Fair Play; 1893 (Jan 7 – Dec 30)

Fair Play, January 7, 1893

Born, on Friday, December 30, 1892, to the wife of Mr. Andrew Wilder of this city, a son.

 

Born, on Thursday, January 5th, 1893, to the wife of Mr. Lawrence Govro of this city, a son.

 

Married, at the Catholic Church in this city on Wednesday, January 4, 1893, by Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout, Mr. Thomas Hauck and Miss Annie Linderer, both of Ste. Genevieve.

 

Died, in St. Louis, on Sunday, January 1, 1893, of typhoid fever, Mr. Charles Will aged 26 years and two months. Mr. Will was born and raised in Ste. Genevieve and moved to St. Louis about six years ago. He leaves a wife and two small children to mourn his loss. The remains were interred on Tuesday, January 3, at two o’clock P. M.

 

Notice--$25.00 Reward.

On the 11th day of November, 1892, one Claude Miller persuaded my 12 year-old son from home and I have not since heard from them. I will pay $25 and reasonable expenses to any person delivering the boy to me at Pocahontas, Ark.

 

I here give description of both of them: Miller is about 18 years old, spare made, and has a sore leg (I don’t know which leg). The boy is 12 years old, small for one of his age, black hair and eyes; has scar on left cheek under eye, caused by kick of a mule; name Arthur Moore.

 

I am sick and unable to search for them. Any information leading to the discovery of the boy will be thankfully received and rewarded as above set out. All papers please copy and assist in relieving the suspense of anxious parents.  Newton Moore.

 

Fair Play, January 14, 1893

Born, on Friday, January 6, 1893, to the wife of Mr. William Eichenlaub of this city, a daughter.

 

Ste. Genevieve is troubled with ghosts (?) again. Our city marshall captured one last Monday night.

 

Miss Laura Spray and Mr. Benj. Winston of this city were married at Chester, Ill., on Monday last, January 9th, 1893.

 

We are informed that our young friend, Fred. Chouteau, applied to the Minnesota Legislation last week and had his name changed from Chouteau to Laclede.

 

Died, in St. Louis on Saturday, January 7, 1892, of Bright’s disease, Mr. Firmin A. Boyer, aged 42 years, 8 months and 3 days. The deceased was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Jules Boyer of this city and resided in Ste. Genevieve until about ten years ago when he moved to St. Louis and lived there up to the time of his death. He leaves a wife and three small children to mourn his loss. The remains were interred in St. Louis on Sunday last.

 

Mrs. Sebastian Geiler died at her home in this city on Tuesday, January 10, 1892, at 11:30 o’clock A. M. of lung troubles, at the age of 58 years, 14 months and 2 days.  Mrs. Geiler had been in poor health for some time and about a week before her death was attacked with congestive chills.

 

The deceased, whose maiden name was Victoria Falk, was born on September 8, 1834, in Rammersweiher, amt Offenburg, Baden, Germany, and came to America with her parents in 1845, settling at New Tennessee in this county. She was married to Mr. Sebastian Geiler on April 8, 1858, and to this union nine children were born--five sons and four daughters, of whom four sons, Frank, Peter, Joseph and William, and three daughters,  Emily, Mary and Louise are living. Mr. Geiler, husband of the deceased, died nine years ago.

 

Mrs. Geiler was reared in the Catholic faith and received the Sacraments of that Church  before her death. The funeral was conducted from the Catholic Church on Wednesday at three o’clock P. M., Rev Father C. L. van Tourenhout officiating. The remains were interred in the Valle Spring Catholic Cemetery and were followed to the grave by a large concourse of relatives and friends. The Fair Play extends sympathy to the sorrowing children in their loss of a kind and loving mother. R. I. P.

