In January, 1855, he came to America, landing at New York on the 16th of that month. From there he d rifted into various States following whatever occupation offered itself. In the year 1862 he came to Ste. Genevieve and married Miss Christine Govereau, who bore him five children, two of whom are now living. Mr. Girardet was a practical Catholic and died after having received all the rites of the Church.  The remains were interred in the Valle Spring Catholic cemetery on Wednesday afternoon, Rev. Father Weiss officiating. R. I. P.

 

Diamond Wedding.

An event of unusual occurence quietly took pace in the neighborhood of River aux Vases on March 10, 1895, Mr. James A. Rigdon and his estimable wife Josephine Rigdon nee Kirchner, surrounded by thirteen children celebrated their Diamond Wedding, having been united in matrimony for over sixty years. Some thirty grandchildren and two great-grand children were present to enliven the occasion by their mirthful presence. Few diamonds were found among the presents of this Diamond Wedding, but the presents received were of golden value coming from grateful hearts. The sumptuous dinner served showed that the culinary art had been carefully cultivated by the feminine portion of the Rigdon family and the liquids hailing from our home brewery and Mr. Gisi’s cellars proved themselves equal to the merry occasion. Outside the atmosphere was soft and just a trifle misty, but inside the hospitable home all was sunshine and merriment, music and song. The happy hours were too swift in their flight and it was with reluctance that guest after guest bade the happy old couple good night.

The children present were: Mary J. Gisi, Marcellite E. Rudloff, Emily J. Harter, Mary Ann Thomure, Roaly E. Gisi, Lucinda J. Shearlock, James L. Rigdon, Joseph E. Rigdon, Peter A. Rigdon, Felix J. Rigdon, Francis A. Rigdon and Benjamin M. Rigdon. Lawrence Rigdon was the only one absent. Rev. Father Schaafer the pastor was the only outside invited guest and graced the occasion with his presence.

 

A telegram received here last Sunday brought the sad news of the death of Mr. Edward Vieh, who died in San Antonia, Texas, on Saturday, March 23rd. Mr. Vieh was a sufferer from consumption and went to Texas in the hope of regaining his health and for a time improved rapidly.  Only a week previous to his death in a letter to his parents, he stated that his health had so much improved that he intended to embark in business in San Antonia, but a relapse set in and Mr. Vieh died on the day above mentioned. He was only thirty years of age and leaves a wife and one child, a son, to mourn his untimely death. The remains were brought to St. louis and interred in the cemetery in that city on Thursday, March 28th. The deceased was the second son of Mr. and Mrs. M. Vieh of this city.

 

Fair Play, April 6, 1895

Born, on Friday, March 29, 1895, to the wife of Mr. William Basler of Ste. Genevieve, a daughter.

 

Mr. Peter Heibel has sold his property at Weingarten to Mr. Henry Braun of St. Louis for the sum of $3,300.

 

Joseph and Leon Vorst left on the Belle Memphis Wednesday for Fulton to convey Adolph Stauss to the insane asylum at that place.

 

Marriage licenses were issued this week to John McNeal and Sarah Mooton, and to Charles F. Pfeifer and Ida E. Eaders, all of Beauvais  township.

 

Died, in this city on Monday, April 1, 1895, Mr. Louis White (colored) at the age of 65 years. The remains were interred in the Valle Spring Catholic cemetery on Wednesday.

 

Miss Nora Gettinger has departed for Salisbury, Mo., to nurse her brother Joseph who lost his arm in an accident some time ago. Mr. Getting is steadily improving.

 

Obituary.

Mr. George W. Barnes, the subject of this notice, died at his home in Bonne Terre, Mo., on the evening of March 24, 1895, of pneumonia. George was the eldest son of the late A. L. Barnes, one of Ste. Genevieve county’s early settlers, and was born in that county on April 12th, 1854m according to best data that could be obtained by the writer. The survivors of his own immediate family consist of a wife and one own and one step-child, left to experience the hardships incident to a widowed and orphan life; together with a host of friends and relatives to mourn his death, On the second day following his demise his remains were brought to Ste. Genevieve county, and were interred in the Laws cemetery, a neighborhood burying ground that marks the last resting place of a goodly number of his relatives as well as two children of his own. For the last six and a half years George Barnes has been in the employ of the St. Joe Lead Company and to say the least of him, he was, as a provider for his family, above par with the average man. No man had a kinder heart and no man worked harder to support his family. (editorial with a poem not transcribed).

 

Womack News.

Mrs. George Womack’s mother was buried last Saturday. She was a Christian lady and loved by all who knew her.

 

Fair Play, April 13, 1895

John Hartshorn an old and respective citizen of Farmington died at his home in that city last week. Mr. Hartshorn was at one time editor of the Farmington Herald.

 

Born, on Sunday, April 7, 1895, to the wife of Joseph Oil (colored) a daughter.

 

Born, on Friday, April 12, 1895, to the wife of Mr. Henry Okenfuss of this city, a daughter.

 

The infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Zyriac Wipfler died last Thursday and was buried on Friday, 5th inst.

 

Minnith News.

Mr. Seth Hall of Pujol it is understood, will return to Minnith and take charge of the black-smith shop.

Mr. Fritz Pfeiffer and Miss Ida Eades were married last Wednesday.

 

Fair Play, April 20, 1895

Died, on Monday, 15th inst., Harry, 19 months’ old son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Siebert. The remains were interred in the Catholic Cemetery at St. Mary’s on Tuesday.

 

Mr. George Messinger, who lives near Quarrytown, was kicked by a mule last Friday evening and seriously hurt. His jaw-bone was fractured and several of his teeth were knocked out.

 

The infant child of Mr. and Mrs Joseph Burgert died this week.

 

David, son of Judge James D. Fox of Fredericktown, died in that city on Monday, 15th inst., of consumption at the age of twenty-one years.

 

Marriage licenses were issued this week to Perrin A. Goss and Elizabeth Harter; Amos Carron and Katie Dentler; William J. Boyer and Selina Boyer.

 

 

Thomas D. Godfrey of Grafton, Ill., and Marie A. Deck, Ste. Genevieve, Mo., were married by Judge Simpson, in the Parlor of the Hotel Cliff in this City at 3 p. m. on last Monday. Mr. Henry Virgilio and Miss Louisa F. Effrein, both of Ste. Genevieve, Mo., were the groomsmen and bridesmaid attending them. Miss Deck is one of Ste. Genevieve’s belles, and Mr. Godfrey is one of the officers of the Government on the river fleet and has been with them for a number of years. He belongs to one of the oldest and most respected families of Grafton, Ills. The party remained over night and took a drive over the city and visited the prison next morning, prior to starting for their homes.--Chester Tribune.

 

Mr. James A. Rigdon, one of our county’s best citizens, died very suddenly at his home at River aux Vases on Tuesday morning, April 16, 1895. When Mr. Rigdon retired Monday night he was apparently in good health but he awoke a few minutes before one and complained of a severe pain in his side, and died shortly afterwards from heart disease. Mr. Rigdon was seventy-nine years old and was the father of fifteen children, thirteen of whom are living. On March 10th last Mr. and Mrs. Rigdon celebrated their Diamond Wedding, mention of which was made in the Fair Play at the time. His wife still survives him. The funeral took place from the River aux Vases Catholic Church on Wednesday, Rev. Father A. H. Schaefer officiating.

 

Fair Play, April 27, 1895

A son was born to Mr. and Mrs. Peter Wolk on March 16, 1895.

 

Born, on Monday, April 22, 1895, to the wife of Mr. C. T. Bono of Ste. Genevieve, a daughter.

 

Miss Ella Pratte of St. Louis and Mr. Smith Boyce of this city were married in St. Louis on Saturday last, April 20, 1895.

 

Mrs. Amalie Bernays died at her residence in this city on Tuesday, April 23, 1895,  at 12 o’clock of pneumonia, at the age of 69 years and eight months. the funeral took place on Thursday morning at nine o’clock from the Catholic Church, Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout officiating. The remains were interred in the Valle Spring Catholic Cemetery. Mrs. Bernays was born in Baden, Baden, Germany. Her husband, Dr. F. J. Bernays, preceded her to the grave just fifteen months, having died in January, 1894. The deceased leaves three daughters, Mrs. Dr. M. Andre and Miss Annie Bernays of this city, and Mrs. Charles Fischer of St. Louis, besides a large number of friends to mourn her loss.

 

Camille J. Stanton was examined in open court last Monday before Judge James D. Fox and admitted to practice law in this State. The examination lasted two hours, all the attorneys present taking part. In conferring the license Judge Fox said the applicant had passed a very creditable examination and the attorneys were all of the same opinion. Camille has been in attendance at the St. Louis Law School for the past two winters; he is a bright young man and has many friends who wish him unbounded success in his new vocation.  It is his intention to settle down to business at his home in Ste. Genevieve.

 

Married, at the Catholic Church in this city on Tuesday, April 23, 1895, Rev. C. L. van Tourenhout officiating, Miss Mary E. Arney and Mr. Emmett J. Heberlie of Beauvais

township, this county.

 

Bloomsdale News.

Died, Wednesday, 17th inst., Miss Louisa Jokerst, at the age of 19 years and 4 months. May her soul rest in peace.

Mr. William Kenner of Festus and Mrs. Lizzie Andrews of Nashville, Tennessee, passed through Ste. Genevieve on Saturday, April 20th, on their way to Minnith to celebrate the 66th birthday of Mr. Housand Kenner. On their return they stopped with their niece Mrs. Paul L. Lempke. Mrs. Andrews departed for her home in Tennessee on the City of Savannah Wednesday morning.

 

Fair Play, May 4, 1895

The five-year-old son of Frank James (colored) died on Monday of this week.

 

Mr. John C. Munro and Miss Alice Rutledge were married on Monday, April 29, 1895, by ‘Squire Cox at the residence of Mr. Paul L. Lempke.

 

Mr. Perrin A. Goss died of erysipelas at the residence of his mother near Ste. Genevieve on Sunday morning, April 28th, 1895, at 3:30 A. M., at the age of 29 years, eight months and nine days. Mr. Goss was sick only two weeks and was to have been married two days before his death to Miss Lizzie, daughter of Mr. John Harter, of Coffman. The remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery at Valle Spring on Monday morning after a mass had been said for the repose of the soul by Rev. Father van Tourenhout. The bereaved relatives and friends have the sympathy of the community in their sad loss.

 

Married, at the Catholic Church in this city, on Tuesday, April 30, 1895, by Rev. C. L. van Tourenhout, Miss Sophie Haug of Ste. Genevieve and Mr. John Ebert of St. Louis.

 

Obituary.

From the Fredericktown Democrat.

In the bloom of young manhood with a promising future before him, esteemed by all, David Fox, son of Judge Fox, on the 16th day of April, 1895, at the age of twenty-one years and six months, past the portals of earthly life, and his spirit entered the realms of the future existence beyond the tomb.

He had been for some time the official stenographer of the circuit court, a position he filled with marked ability and to the entire satisfaction of the bar. By reason of his courteous demeanor and kindly disposition, every body was his friend, and all deeply deplore his untimely death. The dark cloud with its withering pall hung over him; insatiable disease encroached upon his young life, and at last the chilly hand of death rested upon his brow, and his eyes peacefully closed upon all things earthly, yet he lives, bidding his parents and sister to meet him in the spirit land of his eternal abode. (lengthy editorial about his death was not transcribed).

 

Fair Play, May 11, 1895

Born, to Mrs. Benj. Effrein, Jr., of this city, on Friday, May 3rd, 1895, a son.

 

A marriage license was issued this week to Mr. John N. Kertz and Miss Amelia Carron.

 

Born, on Thursday, May 2nd, 1895, to the wife of Mr. Louis Lux, Jr., of Ste. Genevieve, a son.

 

The wife of Mr. Henry T. Burnes, formerly county clerk of Perry county, died at her residence in St. Louis last Saturday, 4th inst.

 

Married, at the Catholic Church in this city on Tuesday, May 7, 1895, by Rev. Father C. L. can Tourenhout, Miss Josephine Gisi and Mr. Joseph H. Rehm, both of Ste. Genevieve. Misses Christine Siebert and Emily Gisi assisted the bride and Messrs. Louis Gisi and Charles Rehm were the groomsmen. A wedding dinner was served at the bride’s residence and the young couple were tendered a serenade by the Force Band at night.

 

Mr. Charles Rottler departed for Germany Wednesday and on his return will be accompanied by his father and mother who will make Ste. Genevieve their future home. Mr. Rottler will be absent about six weeks.

 

Bloomsdale News.

 

We are sorry to say Mr. Mathias Kertz departed on Wednesday, May 1st, for the S. J. Novitiate at Florisant, Mo. Mr. Kertz intends to spend his life there. Bloomsdale cannot afford to spare many such young men as Mr. Kertz.

 

Married, on Monday, April 29th, 1895, Mr. William J. Boyer to Miss Selena Boyer, and on Tuesday following, Mr. Amos Carron to Miss Katie Dentler. Both couple have the best wishes of your correspondent.

 

Born, on Wednesday, May 1st, 1895, to the wife of ‘Squire Boyer a daughter.

 

Fair Play, May 18, 1895

State Senator Peter Morrissey was killed by a woman in a disorderly house in St. Louis early Monday morning.

 

Born, on Thursday, May 9, 1895, to the wife of Mr. John Mitchell, a son.

 

Died, on Wednesday, May 15, 1895, the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Louis Lux, Jr., of Ste. Genevieve.

 

A marriage license was granted this week to William Uhrich and Miss Josephine Palmer of Union Township.

 

Died, in St. Louis on Friday, May 10, 1895, Mrs. Catherine Scott, mother of Mrs. John Burch and Mr. Joseph Donovan of this city.

 

Will Pinkerton, the Chester tombstone man erected a tombstone over the grave of Mr. Frank Pratte in the Valle Spring cemetery this week.

 

Married, at the Catholic Church in this city on Tuesday, May 14, 1895, by Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout, Miss Walburger Wipfler of Ste. Genevieve and Mr. Charles Becker of Los Angeles, California.

 

Mrs. Anthony Brown died at her home at Zell on Tuesday, May 14, 1895, at the advanced age of ninety-two years. The remains were interred in the Catholic Cemetery at that place on Wednesday, Rev. Father Pigge officiating.

 

Fair Play, May 25, 1895

Coley Hill, constable of Arcadia Township, shot and killed Hon. J. B. Walker, Prosecuting Attorney of Iron County, at Pilot Knob Friday Walker died in two minutes after the shooting. The quarrel was over an old grudge. Hill has been arrested.

 

The embalmed whale arrived here on time last Sunday morning and was viewed by an immense number of our citizens on the following four days.

 

Mrs. Bridget Roth died at her home in this city Friday morning, May 24, 1895, at three o’clock. The funeral will take place Sunday afternoon at two o’clock.

 

Married, at the Catholic Church in this city on Wednesday, May 22, 1895, by Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout, Miss Mary Gittinger of Ste. Genevieve and Mr. Lawrence Esert of Salisbury, Mo. The wedded couple departed for Salisbury Wednesday evening to reside in the future.

 

Obituary.

Died, at her home in Weingarten on May 18, 1895, Magdalena Brischle, nee Kurfurat, consort of Mr. Vincent Brischle. Magdalena Brischle was born at Weier, near Offenburg, Baden, on June 9th, 1809, and was united in matrimony to Mr. Vincent Brischle on November 25, 1836. On November 25, 1856, they left their home in Baden  accompanied by five living children, reaching Ste. Genevieve landing via New Orleans on February 9, 1857, after a continual voyage of 76 days. Of their five children Veronica, relict of John Sins of Iron Mountain is dead, while Ignatz lives on the old homestead and Joseph is the senior partner of Brischle & Karl. Two daughters, Mrs. Victoria Gegg and Mrs. August Schwent mourn with their aged father the loss of a kind and loving mother. Although 86 years old, Mrs. Brischle was in happy possession of all her mental faculties, her memory being especially good and she prepared herself for death by the repeated reception of the holy sacraments. A great concourse of people followed her remains to her last resting place at Weingarten cemetery on Sunday afternon and on Monday Father Huttler celebrated a funeral High Mass for the repose of her soul. May she rest in peace.

 

Fair Play, June 1, 1895

Maurice Anthony, the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Louis Baumann, died on Wednesday, May 29, 1895, and was buried at the Catholic cemetery on Thursday afternoon at three o’clock.

 

McCarver Acquitted.

Farmington, Mo., May 29.--The celebrated McCarver murder case was called for trial Friday morning, and Saturday the case was submitted to the jury, which, after being out 45 minutes, returned a verdict of “not guilty.”  A peculiar interest is attached to this case from the fact that the defendant was convicted and sentenced to the penitentiary for 25 year.  After serving five years of the sentence, the Supreme Court reversed the decision and sent the case back for retrial. Senators Jaspar N. Burks and M. R. Smith ably and gratuitously defended McCarver. Prosecuting Attorney Abernathy represented the State.

 

On the morning of October 7, 1887, the dead body of George Stone was found by the side of the St. Mary’s and Mine La Motte road, two and one-half miles from the town. The testimony showed that the defendant met Stone at Mine La Motte on the afternoon of October 6  Stone was drunk here and had a difficulty with a man named Haywood.  It was proposed to send Stone home, band he was placed on his horse, but was unable to ride. McCarver and Abram J. Gordon were riding in a buggy. It was suggested that Stone be placed in McCarver’s buggy and that Gordon ride Stone’s horse.  In this manner they left Mine La Motte. they were met by a number of persons on the road.

 

Stone lived in the neighborhood of Libertyville and McCarver lived on the St. Mary and Mine La Motte road. The proper place for Stone to have been put out of the buggy was at the junction of the St. Mary’s and Libertyville road, near Rock Creek. Instead of McCarver’s putting Stone out there, he drove on a mile and a quarter further and dropped Stone on a brush pile by the roadside. Here the dead body of Stone was found the next morning by Wm. M. Johnson.

 

The day after the post-mortem examination, John B. McCarver and Abram J. Gordon were arrested. An indictment was found against each at the fall term of Circuit Court. Gordon turned State’s evidence and was released.  He testified to helping McCarver put Stone out of the buggy, but stated that he did not know at the time that Stone was dead. Gordon got in the buggy with McCarver and they drove home. After leaving Stone’s body, Gordon said that McCarver told him that if he ever told anybody that he killed Stone he (McCarver) would kill him.

 

McCarver testified that he did know that Stone was dead, but put him out, supposing him to be beastly drunk. This was after dark on October 6.

 

The State could not prove that McCarver had any motive to commit the murder. Stone and McCarver were strangers until they met as the circus at Mine La Motte on the day of Stone’s death.--Republic.

 

Bloomsdale News.

 

Ferd Charleville and Louis Ratty of Bloomsdale were in Ste. Genevieve to see the embalmed whale. Both gentlemen say it’s the biggest carcas they ever saw and stood right in its mouth.