 

The following account of the marriage of Miss Emma Boyer, daughter of Mr. Jules Boyer of this city, is taken from the San Angelo, Texas, Standard:

 

Married, in San Angelo, Texas, at the residence of George Bond, at a few minutes past four o’clock, last Thursday afternoon, January 5th, 1893, Mr. Lanardus Guthals to Miss Emma Mary Boyer, Rev. Father J. B. Rigand, of the Roman Catholic church officiating. Mr. August Schild and Miss Katie Preusser acted as groomsman and bridesmaid. It was a very private affair only a very few friends being present, among whom were Mr. and Mrs. George Bond, Miss Mary Wenger, Mrs. Paul Briesh and J. G. Murphy. The bride looked lovely in a nice fitting black silk, white vail and orange blossoms and the groom never appeared handsomer in a neat fitting suit of black. Shortly after the ceremony an adjournment was made to the dining parlor where Mr. and Mrs. Bond gave the bridal party a sumptuous dinner.

 

The bride came to Texas from Ste. Genevieve, Mo., about a year ago and the groom, who is an honorably and promising young gentleman, came from Nebraska nearly a year previous. The Standard’s best wishes go with Mr. and Mrs.  Guthals.

 

At night a reception and hop was tendered the newly wedded at the Turn Verein hall, by their intimate friends, and the guests, to put it mildly, enjoyed themselves with the aid of refreshments and the soul stirring strains of McDannell’s orchestra.

 

Southeast Missouri.

 

Mules are used on the street cars at Cape Girardeau.

 

There is a movement on foot in Fredericktown to establish an electric light and an ice plant.

 

A man named Dennis Couyers dropped dead on the street in Cape Girardeau last week. He leaves a family in destitute circumstances.

 

C. E. Petrie and Joe Marty of Poplar Bluff recently performed the supposed hard task of eating thirty quails each in thirty days, a quail a day.

 

Frank Goza, Jas. Burns and Henry Brooks got into a fight at Bienlein’s beer house one day last week, and the row came near resulting in death to Mr. Burns. The fight, of course, came out of the beer keg, or, partly, perhaps, out of some drugstore where whiskey is being sold in violation of the law. Goza stabbed Burns in the neck with a knife, inflicting a wound about two inches deep. The cut man bled profusely, and after walking a short distance from the beer house, sank down exhausted, it is said from the loss of blood. The knife barely missed cutting one of the large veins of the neck, and fortunate it was for James Burns that it did so. Drs. Henderson and Vineyard were called and stopped the flow of blood from Burn’s wound and it was not long until he was considered out of danger. Goza also slashed Brooks with his knife, cutting the skin along his breast or side. Marshal Cooley arrested Goza and put him in jail. He was brought before ‘Squire Grant, waived examination and was remanded to jail to await the action of the grand jury.--Jackson Cash-Book.

 

Fair Play, January 21, 1893

Born, on Sunday, January, 1, 1893, to the wife of Mr. Charles Fallert of Zell, a son.

 

Born, on Friday, January 13, 1893, to the wife of Mr. Oscar Boyer, of St. Louis, a son.

 

From a private telegram received here Thursday we learn that the citizens of St. Mary’s have already subscribed $20,000 towards the building of the railroad through this county.

 

Miss Julia Lanbourg died at her home in St. Louis on Monday, January 9, 1893, of pneumonia, at the age of seventeen years. The deceased was a niece of Mrs. Mary Operle of this city.

 

During the past week marriage licenses have been issued to William T. Marshal and Nancy J. Moore, St. Mary’s; Edward Linderer and Justine Gisi, Ste. Genevieve; Wendel Iseman and Annie Ott, Union Township, and Meinrod S. Donze, Ste. Genevieve, and Annie M. Hurst, Beauvais township.

 

Married, on Tuesday, January 17, 1893, at the Catholic Church in this city by Rev. Father C. L. an Tourenhout, Miss Justine Gisi and Mr. Edward Linderer. The bride is the daughter of Mr. Valerian Gisi and the groom is the son of Mr. Ignatius Linderer, both well to do farmers of our community. The Fair Play extends congratulations.