 

Married, at the Catholic Church, on Tuesday, 21 inst., Mr. John N. Kertz and Miss Mamie E. Carron, daughter of Judge Carron. The groomsmen were Michael Kertz, Andrew Carron and the bridesmaids were Miss Julia and Louisa Carron. A fine dinner was served at the residence of the bride’s father for the two families and the nearest relatives.  The newly married couple have the best wishes of your correspondent.

 

Fair Play, June 8, 1895

An eleven pound son was born to Mrs. Paul L. Lempke on Sunday, June 2, 1895.

 

Born, on Friday, May 31, 1895, to the wife of Mr. W. C. Bullis of this city, a daughter.

 

Born, on Friday, May 31 1895, to the wife of Mr. Firmin J. Rozier of this city, a fourteen pound son.

 

Born, on Wednesday, June 5, 1895, to the wife of Mr. Peter Geiler of Ste. Genevieve, a son.

 

Poisoned By Sardines.

Poplar Bluff, Mo., June 3.---At the residence of Frank A Garetson, President of the Garetson-Greason Lumber Co., Mr. Garetson, his wife, son Ray, 8 years old, Abbie Ackerman the girl, and Rev. Burks who was a guest of the family, were poisoned by sardines. Investigation showed that on last Friday, the boy Ray wanted to open the can, and had punctured the lid with a knife, when the girl took it away from him and set it away until last evening. Mrs. Garetson was compelled to leave church but the others escaped until after the services was over when they were stricken down. Several doctors were summoned and worked with them all night and constant and vigilance hope to save all their lives, but they are all prostrated and in a critical condition. Mr. Garetson was so badly poisoned that he vomited blood. Post-Dispatch.

 

Fair Play, June 15, 1895

Died, at her home at Lawrenceton on Friday, June 7, 1895, of paralysis, Mrs. Virginia McClenahan, aged about ninety years.

 

The trial of Milton and Bazil Sweet and Noah Lavorar, charged with murdering, robbing and burning the body of Price Ditch, at Festus, on the night of November 25, 1894, is now in progress at Hillsboro.

 

Rev. Father Martin Bahr, who was ordained in St. Louis last Saturday, will celebrate his first mass in the Catholic Church in this city at ten o’clock tomorrow morning. Visiting clergymen from the several parishes of the county will be present.

 

Born, on Tuesday, June 11, 1895, to the wife of Mr. Charles Siebert of New Bremen, a daughter.

 

A marriage license was issued this week to Anton Schwartz and Mary Steevens, both of Saline township.

 

Died, on Tuesday, June 11, 1895, the infant child of Mr. and Mrs. William Reich of this city. The remains were interred in the Valley Spring Catholic cemetery on Thursday.

 

Fair Play, June 22, 1895

Rev. Father Bahr celebrated his first mass at the Catholic Church in this city last Sunday. Visiting clergymen from every parish in the county were present. Father van Tourenhout delivered an English sermon and Father Huttler of Weingarten spoke in German.

 

Born, on Sunday, June 16, 1895, to the wife of Mr. John Grieshaber of this city, a son.

 

Mr. Charles Rottler writes from Germany that he will return home with his father and mother next Thursday night, 27th inst.

 

Antoine Labruyere killed a black snake in a clover field near his house which measured seven feet in length. The snake was found by two little shepherd dogs which first attacked it. It is supposed that the snake swallowed eight little turkeys that were missed at the same time. Mr. Labruyere claims that it is the largest snake he ever killed. He killed 37 last year and 10 already this year.

 

While at work at the Government quarries at Little Rock Mr. Tanis Larose was struck by a falling rock last Thursday morning and died from his injuries at eleven o’clock that night. Mr. La Rose was at work below the bluff when the rock, which weighed over two hundred pounds, fell and struck him, breaking his back-bone and several ribs and smashing his leg into a pulp. Dr. R. L. Moore, the government physician, was called and had the injured man removed to his home in this city. Together with Dr. Carssow an examination was made and it was found that Mr. LaRose could only live a few hours at the most. Mr. Crane, the superintendent, tells us that no blasting had been done where the rock fell for over a year and thinks that the rock was loosened by the rains during the past week. Two other workmen were close by and narrowly escaped with their lives. Mr. Larose was a hard working man, forty-three years old and had been married twelve years; he leaves a wife and six children who were dependent upon him for their support. The remains were interred in the Valle Spring Catho- cemetery yesterday afternoon.

 

Minnith News.

Nicholas Rond and Miss Jessie Heberlie were married Tuesday. They have the best wishes of the settlement.

 

Bart Adams of Brushy Creek has taken charge of the blacksmith shop at Minnith.

 

The sad news reached Ste. Genevieve last Saturday of the death of Mr. Jacob Pilliard, Justice of the Peace of Jackson township, who was overcome by foul air while rescuing a man who was cleaning out a well on his farm near Bloomsdale. He had employed a couple of men to do the job and was cutting wheat nearby when one of the men called for assistance. Mr. Pilliard ran at once to the well and was let down by means of a bucket. He succeeded in getting the man out, but was himself overcome and when taken out of the well was more dead than alive. He never regained consciousness and died in a few hours. Mr. Pilliard was a young man who was well liked and respected by all his acquaintances. He leaves a wife and family who have the sympathy of the community in their sad loss.

 

The Sweets and Lavarar Acquitted.

The case of the State vs. Milton and Bazile Sweet and Noah Lavarar, charged with the murder of Price Ditch, was tried at Hillsboro last week.

 

Zeke Dix was the first witness, and he succeeded in convincing everybody that he is a very bad boy, if not totally depraved at least very unreliable. To the State’s attorney he detailed the same story he told at the preliminary examination before Esq. Frazier, of meeting with Hampton at Festus on Saturday, sleeping with him in a straw stack, loafing around the depot and drinking whiskey procured at Ditch’s saloon on Sunday, meeting with the Sweets and Lavarar Sunday night and accompanying them to near the saloon, remaining outside with Hampton while the other three went in and did the murder and robbery and firing of the building, and going out into an old field and dividing the money. On cross examination he admitted to Attorney Dearing that he had told him that he was hired by Mr. Abernathy to tell the story he did, on promise of $150 cash, and being  acquitted on the charge against him here and also of the charge of forgery in St. Francois county. On being asked by Mr. Dearing if he was not at Clardy’s sawmill in St. Francois county on the night of the murder, and being abjured in the name of God that now’s the time to answer truthfully, he finally answered yes.  On redirect examination he stated that his first story was true and the tale he had told Mr. Dearing was false.

 

Engineer Millard, of the M. R. & B. T. road, told of seeing two men standing near the saloon that night as he passed north with his train, and of finding the saloon burning when he returned. He also detailed efforts of the train men to put out the fire, and of his own discovery of the remains of a human body in the burned building.  The only important part of his testimony was the seeing of the two men as he passed north, the theory of the State being that they were Hampton and Dix.

 

John F. Williamson and John Meyer, father-in-law of Ditch, detailed suspicious actions on the part of Milton Sweet , who claimed to have seen three tramps around the saloon on Sunday and volunteered to go in search of them, in borrowing a hat from Meyers, saying that the cap he wore would “give him away,” and in borrowing a pistol, saying that if he had kept the one he found a few days before near Crystal, he would not have to borrow, but that he had sent it to his brother on the Okaw river. They also told of Milton  having coal oil on his gloves and clothes, which is to support the theory that the body was saturated with oil to make it burn better. Mr. Millard had testified that the body was still burning when he discovered it, but he thought it was an alcohol fire.

 

The State introduced several other witnesses, but elicited nothing more coroborative of Dix’s narrative.

 

Several witnesses, residents of St. Francois county, were introduced by the defense to prove that on the 25th of November last, the time of the murder, Dix was near Clardy’s sawmill, in that county, and members of the families of defendants were introduced to prove an alibi.  This testimony was the same as given in the preliminary examination. Sheriff Ogle and a Mr. Miller of Farmington testified as to the statements made by Dix to Mr. Dearing, about his having been bribed to swear falsely, and that the statements were made voluntarily.  A number of St. Francois county people were called who did not think Zeke Dix was at or near Clardy’s sawmill on the 24th, 23rd, or 25th of November, 1894, and some who gave bad reputations to some of the witnesses for the defense; and the evidence was closed at half past five Tuesday.

 

The case was given to the jury a few minutes before 4 o’clock, and in a very short time they returned a verdict of “not guilty.”--Democrat.

 

Fair Play, June 20, 1895

If Carl Browne and Mamie Coxey try to get married on the Capitol steps they will be arrested for disorderly conduct.

 

Mr. Charles Rottler returned home from Germany last Wednesday night on the City of Monroe, accompanied by his father and mother who will make Ste. Genevieve their future home. On their arrival they were welcomed by a large number of relatives and friends and were serenaded by the Union State Band.

 

Mrs. Mary Ursula Leyatte died at her home in Ste. Genevieve of dropsy on Monday, June 24, 1895, after an illness of six weeks, at the age of sixty-five years. The remains were interred in the Valle Spring Catholic cemetery on Tuesday morning. The deceased leaves a husband and four children, three girls and one boy, to mourn her loss.

 

Mr. Irving J. Buck, assistant property man at the Government Works at this place, was married in St. Louis Thursday to Miss Phebe Michael of Buffalo, N. Y.

 

Mr. Charles A. Rozier, eldest son of Mayor C. C. Rozier was married last Thursday, 20th inst., to Miss Annie Bardill of Grantfork, Ill., and arrived here Friday night to spend several days with relatives.  They departed for Dallas, Texas, Wednesday and will make that place their home. M. Rozier and his b ride have our best wishes for a happy wedded life.

 

Miss Flora Detchmendy was married at her mother’s home in this city last Wednesday morning, June 26, 1895, to Mr. M. H. Knowlton of Osage, Iowa, Rev. Father Weiss officiating. The couple left on the New Idlewild for St. Louis Wednesday evening and from there will go to St. Paul on a bridal tour and then to Osage to reside in the future. The Fair Play extends congratulations.

 

A PICTURE OF MENARD an Old Portrait Presented to the State of Texas.

Some time ago Mrs. Mary LeClere found stored away in a garett a portrait of Michael B. Menard, the founder of Galveston, and a man famous in the early days of the Republic of Texas. This she turned over to Mr. Kimball to retouch, as there were many blotches on the canvas made by the ravages of time.

 

Thinking that the portrait of such a hero ought to hang in the capitol of the state he loved so well, she wrote to Governor Culberson, offering him, as the legal representative of Texas, the likeness, to which the governor replied in these words:

 

Executive Office State of Texas, Austin, June 17, 1895.--Mrs. Mary LeClere, 1505 Twenty-ninth street, Galveston, Texas.--Dear Madam: Your esteemed favor of June 15 is received. On behalf of the people of this state I desire to gratefully accept and most cordially thank you for the proffer of the portrait of Michael B. Menard, the founder of Galveston and one of the early patriots of the republic of Texas.

 

This and future generations should feel profoundly grateful to those old heroes and statemen who brought to us our noble heritage and it is a matter of common congratulation that we are enabled to secure this portrait. Please send the picture to me here and I assure you that it shall receive a fitting repository in the capitol. Very respectfully, C. A. Culberson, Governor.

 

In one corner of the portrait is inscribed a few of the honors that the subject enjoyed, “Michael B. Menard,” it reads, “a signer of the declaration of independence and one of the framers of the constitution of the republic of Texas; founder of the city of Galveston.”

 

The artist is unknown. The picture was made probably 40 years ago.”--Galveston Tribune.

 

Fair Play, July 6, 1895

The infant child of Mr. Frank Beauchamp, Jr, died on Wednesday night, July 3, 1895. The remains were interred in the Valle Spring Catholic cemetery Friday.

 

Married, in this city on Wednesday, July 3, 1895, by ‘Squire Roman Huck, Miss Marie Jenny of Ste. Genevieve and Mr. Jacob Hehr of Bloomsdale.

 

Odile, the seven year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Garrin of St. Louis, died in that city of diphtheria, on Monday, July 1, 1895.

 

A telegram was received by Mrs. Felicite Flamm Friday conveying the sad news of the death of her grand-son, Albert Flamm, who was drowned in St. Louis on the 4th. The telegram gave no particulars.

 

On his way to his home with a load of lumber last Monday afternoon about four o’clock, Mr. Simon Burgert, who lives about five miles from Ste. Genevieve, was thrown from his wagon and very seriously injured. The wagon, which contained 400 feet of lumber, passed over his head breaking his jaw-bone and otherwise injuring him. Mr. Burgert was carried to Mr. Burle’s house near where the accident occurred and medical aid called, and at this writing is doing as well as could be expected and hopes are entertained for his recovery. Mr. Burgert is about 70 years of age.

 

A daughter was born to Mr. and Mrs. George Wehner on Friday, June 28th.

 

Born, on Sunday, June 30, 1895, to the wife of Mr. George LaRose of this city, a son.

 

Fair Play, July 13, 1895

Mr. Augustus C. Hertich died at the residence of his mother in this city on Wednesday morning, July 10, 1895, at 6:30 o’clock after an illness of two weeks, at the age of thirty-eight years.  Before his death the deceased received the last sacraments of the Catholic Church and the remains were interred in the Valle Spring Catholic cemetery on Thursday afternoon at four o’clock, Rev. Father Weiss performing the last rites. The funeral was attended by al large number of sorrowing friends and relatives. R. I. P.

 

Hulbert, the six months’ old son of Mr. and Mrs. Columbus  Abernathy died yesterday morning at ten o’clock.

 

A man by the name of John Bevering from St. Louis, aged  40 years, died suddenly on one of the quarter boats at the Government Works at this place Tuesday night. The remains were sent to St. Louis Wednesday night for burial. Apoplexy was the cause of his death.

 

The Government Quarries at Little Rock landing, two miles north of this city, was the scene of another fatal accident last Monday afternoon at three o’clock in which Leon Crump lost his life.  Frank Deloney was seriously, if not fatally, injured, and  George Grieshaber painfully injured. The men were at work on the bluff when the dirt caved, throwing Messrs. Crump and Daloney on the rocks below, a distance of over fifty feet. Mr. Crump was killed instantly and all that saved Mr. Deloney from instant death was the fact that he fell on top of the body of Mr. Crump and not on the rocks. Mr. Grieshaber was buried by the falling dirt and had to be extricated by his fellow workmen. He was only slightly injured and will be able to get around in a few days. Medical attendance was called and Mr. Deloney was brought to his home in this city where he now lies in a precarious condition. Dr. G. M. Rutledge, the coroner, summoned a jury composed of R. W. Lanning, H. L. Siebert, Louis Delcommune, C. J. Wilder, Noah Thomure and Ed. Beeve, and held an inquest on the dead body of Mr. Crump at the scene of the accident. After hearing the testimony the jury brought in a verdict of accidental death. The deceased leaves a wife and five children who are in poor circumstances. The remains were interred in the Valle Spring Catholic cemetery on Tuesday afternoon at two o’clock.

 

Tony Scherer and Jos. Kohm were also slightly bruised by the caving dirt and rocks. This is the second fatal accident that has occurred at these quarries in less than a month and a number of laborers quit work last Tuesday. It is said that the recent heavy rains have loosened the dirt considerably and after blasting the dirt and rock are more liable to give way than during dry weather.

 

Severin Kiefer of River aux Vases, was tried in ‘Squire Cox’s Court last Saturday afternoon charged with assaulting William Joggerst and acquitted of the charge.

 

Fair Play, July 20, 1895--no vital records recorded.

Fair Play, July 27, 1895

A son was born to the wife of Mr. Peter Roth of this city one day this week.

 

A marriage license was issued this week to William Naeger and Sophia Kreitler.

 

A party of young men composed of Anton Reich, Henry Virgilio, Adolph Okenfuss, Fred Operle, Will Naumann, Robert Burns, Ed Baumann and Tom Lalumondiere went to Weingarten on their bicycles last Sunday. On the return trip Henry Virgilio had the misfortune to break his wheel and had to foot it home.

 

The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. John J. Vaeth, who lives about four miles from Ste. Genevieve, died on Monday, 22nd inst. The remains were interred in the Valle Spring Catholic cemetery on Tuesday.

 

The sad news reached Ste. Genevieve by telegraph Wednesday of the death of Mrs. Charles Baum which occurred on that day. Mrs. Baum gave birth to a son early Sunday morning and a letter received by  her parents in this city stated that mother and child were doing well, so we may judge of the shock to them when the message came announcing her death. Alice, who was the only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Eli P. Boyer of this city, was born in Ste. Genevieve on October 11, 1870, and was, therefore, not quite twenty-five years of age. She was married on October 10th of last year to Mr. Charles Baum and left immediately for Pueble to reside. The deceased was a great favorite among her acquaintances here, who will all learn with regret of her sad and untimely end. The remains were brought to Ste. Genevieve last night and will be interred in the Valle Spring Catholic cemetery today. The bereaved parents and sorrowing husband have the sympathy of the entire community in their sad misfortune.

 

Fair Play, August 3, 1895

The trial of Arthur Duestrow, charged with killing his wife and two year old child in St. Louis on February 13, 1894, is no w in progress at Union, Mo. The trial will last probably two weeks.

 

Died, at the residence of her father near Weingarten, on Sunday, July 28, 1895, Miss Catharine Kraenzle, aged 26 years. The deceased was a daughter of Mr. Anton Kraenzle. The remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery at Weingarten on Monday.

 

Last week we made a brief mention of the accident to Judge C. P. Clark, of Libertyville, expressing the hope that it might not be serious as then believed. Unhappily that hope was destroyed by a completer knowledge. The unfortunate man while driving a team of unruly horses was run away with and in the final crash had his skull fractured, besides suffering severe internal injury. The best medical aid proved fruitless, and death ensured the succeeding Saturday.  He passed away quietly and resigned to his fate. Judge Clark was born in Perry County, Sept. 15, 1838, removing with his parents to St. Francois county in  1847, where he resided ever since. He leaves a mother aged 86 years and four brothers to mourn his departure. Two of these latter are residents of Texas, one is a citizen of St. Francois, and the fourth is Jas. H. Clark, Register of the Land Office in Ironton. Judge Clark was an estimable citizen, having  more than once been honored with public preferment, and his death is a great loss to the community of which he was a member.--Ironton Register.

 

Fair Play, August 10, 1895

The infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Conrad Meyer of this city died on Sunday last, August 4th. The remains were interred in the  Valley Spring Catholic cemetery on Monday.

 

Last Sunday before ‘Squire Edmond Bowling of Saline township were tried for disturbing the peace Jerry Zoleman, Joseph Hammers and Enos Hammers. The jury not finding the evidence sufficient discharged the defendants. Frederick Bryant (colored) was also charged at the same time with carrying concealed weapons but it appearing to the Prosecuting Attorney that the evidence was insufficient he was sent home to his wife without trial and was advised to be better in the future.