 

News was received here last Friday, January 13, 1893, of the death of Mrs. Amie A. Culver, wife of Mr. Alva Culver, who died at her home near Festus on the above date, at the age of 66 years.  Until recently Mr. and Mrs. Culver were residents of Ste. Genevieve, and Mr. Culver has many friends here who sympathize with him in his sad loss.

 

Died, on Friday morning, December 23, 1893, at Lawrenceton, Ste. Genevieve County, Missouri of cancer, Juliette Janis, aged 59 years, 4 months and 23 days. The remains were interred in the Catholic Cemetery at French Village, Rev. Father Schaefer officiating. She was born at Ste. Genevieve on July 31, 1833. She had numerous relatives and friends in Bonne Terre and was esteemed and respected by all who knew her. A brother survives to mourn her loss. Bonne Terre Democrat.

 

Born, to the wife of Mr. Eloy Drury of Bloomsdale, on Friday, January, 13, 1893, a son.

 

Born, on Wednesday, January 11, 1893, to the wife of Mr. Cyp. Boyer of this city, a daughter.

 

We are informed that our friend Mr. Joseph Langhardt, is ill with typhoid fever.

 

Fair Play, January 28, 1893

Born, on Monday, January 16, 1893, to the wife of Mr. Anton Kirchner of Kinsey, a son.

 

Born, on Sunday, January 15, 1893, to the wife of Mr. Nicholas Kertz of Bloomsdale, a son.

 

Alex Jennings of near Bloomsdale was tried before a jury in ‘Squire Boyer’s court last Wednesday charged with stealing a number of pigs from Mr. John A. Poston. The jury brought in a verdict of guilty and sentenced the defendant to twenty days in jail. He was brought to town and placed in jail Wednesday night. Prosecuting Attorney Huck represented the State at the trial.

 

Obituary.

Mrs. Mary Louise Gibson, one of Ste. Genevieve’s oldest citizens, departed this life on Wednesday, January 25, 1893, at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. Mary Mueller in this city, at the advanced age of 88 years. Mrs. Gibson was always ready to assist others in sickness, sorrow and trouble, and was loved and respected by all who knew her. Before her death she received the last holy sacraments of the Catholic Church. She leaves one daughter, Mrs. Mary Mueller and three grandsons, Charles W. Rippe of St. Louis, William H. Rippe of Alton, and John Gibson of this city; also two adopted grand-daughters, Mrs. Rachel Babb and Miss Rosa Mueller, to mourn her loss.

 

The funeral was conducted from the Catholic Church on Thursday afternoon at three o’clock, Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout officiating. A large concourse of mourning relatives and friends followed the body to its last resting place at Valle Spring cemetery.

 

Minnith News.

Mr. Elias Boland, who now resides in Crystal City, came down last week and spent a few days with his father, Mr. Peter Boland who has been unwell for some time past.

 

Mrs. Ann McKee had the misfortune last Saturday evening to break her arm by a fall from a road cart. She was turning the horse when the cart was over-turned.

 

The rising generations are fast multiplying in this vicinity. Born, to the wife of Ferdinand Litterst, a son on the 17th inst.

 

To the wife of John Griffard, Jr., a girl.

 

To the wife of August Nanney, a girl.  Mrs. Nanney is not expected to live.

 

To the wife of Emile Cambron, a child.

 

Fair Play, February 4, 1893

The infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Babb died yesterday morning.

 

A daughter was born to Mrs. George LaRose of this city on Sunday last, January 29th.

 

The Menard old homestead will be sold during County Court week, Wednesday, February 15th.

 

Born, to the wife of Dr. S. F. Thurman of Blackwell, Mo., on Thursday, January 26, 1892, a son.

 

Born, on Saturday, January 28th, 1893, to the wife of Mr. Frank Babb of this city, a daughter.

 

A child of Mr. and Mrs. William Silvery died at Doe Run last week and was buried at the Valle Spring Catholic cemetery here Friday last.

 

John J. Vaeth of Weingarten purchased the Woerner farm about two miles north of this city from Charles J. Wilder this week for the sum of $4,000.

 

Born, on Wednesday morning, January 25, 1893, shortly after midnight, to the wife of Mr. Joseph Flynn, editor of the DeSoto Gazette, a son, weighing ten pounds.

 

Married, on Wednesday, February 1, 1893, at the Catholic Church in this city by Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout, Mr. Meinrod S. Donze and Miss Anna M. Hurst.

 

Henry Gremminger was arrested last Monday on a warrant charging him with assault on the twelve year-old daughter of Mr. Joseph Palmer of Bremen. He was placed under $800 bond.  The preliminary hearing will take place before ‘Squire Cox next Thursday, February 9th.

 

Obituary.

Died, at the residence of his father-in-law, in the northern part of this county, on Decemper 31, 1892, William Henry Elders, aged 35 years. Deceased was afflicted with consumption which kept him very close at home during the last years of his life. He was born near Lawrenceton, this county, and lived there until he was six years old; he then moved to St. Francois county, near Farmington, and six years ago was married to Miss Maggie Roberts, who, with two bright little girls, survive him. Mr. Elders professed religion sixteen years ago and was united with the M. E. Church South and lived a consistent christian and a strong believer in that faith till he died--crossed over the river without pain bearing a smile on his face. His loving companions and friends did all in their power for him. Mr. Elders had his life insured and leaves to his wife a good life policy.

 

Fair Play, February 11, 1893

Four of our youngsters determined to join in a Jesse James organization the other day, and started out for the wild west on foot. They reached Herculaneum about noon, tired and hungry, they began operations by trying to capture a goose. They met with resistance however, as an armed force of young lads faced them with blood in their eyes, and our festive dime novels broke and run. They reached home a sad but wiser lot of boys. What are their names did you say? We were requested not to tell, but we guess the boys won’t get mad. They were: Willie Coleman, John Martin, Joe McCoy and George Cortouis.--Festus Chronicle.

 

Miss Maggie Nifong died at her home near Coffman, Ste. Genevieve county, on the 27th ult., aged 18 years.--Times.

 

Married, in this city on Tuesday, February 7, 1892, by Rev. Father Weiss, Mr. Charles Weiss and Mrs. Mary Straasburg.

 

The marriage of Mr. Henry Hoog and Miss Lizzie Krater will take place at St. Mary’s Monday next. A grand ball will be given at Difani hall in the evening.

 

The Menard old homestead will be sold at the Court House next Wednesday, February 15th. An excellent opportunity to purchase a home.

 

Born, to the wife of Joe Spott Thurman, near Mill Post Office, in Ste. Genevieve county, on the 29th ult., triplets, one living and two dead.--Farmington Times.

 

Mr. Gottfried Ehler and Miss Anna Hoog were married at the Catholic Church in this city on Tuesday, February 7, 1893, Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout officiating.

 

We learn with pleasure that our young friend, Frank Schmahle, has purchased half interest in the Cameron Herald, a bright and newsy paper published at Cameron, Texas. Frank is an industrious young man and deserves success.

 

The preliminary hearing of Henry Gremminger, charged with assault, took place before ‘Squire Cox Thursday and the defendant was bound over in the sum of $800 to await the action of the grand jury. He gave bond for his appearance.

 

Siebert--Langhardt.

Mr. Ed. L. Siebert and Miss Nettie E. Langhardt were united in the holy bonds of matrimony at the residence of the groom’s brother, Mr. Henry L. Siebert, Thursday evening, February 9, 1893, at 6:30 o’clock, Rev. Father Weiss performing the ceremony. The bride was assisted by Misses Fannie Langhardt and Annie Rehm and Messrs. Andrew Siebert and Tom Jokerst were the groomsmen.

 

The ceremony over, the wedding party repaired to Union Hall where a dance was given in honor of the nuptials. The hall was crowded with the friends of the newly wedded couple and after a grand march, led by the bride and groom, dancing was participated in and continued until a late hour.

 

The groom is the son of Mr. Andrew Siebert and is one of Jokerst & Bros’. popular salesmen. He is highly respected by all who know him.