 

Died, on Tuesday, August 6, 1895, at 7:30 o’clock P. M., of consumption, Miss Mary Grieshaber, daughter of Mr. Killian Grieshaber, aged 17 years and nine months. Miss Grieshaber had been ill with consumption since the death of her mother, which occurred about one year ago. The remains were interred in the Valle Spring Catholic cemetery on Thursday morning after a mass had been said for the repose of the soul by Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout.

 

The five year old son of Mr. and Mrs. George Mayse (colored) died of blood poisoning and lockjaw last Tuesday after a week of terrible suffering. The child ran a nail in his foot on Tuesday previous to his death and at first very little was thought of the matter, but blood-poisoning set in a few days which resulted in his death. The remains were interred in the Valley Spring Catholic cemetery on Wednesday.

 

A telegram was received here Wednesday from Eureka Springs, Arkansas, announcing the death of Mrs. Mary Britton, daughter of Mrs. Mary LeClere of Galveston, Texas. The deceased is a niece of Mrs. John L. Bogy and Mr. L. B. Valle of this city.

 

Fair Play, August 17, 1895

A thief entered the house of Mr. G. Rehm last Tuesday night about eight o’clock and stole thirty dollars from the bureau drawer. The folks were away from the house at the time.

 

A child of David Bardeau (colored) died in East St. Louis last week and the remains were brought here for interment Sunday.

 

Died, on Saturday, August 10. 1895, Mrs. Felix Amoureaux, Jr., aged forty-five years. The remains were interred in the Valle Spring Catholic cemetery Sunday afternoon.

 

Mrs. Catharine Vogt died at the residence of her son, Er. Emile P. Vogt, in this city, last Saturday morning, August 10, 1895, at nine o’clock after an illness of two weeks at the advanced age of seventy-five years. During her life Mrs. Vogt was a fervent Catholic and received the last sacraments of the church before her death. The remains were interred in the Valle Spring Catholic cemetery Monday afternoon at five o’clock, Rev. Father Weiss performing the last rites. The deceased was a sister of Mr. Ferd. Moser and Mrs. Peter Thomure of this city and Mrs. L Kempf of St. Louis.

 

Bloomsdale News.

John Pirkey, who skipped into Jefferson county a few days ago was arrested in Ste. Genevieve last Tuesday by Constable Ratty. He was brought here before Justice of the Peace LaRose and after pleading guilty paid his fine and costs amounting to twenty-four dollars.

 

Fair Play, August 24, 1895

Recorder Koehler issued marriage licenses this week to W. M. Ferguson and Sarah A. Thomure, George Basler and Regina Guethle, George Rudloff and Sophie Steimle and to D. F. Deloney and Nellie McWorthy.

 

Born, on Wednesday, August 21, 1895, to the wife of Mr. Bart Eichenlaub of this city, a son.

 

Mr. Frank Deloney and Miss Nellie McWorthy were married in this city last Wednesday evening, August 21, 1895, by Probate Judge Charles C. Rozier. Mr. Deloney will be remembered as the man who was injured by falling off the bluff at the Government works at Little Rock a couple of months ago and whose life was, at the time, despaired of.

 

At Marble Hill last week two weddings took place in the Sheriff’s office that were not quite according to Hoyle, if age is to be taken into consideration. Thos. H. Masters, age 16, was married to Mollie Stripling, aged 15, and John Stripling, age 16, was married to Della Masters, age 14. All the parties are mere striplings.--Ex.

 

Double Wedding.

Bloomsdale, Mo, Aug. 21,’95

A double wedding took place here on Tuesday, August 20, 1895. Ely Thomure was married to Miss Amelia Boyer and Cleophas Boyer to Miss Nora LaRose, Rev. Father Helmbacher officiating.  The bridesmaids were Emma LaRose and Amy Lalumondier, and the groomsmen were Frank Thomure and Leon Drury. After the marriage ceremony the newly married couples repaired to Mr. Octave Boyer’s residence where a most delicious dinner was served. The evening was spent in dancing and everything to make it a pleasant and enjoyable wedding was on hand. Refreshments were not amiss and the best music for dancing was furnished by our several violinists. Ely and Cleophas are both popular young men and have chosen for their companions two of our most charming young ladies. They intend to make their future home at this place where joy, happiness and prosperity to them is the best swish of your correspondent. (A list of wedding presents/gift givers were including in the article but not transposed)

 

Fair Play, August 31, 1895

Jesse James Son.

“There was a curious little page in the history of Jesse James, or rather that of his family,” said Representative Hall of Missouri, ‘which was never written. Gov. Crittenden, now consul-general to Mexico, was as you recollect, the chief executive of Missouri at the time the redoubtable Jesse James was killed. Bob Ford, who shot Jesse, and afterward pleaded guilty to a charge of murder in the first degree, and was sentenced to be hanged by the St. Joe court, was immediately pardoned by Gov. Crittenden.

“This, of course, was by agreement made long before to cover just such a contingency, and excited neither surprise nor comment at the time. Why did Ford plead guilty? Because he wanted a record of once in jeopardy as a bar to any future indictment which might have been preferred after Crittenden had ceased to be governor, and when a chief executive might not have been so prompt with his pardon.

 

“But about the curious page in the James history to which I referred. Jesse James had a son about 13 years old. After Crittenden had ceased to be governor he opened a law office in Kansas City. After organizing for business he needed an office boy, and put an advertisement in one of the local papers. In response a well-dressed, handsome, very intelligent boy put in an appearance. There had been a score of responses, but Gov. Crittenden was very much attracted to this particular boy, he seemed so quick and bright, and frank. After talking with him a bit Gov. Crittenden decided to employ him. The boy said he lived on Seventeenth street, Kansas City, with his mother, who was a widow.

“What is your name?” said Gov.  Crittenden.

“James,”replied the boy.

“At this point somebody came in to distract Crittenden’s atttention, and he simply adopted the boy into his business without further inquiry. The boy turned out to be a very energetic and valuable youth, and the governor was delighted with his choice. He supposed all the time that the name ‘James’ given him by the boy was his first name. At the end of a week Gov. Crittenden had occasion to draw a check for his office boy’s salary.

“What did you say your last name was?” asked Gov. Crittenden as he dipped his pen in the ink bottle.

“James,’ replied the boy.

“’Is that your last name?’ inquired Crittenden.

“’Yes.’

“’Well, what is your first name then?’ asked the executive, somewhat surprised.

“’Jesse’ answered the boy. ‘My name is Jesse James.’

 

“To say that Crittenden was astonished would be a mild way to tell it. He began an inquiry into the office boy’s antecedents, which developed the fact that he was the oldest son of the dead outlaw, and bore his father’s name. No, there was no plot in it. The whole thing was one of those accidents which now and then astonish men. It did seem strange that the office boy whom Crittenden selected, as it were, in the dark, should be the son of that celebrated robber, whose bloody taking off the energy of Crittenden had brought about. No, Crittenden didn’t keep the boy, but he did what was better still. He hunted him up a situation where he got a better chance to expand and received twice as much salary.”--Washington Star.

 

A son was born to Mrs. Anthony Kist of River aux Cases on Saturday, Aug. 24, 1895.

 

Mr. Joshua Burch died suddenly at his home in Kaskaskia Thursday. He was the youngest brother of Mr. John Burch of this city.

 

Died, on Tuesday, August 27, 1895, the infant daughter of Mrs. Fred. Bayer. The remains were interred in the Valle Spring Catholic cemetery on Wednesday afternoon.

 

Married, at the Catholic Church in this city, on Monday, August 26, 1895, by Rev. Father C. L. van tourenhout, Miss Mary Amsler and Mr. Charles Klein.

 

Died, on Friday, August 23, 1895, William, the sixteen year old son of Mr. Henry Roth. The remains were interred in the Valley Spring Catholic cemetery on Saturday.

 

Mr. Wendolin Rottler died at his residence in this city on Thursday afternoon, August 29, 1895, at three o’clock of inflammation of the bowels, at the age of twenty-nine years. His death was a great shock to his friends as he was at work the day before, although he had not been feeling well for several days. Mr. Rottler leaves a wife and five small children to mourn his death. He was the son of Mr. Valentine Rottler and at the time of his death was connected with the Ste. Genevieve Brewing and Lighting Association in the capacity of brewer. The remains will be interred in the Catholic cemetery at Valle Spring at nine o’clock this morning.

 

Mr. John Amsler, who lives five miles from town on the Fredericktown road committed suicide last Sunday afternoon by shooting himself through the head with a rifle. He left home with his  rifle Sunday and his family, becoming alarmed because of his absence, began a search for him. The body was found in a pasture not far from the house early Thursday morning badly decomposed. The coroner was notified and a jury summoned who, after hearing the testimony, brought in a verdict of suicide.

 

Fair Play, September 7, 1895

A son was born to Mrs. Ed. Siebert of this city on Wednesday, September 4, 1895.

 

Born, on Thursday, September 5, 1895, to the wife of Mr. Joseph Kohm of this city, a son.

 

Born, on Friday, August 30, 1895, to the wife of Mr. Edmond Nanney of Ste. Genevieve, a son.

 

Born, on Tuesday, September 3, 1895, to the wife of Mr. August Baumann of Ste. Genevieve, a son.