 

The bride is the handsome daughter of Mr. Joseph Langhardt and is employed as teacher in the Primary Department of our Public Schools.

 

The presents received were numerous and valuable, the finest seen at a wedding in Ste. Genevieve for some time.

 

Died.

Henry Lawrence Jokerst, son of Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence E. Jokerst, died very suddenly at 6 o’clock P. M. last Friday, February 3, 1893, of congestion of the brain. The young man was helping to dig a cistern at the home of his uncle and about three o’clock in the afternoon complained of a severe headache. A doctor was immediately sent for and everything possible was done to relieve the sufferings of the young man but all in vain.

 

Deceased was born on the 27th of October 1876 and was therefore a little over sixteen years of age at the time of his death. Mr. and Mrs. Jokerst have the sympathy of all in their sad loss. The funeral occurred from the Catholic Church on Sunday at 2 P. M. and was largely attended. Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout performed the last sad rites.

 

Died, on Friday, February 3, 1893, Addie, infant daughter of Frank and Rachel Babb, aged six days.

 

Fair Play, February 18, 1893

Born, on Wednesday, January 18, 1893, to the wife of Mr. Herman Roseman of St. Mary’s, a son.

 

The Menard old homestead was sold at public sale last Wednesday. Mr. William W. Wilder purchased it for the sum of $1,310.

 

Mrs. Frank Spraul was tried before a jury in the Probate Court Wednesday and declared insane. She will be conveyed to the asylum at Fulton by Sheriff Biel today.

 

Married, at St. Mary’s on Tuesday, February 14, 1893, by Rev. Father E. J. Wynne, Mr. John Fischer of St. Charles, Mo., and Miss Magdalena Tlapek of St. Mary’s.

 

Married, at the Catholic Church in this city on Monday, February 13, 1893, by Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout, Mr. Joseph Kohm and Miss Sophie Kiefer, both of Ste. Genevieve.

 

Minnith News.

Married, on Tuesday, January 24, by ‘Squire Layton, Vincent Cambron and Miss Louise Voelker.

 

Charles W. Voelker will have a public sale at his place on Saturday, February 18. He is going to move to Mississippi county.

 

John Voelker is visiting here from Mississippi county. We understand he will soon move to Scott county.

 

Fair Play, February 25, 1893

Married, on Thursday, February 23, 1893, by Probate Judge Koehler, Mr. John Barr and Miss Minnie Kalb, both of Randolph county, Ill.

 

The case of Tim Bono arrested on the charge of carrying concealed weapons came up before ‘Squire Harrelson of Chestnut Ridge last Monday, but the jury could not agree to a verdict and were discharged. He plead guilty to common assault on Hiram Silvey and was fined $1 and costs. Prosecuting Attorney Huck of this city and Merril Pipkin of Farmington represented the State and George Wilson of Farmington was the defendant’s lawyer.

 

Orange Blossoms.

Mr. Henry Hoog, a prosperous and prominent young farmer living in upper Bois Brule, and Miss Lizzie Kratter, an efficient daughter of Mrs. Sarah Kratter, of near St. Mary’s and also assistant teacher in the public school of Brewer, were united in the holy bonds of matrimony last Monday, February 13, at St. Mary’s, Rev. Father Wynne officiating. The attendants were Mr. Louis Hoog, brother of the groom and Miss Philmena Kratter, sister of the bride. The young couple was met at the church by their many friends to witness the imposing ceremonies. After the ceremony was performed the young couple repaired to the home of the bride, followed by an extended procession of friends who had gathered to extend congratulations and partake of the wedding festivities. A most delicious dinner was spread and partaken of with great relish. Presents in abundance were tendered the young couple. After the wedding feast was served the merry assemblage repaired to Difani’s Hall where the air was filled with sweet strains of music and the tripping of the fantastic was indulged in until a late hour.

 

Fair Play, March 4, 1893

Born, on Saturday, February 25, 1893, to the wife of Mr. Ralph Panchot of this city, a son.

 

Jaspar, the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Damas F. Drury of Bloomsdale, died last Wednesday afternoon.

 

Twins (boys) were born to the wife of Etienne Robinson (colored) of this city last Monday morning, February 27th, 1893.

 

Mr. Louis Houck of Cape Girardeau was here again this week talking railroad to our people. Mr. Houck has abandoned his plan of building the road from Cape Girardeau through Perryville, Ste. Genevieve, Zell, Bloomsdale, etc. and now proposes to build a road from Claryville to Ste. Genevieve and then to Farmington over the old roadbed on the Saline. This route would make Ste. Genevieve the terminus of the road. We understand Mr. Houck will solicit subscription from our citizens for this proposed route.

 

Mr. and Mrs. George Grass celebrated their Golden Wedding at Mr. Frank J. Huck’s residence in Zell last Tuesday, Feb. 28, 1893. In the morning, a High Mass was celebrated by Rev. Father Pigge, after which the party repaired to Mr. Huck’s residence and enjoyed themselves until midnight. Many beautiful presents were received, the first of which was a gold jog filled with peach brandy.  Mr. Grass came to America on the 14th of February, 1843, and was married to Miss Mary A. Siebert by Rev. Father Prince at the Catholic Church in this city, on Feb. 28, 1843.  Twelve children were born to them, nine of whom are living, six girls and three boys. All were present at the celebration except Mrs. Julia Ott, who lives at Salisbury, Mo. Mr. and Mrs. Grass had sixty-nine grand-children, fifty six of whom are still living. The Fair Play extends congratulations and wishes for Mr. and Mrs. Grass many more years of happiness.

 

Died, in this city on Saturday, February 25, 1893, of consumption, Mr. Leon Labruyere, aged 29 years, one week and two days.

Deceased was a young man very highly respected by both old and young. He leaves many mourning friends and relatives, among the latter an aged mother whose chief support he was.

 

Minnith News.

Mr. Henry McFarland was married last Wednesday to a Miss Bloom, daughter of Mr. John Bloom both of New Tennessee, this county. The wedding dinner was given by the mother of the groom, Mrs. Elizabeth Rimboch, wife of Charles N. Rimboch. Quite a number of young ladies and gentlemen was present from New Tennessee.

 

Fair Play, March 11, 1893

Died, the son of Mr. and Mrs. D. F. Drury of Bloomsdale, died of pneumonia last Wednesday at three o’clock A. M. and was burried Thursday at nine o’clock A. M. He was eleven months and twenty-one days old and leaves his parents and little brother, Oliver, and also friends to mourn his loss.

 

Mrs. Zelena Frichette, wife of Mr. John Frichette, died suddenly at her home in this city last Sunday evening at 7:30 o’clock of heart disease, at the age of 68 years, 11 months and 25 days. Mrs. Frichette, whose maiden name was Zelena Winston, was born in this city on March 9, 1824. She was the mother of ten children, only three of whom are living. The deceased leaves a husband, three children and a host of relatives and friends to mourn her  loss.  The funeral was conducted from the Catholic Church on Tuesday afternoon, Rev. Father Weiss performing the last sad rites.

 

The old Boverie dwelling house on 3rd street was torn down this week.

 

Mr. George Sexauer is dangerously ill with inflammation of the bowels.

 

Fair Play, March 18, 1893

The sixteen months-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Buehler died in this city on Wednesday and was buried in the Valle Spring Catholic cemetery on Thursday afternoon.

 

Sheriff Biel arrested John Laskowski on Wednesday on a warrant from Jefferson county charging him with maliciously wounding animals. The prisoner was placed in jail and the sheriff of Jefferson county telegraphed to.

 

The trial of Mrs. Armenia Byington, charged with the murder of her step child in this county one year ago this month, took place in Potosi last week and resulted in an acquittal. The jury remained out about three hours.

 

Owen Mackley is lying dangerously ill of typhoid fever at City Marshal Meyer’s residence.