 

Miss Laura Shaw of this city and Mr. J. H. Kiesler of Perryville were married last Sunday afternoon at one o’clock at the residence of the bride’s father by Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout. The bride was assisted by Miss Eunice Brown and Mr. Henry Weiss was groomsman. After the ceremony the bride and groom left for Perryville where they will make their future home. Those present at the wedding from abroad were: Mr. John Kiesler and wife, Mr. and Mrs. John Hoos, Mr. and Mrs. John Beckman, Miss Eunice Brown, Miss Mary Kiesler, Mr. Adolph Kiesler and Mr. Henry Weiss, all of Perryville.

 

Fair Play, September 14, 1895

Born,  on Saturday, September 7, 1895, to the wife of Mr. William Oberle of this city, a son.

 

Born, on Sunday, September 1, 1895, to the wife of W. D. Pitman of Bonne Terre, a girl.

 

Recorder Kochler issued a marriage license this week to John McDaniels and Ida Herrington of Saline township.

 

William Miller and Eliza Hohimer stood on a cooking range at the Menard county (Ill) fair and were married in the presence of a large assemblage of people. The couple were presented with the range, and if there love ever grows cold, it will be the fault of the flue.

 

Miss Virginia Cahoon was married Thursday, September 12, 1895, to Mr. G. Earl Alt of London, England, at the residence of the bride’s father, Hon. B. B. Cahoon of Fredericktown.

 

Fair Play, September 21, 1895

Mr. Franz Brunner died of asthma at the County Farm on Tuesday, 17th inst. Deceased was a member of the J. Felix St. James Post G. A. R. of this city. The remains were interred in the Valle Spring Catholic cemetery on Wednesday.

 

Mr. Howard Price and Miss Victoria B. Hoyt were united in marriage at Chillicothe, Mo., September 3th, 1895. Mr. and Mrs. Price arrived in Bonne Terre this week and are visiting Paul Price, the groom’s brother. Mr. Price is of an old and favorably known family and has many friends in Southeast Missouri who will join us in wishing the happy couple a long life of connubial blessings.--Bonne Terre Democrat.

 

Henry, the nineteen-year-old son of Mr. Ignatius Klein, died very suddenly at his father’s residence a few miles from town last Monday night, September 16, 1895, of inflammation of the brain. The young man was thrown from a horse about a week previous to his death and although at the time he felt no evil effects from the accident, it was the cause of his death. The remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery at Zell on Wednesday.

 

Alonzo, the one-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Moreau, died in this city of dropsy on Saturday, September 14th. The remains were interred in the Valle Spring Catholic cemetery on   Sunday.

 

The infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Kohm died last Friday, 13th inst., and the remains were interred in the Valle Spring Catholic cemetery on Saturday afternoon.

 

The two-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Gus. Baumann died on Monday of this week.

 

Gone To Rest.

Died July 18th, at 10:30 A. M., at the residence of his mother Mrs. Mary B. Price, widow of Sterling Price, Jr., Robert Beverly Price, aged 29 years 6 months and 20 days.

 

After years of suffering and pain, death has released the spirit of Robert Beverly Price from its tenement of clay, and the mortal has put on immortality. (lengthy editorial not transcribed).--Mansfield Mail.

 

Fair Play, September 28, 1895

D. C. Farrar, one of the leading attorneys of Perry County, died at his home in Perryville on Sunday, September 15th.

 

The jury in the Frank Newsum murder case at Jackson brought in a verdict for murder in the second degree and assessed the punishment at fifteen years in the penitentiary. Newsum was tried for murdering a school-teacher at New Madrid some years ago.

 

Born, on Friday, September 20, 1895, to the wife of Mr. George Crane of this city, a daughter.

 

A son was born to Mr. and Mrs. Frank Grieshaber of this city on Thursday, September 26, 1895.

 

Mrs. Mary V. Reece, formerly a resident of Ste. Genevieve county, died at her home in Bonne Terre of cancer on Monday, September 9th, at the age of forty-one years.

 

The many friends of Mr. John H. Jones of Ulam, Ste. Genevieve county, formerly a citizen of this county, will regret to hear of his death. He died quite suddenly at his home last Sunday, it is thought probably from getting overheated, though he had not been very well for some time. Mr. Jones was a man of upright character, an excellent citizen and highly respected by all who knew him. He was brought here for burial, and was interred at Odd Fellows cemetery according to the rites of that order, of which he as a worthy member. --Farmington Times.

 

 

Mr. J. B. Philipson, one of the oldest living residents of Cape Girardeau, as in our office this forenoon. His father, Mr. Jacob Philipson, was one of the pioneers of Ste. Genevieve and occupied the house in which lived later Mr. and Mrs. Felix  Valle, which he built for himself at a cost of $10,000.---Cape Girardeau Gazette.

 

Fair Play, October 5, 1895

Born, on Saturday, September 28, 1895, to the wife of Mr. James Moore of this city, a daughter.

 

A daughter was born to Mr. and Mrs. George Grieshaber on Thursday, September 26th, 1895.

 

Born, on Thursday, October 3, 1895, to the wife of Etienne Robinson (colored) of this city, twins--both girls.

 

Mr. Henry Courtois went to St. Louis last week for the purpose of having an operation performed on his eyes. His right eye, which was totally blind, was removed, and now the sight of the other eye is rapidly improving.

 

Fair Play, October 12, 1895

Born, on Thursday, October 3rd, 1895, to the wife of Mr. Louis Girard of this city, a son.

 

Born, on Thursday, Ootober 3, 1895, to the wife of Mr. W. D. Reeder of St. Louis, a son.

 

Mr. J. B. Thurman and Miss Lilian Young, both of Ste. Genevieve county, were married last Wednesday, Sept. 25th, at the residence of the bride’s parents, Rev. E. A. Spring, officiating. Quite a number of friends and relatives of the couple were present.--Farmington Times.

 

Henry Virgilio, Adolph Okenfuss and Thomas Lalumondiere went to Farmington on their bicycles last Sunday morning. It rained all day and they were obliged to hire a rig to bring them home. The bicycles came in with the Farmington mail hack Wednesday.

 

Capt. G. W. St. Gem returned from the East last Friday accompanied by his wife and step-daughter, Miss Hazel Bigger. Mr. St. Gem was married to Mrs. Lucy Bigger at Winchester, Va. Monday night they were serenaded by the Force Band.

 

The infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Moore of this city died on Saturday, October 5, 1895. The remains were interred in the Valley Spring Catholic cemetery on Sunday afternoon at four o’clock, Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout officiating.

 

Mr. John Glaser and Miss Mary Jokerst were married at the River aux Vases Catholic Church last Tuesday, October 8, 1895, Rev. Father A. H. Schaefer officiating.

 

Joseph Fitzkam, the popular Market street barber, closed his shop this week and spent Monday and Tuesday viewing the sights in St. Louis. This was Joe’s first trip to the city for twenty years, at which time he attended the celebration of the opening of the St. Louis Bridge.

 

Mrs. Caroline Bayer, daughter of Mr. William Baumann, died at the residence of her father, five miles from Ste. Genevieve, on the Tuesday, October 8, 1895, at the age of 36 years. The remains were interred in the Valle Spring Catholic cemetery on Thursday morning after a High Mass had been sung for the repose of the soul by Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout.

 

Fair Play, October 19, 1895

Mr. Louis Obuchon has been appointed postmaster at Ulam, this county, in place of Mr. J. H. Jones, deceased.

 

At St. Mary’s last Tuesday night, fire destroyed the new two-story frame dwelling of Mr. Jules Rozier, Jr. The building was almost completed, but had not yet been turned over to the owner so the loss falls on the contractor, Mr. F. Bartles. We understand the house was insured in the American Centralia of St. Louis for $1.000. The fire was of incendiary origin.

 

Arthur, the four-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry J. Huck of this city, died of membraneous croup on Tuesday, October 15, 1895. The remains were interred in the Valle Spring Catholic cemetery on Wednesday afternoon.

 

Bloomsdale News.

A daughter was born to Mrs. Henry LaRose on Friday, October 10th.

 

Born, on Monday October 14, 1895, to the wife of Mr. Cyrus Drury, a son,

 

Miss Pauline LaRose and Mr. Ferd. Charleville were married on Tuesday, October 8th. The wedding ball was held in the evening at the residence of I. X. LaRose and a fine dinner was served. Your correspondent offers congratulations. Mr. Charleville says he will decline viewing the embalmed whale, hereafter.

 

On Monday, 14th inst., one of the Mr. Charles Schilly’s boys was accidentally shot through the thigh and wrist while unloading corn at Mr. Meinrod Schilly’s. While one of the boys was taking the gun from the wagon it was accidentally discharged. The boys arm was broken and a terrible gash torn in his thigh. Medical attendance was  summoned and he is getting along as well as could be expected.

 

Fair Play, October 26, 1895

 

A son was born to the wife of Mr. John Koetting of this city on Tuesday, October 15, 1895.

 

Born, on Tuesday, October 22, 1895, to the wife of Mr. Joseph Panchot of Ste. Genevieve, a son.

 

Died, in this city on Tuesday, October 22, 1895, Mr. Jean Baptiste Sautot, aged eighty-one years.

 

George I. Ray, Chester’s prominent merchant, died suddenly at his home in that city on Tuesday last, 22nd inst., of heart failure.

 

Marriage licenses were issued this week to Anton Fallert and Josephine Huck; J. F. Pratte and Irene Bogy, and to Henry Basler and Katie Eisenbeis.

 

We regret to learn of the death of Mrs. Valle Harold, who died at her home in Shelbyville, Ill., on Sunday, October 13, 1895, at the age of thirty-two years and nine days. The funeral services were held at the M. E. Church in Greenville, Ill., on Tuesday, 15th inst.

 

Mr. Frank Pratte and Miss Irene Bogy were married at the Catholic Church at St. Mary’s by Rev. Father Wagner on Tuesday morning, October 22, 1895.  After the marriage the couple left for the Atlanta Exposition on a bridal tour.

 

Mrs. Henry Klatte, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Beckermann of this city, died at her home in St. Louis on Thursday afternoon, October 24th. The remains were brought here for burial last night.

 

The dead body of William Cunningham was found hanging in a picket  fence at Mr. Valentine Geiler’s place near Bloomsdale Sunday morning about one o’clock. There was a dance at Mr. Geiler’s residence Saturday night and among others attending the dance was William Cunningham. About the time above mentioned Mr. Pigg, who accompanied Mr. Cunningham to the ball, missed his hat and supposed that Cunningham was wearing it. Val. Geiler and Eugene Carron went to search for him and found him hanging with his neck between two pickets dead. ‘Squire P. J. Primo was notified and proceeded to hold an inquest over the dead body with Joseph Bader, Lambert Drury, John C. Drury, Lawrence Herzog, F. M. Boyer and Michael Sewald as jurors. After hearing the evidence and carefully examining the body the jury returned a verdict that the man had met his death by falling with his neck between two pickets and being choked to death. His relatives, who were present, took charge of the body.

 

Bloomsdale News.

Leon Schilly, son of Charles Schilly, who was accidentally shot last week and mention of which was made in these columns at the time, died on Monday, 21st inst., from his injuries.

 

Fair Play, November 2, 1895

Mrs. M. A. Walters of Poplar Bluff was accidently shot and kill last week by Frank Albro, a prominent young man of that city while out camping on Black River.

 

A marriage license was issued this week to Mr. August Hermann and Mary T. Ruebsam, both of Weingarten.

 

We learn with regret of the death of our old friend, Mr. Alva Culver, who died at his home near Festus Tuesday last.

 

James Vinyard, aged 35 years and unmarried, committed suicide last Saturday, October 26, by shooting himself in the head at his brother’s home near Kinsey in this county. The deceased had been low spirited for some time and had threatened to take his life on several occasions. ‘Squire Primo had a jury empanelled and held an inquest over the remains. The verdict was suicide.

 

Married, at the Catholic Church in this city on Wednesday morning, October 30, 1895, by Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout, Mr. P. J. Corry of Chickasha, I. T. and Miss Sarah Gately of St. Louis. The bride is a sister of Mrs. Peter Lalumondiere of this They left the same day for their home at Chickasha where they will reside.

 

The trial of David Ditch charged with grand larceny occupied the time of circuit court Wednesday afternoon and all day Thursday. The case was given to the jury about five o’clock Thursday afternoon and after remaining out three quarters of an hour they brought in a verdict of not guilty.

 

Died, in this city on Monday, October 28, 1895, of blood poisoning, Mrs. Henry Stoeckle, aged about forty years. The deceased leaves a husband and ten children. The remains were interred in the Valle Spring Catholic cemetery on Tuesday.

 

An obituary notice of Mr. Alva Culver who died of hemorrhage of the lungs at Festus on October 29th, will be published next week. Mr. Culver was over 88 years of age.

 

While attending the funeral of Mrs. Henry Stoeckle last Tuesday Mrs. Joseph Kiefer was stricken with paralysis and is at present in a precarious condition.

 

Mrs. Frank Grieshaber died at her home in this city last Sunday morning, October 27, 1895, of typhoid fever at the age of twenty-five years. The remains were interred in the Valle Spring Catholic cemetery on Monday afternoon, Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout officiating. The deceased leaves a husband and three young children to mourn her loss.

 

Bloomsdale News.

Died, Oct. 25, 1895, Joseph Basler, son of Mr. Joe Basler, aged 7 years 4 months and 1 day.

 

Another inquest was held above Kinsey last Sunday over the dead body of James Vinyard.

 

Fair Play, November 9, 1895

Married, at Zell, on Tuesday, November 5, 1895 by Rev. Father Pigge, Miss Josephine Huck and Mr. Anton Fallert. The bride is a daughter of Collector F. J. Huck of this city.

 

Died, of consumption in St. Louis on Monday, Nov. 4, 1895, Miss Lizzie Schoof, aged 21 years. The remains were brought to Ste. Genevieve Tuesday night and interred in the Catholic cemetery at River aux Vases on Wednesday.

 

Died, in this city on Tuesday morning, November 5, 1895, of consumption, Mrs. Lizzie Naumann, nee Klein, wife of Mr. Christian Naumann, aged about 21 years. The deceased had been a sufferer from consumption for some time and her death was not unexpected. Only one year ago this month she was married at the Catholic Church to Mr. Naumann, who now has the sympathy of the entire community in the loss of a loving wife. The remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery at Valle Spring on Wednesday morning after a funeral high mass had been sung for the repose of the soul by Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout. The funeral was one of the largest ever witnessed in our city.

 

Mr. Henry Cocolise and Miss Louis Effrein were united in the holy bands of matrimony at the Catholic Church in this city by Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout on Tuesday last, November 5th, 1895, John and Mary Effrein, brother and sister of the bride, acted as groomsman and bridesmaid. A wedding supper was served in the evening at the residence of the bride’s parents to the relatives and a number of invited friends. A number of handsome and valuable wedding presents were received. The young couple have our best wishes for a future life of happiness and prosperity.

 

Capt. Gustavus St. Gem has returned from St. Louis where he went to have one of his eyes operated upon. Although confined to his room his sight is rapidly improving and the Captain will be able to get around in a few days. He was accompanied to St. Louis by Dr. C. J. Hertich of this city.

 

Obituary.

The subject of this sketch, Hon. Alva Culver, was born in the state of Vermont, June 2, 1807, and died of hemorrhage of the lungs at his home, five miles southeast of this city, October 29, 1895, at the ripe old age of 88 years, 4 months and 27 days.

 

Mr. Culver received a good common school education in his native state and at the age of 22 years came west and settled at Plainfield, Ill., when, two years later, he married a Miss Ashley, who bore him two children. She died six years after her marriage. Two years later he married her sister, who bore him eight children. She died at their present homestead January 12, 1893. Both children by his first wife and three by his last wife are dead. Though a poor boy when he settled in what was then the wilderness of Illinois, Mr. Culver, by his untiring energy, persevering industry and rare foresight soon gathered around him on a splended farm which he had acquired, an abundance of this world’s goods and he lived the life of a successful, independent farmer. In 1861, he, with his family moved to Ste. Genevieve county, Mo., near the city of Ste. Genevieve, where he owned a fine tract of land consisting of about 500 acres where he resided until 1891, when he purchased and removed to the homestead where he died today, about 10 o’clock A. M. (Lengthy editorial not transcribed).

 

Fair Play, November 16, 1895

Born, on Thursday, November 14, 1895, to the wife of Mr. Lucian Lalumondiere of Ste. Genevieve, a son.

 

A daughter was born to the wife of Mr. Charles C. Jokerst of this city, on Thursday, November 14, 1895.

 

Mrs. Reinhardt Stuppy died at her home in Zell on Wednesday, November 13, 1895, of consumption. The remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery at Zell on Friday morning after a funeral High Mass had been sung for the repose of the soul by Rev. Father Pigge. Mrs. Stuppy leaves a husband and four small children.

 

Cards are out announcing the coming marriage of Miss Anna Falk and Mr. Anthony Baum. The ceremony will take place at the Catholic Church on Wednesday morning, November 20th.

 

Joseph Schmiederer, one of the superintendents on the pile drivers at the Government Works here, met with an accident last Wednesday which caused his death that night about eight o’clock. While on his way to Ste. Genevieve the bank caved in on him covering him up completely. Assistance soon arrived and the unfortunate man was taken out more dead than alive. Dr. Moore, the government physician, and Dr. Rutledge of this city were called and did all in their power to save him, but to no avail. It was found that the man’s back was broken and that he had sustained internal injuries. The deceased resided in St. Louis where he leaves a wife and several small children. The remains were sent to St. Louis on Thursday for interment. Mr. Schmidderer was a man of good habits and was well thought of by his fellow-workmen. We understand that a brother of the deceased came near losing his life at the Government Works last year.

 

Fair Play, November 22, 1895

Mr. Alex Boillot of this city was married to Miss Mary Mangin at Union City, Tennessee, on Tuesday, Nov. 12th. The couple arrived in our city on Tuesday last and will reside here in the (illegible).

 

Miss Anna Falk of this city and Mr. Anton C. Baum of St. Louis were married at the Catholic Church in this city on Wednesday morning, November 20, 1895, at eight o’clock, by Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout. Miss Mable Falk of Ste. Genevieve and Mr. Henry Miller of St. Louis, were bridesmaid and groomsman. A sumptuous dinner was served at the residence of the bride’s parents.

 

The engagement of Miss Juliet Abell and Mr. Lawrence Norris is announced. The wedding is to occur in the spring. Miss Abell is teaching the Moehr’s school near Mudd’s Landing and is quite successful. Mr. Norris is a prominent business man of Richmond, Indiana.--Louisville Commercial.

 

Wesley Clark and wife, of Libertyville, Mo, aged 85 and 80 respectively, both died on the first inst. The last visit Mr. Clark made to Farmington before his death he purchased coffins for himself and wife. They had been married sixty four years.--Perryville Republican.

 

Last Thursday morning about seven o’clock fire totally destroyed the house of Harriet Thompson and almost wholly that of Lizzie Williams, two colored ladies, who leave near the North Gabourie creek. The fire engine was brought into service and did excellent work by saving the adjoining buildings as a strong wind was  blowing from the east and Mr. Leon Herzog’s house and barn were in imminent danger of catching on fire. Very little was saved by the unfortunate women as the fire, when discovered, had made such headway that it was almost impossible to enter the burning buildings. The cause of the fire is unknown, but it is supposed to have started by a spark falling on the roof.

 

Died, Oct. 25, 1895, of membraneous croup, Henry, the youngest child of J. E. and Harriett Boyd, aged 6 years, 7 months and 3 days. Little Henry was a bright, lovable child, and was the pet of all the family, and loved by all who knew him. His parents, brothers and sisters have have our heartfelt sympathy in their great bereavement.

 

The marriage of Mr. Henry Martin and Miss Alvena Bergman both of Modoc will be solemnized in the near future. Mr. Martin is a son of Andrew Martin and a grandson of Granny Brewer. Miss Bergman is the beautiful and accomplished daughter of Mr. Louis Bergman and sister-in-law of George Schefferdecker.

 

Madam Rumor says that Mr. Frank Hale and Zoe Horrell of Modoc are soon to marry.

 

Mr. Charley Heine and Miss Annie Donor, both of this place were married last Thursday by Rev. Father Krewet of Prairie du Rocher at St. Joseph’s Church. Quite a large crowd attended the home festivities and in the evening all participated in a dance. Guests from Evansville, Brewerville and Prairie du Rocher were in attendance. Mr. and Mrs. Heine are soon going to house-keeping in a lovely new house near Brewerville.

 

Modoc (Ill.,) News.

Gone to Rest:--Mrs. Eulalie Brewer one of the oldest and most respected ladies of Randolph county, Illinois, died October 25, 1895, at the home of her son David Martin. “Granny Brewer,” was she was known by every one, was a Miss Barbeau and was born near Prairie du Rocher, June 8th, 1807. She was married three times, her first husband being Batiste la Chappelle, by whom she had three children, Mary, Christine and an infant. After the death of Mr. la Chappelle she married Louis Martin. Five sons were the result of this union. Andrew, Edward, David, John and Ferdinand. She afterwards married Thomas Brewerville. They had no children, and after his death Granny made her home with her son, David Martin. She had been confined to her room for the past four years and death was indeed a relief to her sufferings. She leaves only the one son living, but has several grand children to mourn her loss. Among them are Mrs. Louis Chaudet of Prairie du Rocher, Mrs. Etienne Thompson of Brewerville, Mrs. Andrew Barbeau, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Thebo, Mrs. William Houston, and Louis, Thomas and Henry Martin. She was laid to rest in the cemetery at Prairie du Rocher and quite a large crowd followed the remains to the grave. She is at rest reaping the rewards of a well spent life.

 

Fair Play, November 30, 1895

Born, on Thursday, November 21, 1895, to the wife of Mr. Joseph Vaeth of Ste. Genevieve, a son.

 

Marriage licenses were issued this week to Joseph Doll, and Louise Yeagle, of St. Mary’s; Chas. Covington and Pearl Dickerson, of Perry county; Hermann Lotz and Mary Treaster, of Union township; Rudolph Schlosser and Lena Herter, of Ste. Genevieve, and John V. Caldwell and Mary Riney of St. Mary’s.

 

Married, on Wednesday, November 27, 1895, by Probate Judge Rozier, Mr. Herman Lotz and Miss Mary Treaster of Union township, this county.

 

Miss Lena Herter and Mr. Rudolph Schlosser of this city were married at the residence of the bride’s parents in Ste. Genevieve on Wednesday evening, November 27, 1895, at six o’clock by Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout. Miss Emma Herter and Miss Annie Wend were the bridesmaids and the groomsmen were Charles Petrequin and Andrew Herter. The wedding supper and reception were held at the residence of the bride’s parents after the marriage ceremony. The young people have numerous friends who join the Fair Play in wising them a life of happiness.

 

Fair Play, December 7, 1895

Charles W. Martin, editor of the Charleston Enterprise, died last week. He was the third victim of the small-pox in that town. Three other deaths from small pox occurred in Charleston the same week that Mr. Martin died.

 

Died, in St. Louis, on Tuesday, December 3, 1895, at 8 o’clock A. M., John, beloved husband of Elizabeth Clump Goggin.

 

Mrs. Peter Mai was tried before a jury in Probate Judge Rozier’s Court Tuesday and declared to be not capable of attending to her business affairs. The court then appointed Mr. Joseph Oberle as her legal guardian.

 

Married:--At the Catholic Church, on Wednesday evening, November 27, 1895, at six o’clock, Rev. Father Shaw officiating, Mr. Naree La Chance and Mrs. Amanda Roussin, attended by Miss Sophia Papin as bridesmaid and Mr. J. C. Van Alen as groomsman. Immediately after the ceremony. the bridal party repaired to the Shaw House, the home of the brides parents, Mr. and Mrs. T. F. White, where a number of invited guests were in waiting. After the usual congratulations were extended, all were invited to partake of a sumptuous wedding supper, which it is possibly needless to say was much enjoyed. The bride but shortly became a resident of Bonne Terre, having lately embarked in the millinery business here, but has already gained the respect and good will of a large circle of friends and acquaintances. Mr. LaChance is an employe of the Democrat Register office, and has the confidence and esteem of his employer as also the respect of all who know him. To the happy couple, whose loving hearts have been united, we extend our best wishes for a longlife full of happiness.--Bonne Terre Democrat-Register.

 

Mr. Charles Rottler departed for St. Louis yesterday by way of Chester, having been summoned as a witness, by the U. S. Marshal, in the case of Joseph Caddell, one of the “flunkies” at the Government Works here, who is accused of forgery. The following clipping is from last Friday’s Globe Democrat:

Joseph J. Caddell, a waiter in the employ of the Government Works at Ste. Genevieve, was arrested in the city yesterday evening about 6 o’clock by Detective Archambault on a charge of forgery. The charge was preferred some time ago by John E. Murphy, of the secret service, who received advice from Washington City with the request  to examine into the matter, as Caddell was suspected of irregularities, Mr. Murphy, when seen at his residence, 2929 Olive street, last night, said that Caddell had been guilty of rais-two checks, one from $6 to $60 and the other from $4 50 to $45, last October. One of the checks was payable to Caddell and the other to another employe, and both were cashed at the Sub-Treasury in this city on the 23th ult. When the checks were sent to Washington it was found that both had been raised. The work was rather cleverly done, but suspicion was aroused by reason of the fact that the one calling for $45 read upon its face “fourty” in place of forty. So far as he knew, Mr. Murphy said that Caddell had not been guilty of any other frauds. Caddell had been in the Government employ two months when he was suspected of the offense. He is a book keeper and at one time was clerk in the Lafayette Hotel, in New Orleans.

 

Fair Play, December 14, 1895

Bart. and Henry Eichenlaub were tried before a jury in ‘Squire Cox’s Court Tuesday and fined $10 and costs. They were charged with assaulting _____DeWitt of St. Louis on the public highway last Sunday about noon.

 

Mrs. Mary Bell was tried before a jury in Probate Judge Rozier’s Court Monday and declared insane. Sheriff Biel conveyed her to the asylum at Fulton Wednesday.

 

We are informed that Miss Annie Moore, who formerly lived here, was married on November 20, 1895, to Mr. Albert Amcell of Kelso, Mo.

 

Born, on Friday, November 29, 1895, to the wife of Mr. Frank Keuhn of Ste. Genevieve, a daughter.

 

The trial of Joseph Caddell, charged with forgery, in the U. S. Court in St. Louis, did not take place last Saturday and Mr. Charles Rottler was obliged to make another trip to St. Louis this week.

 

By order of the city board men are at work digging a cistern on Market street, near the Lutheran Church. This move is for the purpose of having more water on hand in case of fire. Mr. Amadee Boyer is superintending the work.

 

Fair Play, December 21, 1895

A marriage license was issued this week to Adam Kolb and Mary Chesters of Modoc, Ill.

 

Died, on Sunday, December 15, 1895, Miss Matilda Moro, aged eighteen years. The remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery at Valle Spring on Monday.

 

Miss___Otte died at her home in New Bremen of typhoid fever on Monday, December 16, 1895, at the age of thirteen years. The remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery at River aux Vases on Tuesday.

 

Died, in Thursday, December 19, 1895, at the advanced age of eighty-four years, Mrs. Victoria Burgert, wife of the late Bartholomew Burgert. The remains were laid to rest in the Valle Spring Catholic cemetery on Friday morning after a funeral High Mass had been sung for the repose of the soul by Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout.

 

Mr. Benjamin Effrein died at his home in this city on Saturday morning, December 14, 1895, at one o’clock, at the age of fifty one years. Mr. Effrein had been an invalid for some time and was confined to his room the year previous to his death. He leaves a wife and six children, two girls and four boys, to mourn his death. The remains were interred in the Valle Spring Catholic cemetery on Sunday afternoon at four o’clock.

 

Fair Play, December 28, 1895

Born, on Wednesday, December 25, 1895, to the wife of Henry Moreau, a son.

 

Minnith, Mo, Dec. 23, 1895.

Louis Duvall died suddenly the other day from congestive chill at the age of 50 years.

 

Minnith News.

Louis Duvall died suddenly on the 14th ult. of heat failure. The remains were interred in Saline cemetery Sunday.

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