 

Born, on Monday, March 13, 1893, to the wife of Mr. Ulrich Burkhardt of this city, a son.

Mr. Xavier Govro had the misfortune to fall and break his shoulder last Sunday evening.

 

The two year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Schirman of Bonne Terre died in that city on Sunday, March 5th.

 

Farmington was visited by another fire Wednesday morning. The store of S. S. Smith, with all its contents, was burned to the ground.

 

Married, in this city on Sunday, March 12, 1893, by Judge Koehler, Mr. James McCabe of Perry county and Miss Margret Nanney of St. Louis.

 

Mr. John Koetting moved his jewelry shop this week into his building a few doors west of his former place.  Mr. Dehe has moved into Mr. Koetting’s old stand.

 

The many friends of Mr. John Flynn of Richwoods, will be pained to learn of the serious illness of Mr. Flynn, at his home in Richwoods. He has been confined to his room for the past three or four weeks, and is suffering from a pulmonary trouble. We hope to learn of his recovery soon.--Potosi Independent.

 

Bloomsdale News.

 

Born, on March 11, 1893, to the wife of Mr. Levi LaRose, a son.

 

Born, on March 11, 1893, to the wife of Mr. Geo. Carron, a son.

 

Born, on March 6, 1893, to the wife of John C. Drury, a son. Mrs. Drury was expected to die for a few days, but we are glad to say that she is now on the path of recovery.

 

Fair Play, March 25, 1893

Born,  to the wife of Dr. J. B. Roberts of this city on Friday, March 24, 1893, a son.

 

Born, to Mr. and Mrs. Valentine Effinger of Pilot Knob, Mo., on Thursday, March 9, 1893, a son.

 

Toby Grieshaber was tried before a jury in Mayor Rozier’s court last Friday and fined one dollar for disturbing the peace of Mr. C. Motzel.

 

The trial of Tim Bono, charged with carrying concealed weapons, took place before ‘Squire Harrelson at Chestnut Ridge last Monday. The case was hotly contested on both sides, Prosecuting Attorney Huck and Merril Pipkin representing the State, and Lawyers Wilson and Abernathy of Farmington appearing for the defendant. The jury returned a verdict finding the prisoner guilty and sentencing him to five days in jail, or to pay a fine of $50.

 

Sheriff Buren of Jefferson county arrived here on the Idlewild last Friday night and departed on Sunday for Hillsboro having in charge John Laskowski, who is charged with maliciously wounding animals in that county. The prisoner was arrested by Sheriff Biel one day last week.

 

The infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Zeriack Wipfler died on Monday of this week and was buried at the Valley Spring Catholic cemetery on Wednesday.

 

Died, at Festus, Mo., on Thursday, March 23, 1893, at one o’clock P. M of bronchitis, Mr. Frank X. Okenfuss, aged 35 years and 10 months.

 

The deceased was born in this city on May 11, 1857, and left here about twelve years ago. Four years ago he moved to Festus and worked at the carpenter trade at that place up to the time of his death. He had been ailing for several months, but was only confined to his bed for one week. Mr. Okenfuss is the son of Mrs. Barbara Okenfuss of our city and leaves a mother, five brothers and one sister to mourn his loss.

 

The remains were brought here from Festus on Thursday night and interred in the Valle Spring Catholic cemetery on Friday afternoon at three o’clock, Rev. Father Weiss performing the last sad rited. A large concourse of mourning friends and relatives followed the body to its last resting place. R. I. P.

 

Fair Play, April 1, 1893

Born, on Thursday, March 30, 1893, to the wife of Joseph Oil (colored) of this city, a daughter.

 

John Joseph, the five months’ old child of Mr. and Mrs. George Steigle of this city, died yesterday morning.

 

Died, at St. Mary’s on Saturday, March 25th, 1893, Rhoda wife of William Chandler, at the age of 50 years.

 

Fair Play, April 8, 1893

Married in this city by Judge Koehler, on April 6, 1893, Mr. John Thomure and Miss Mary E. Voelker, both of Beauvais township, this county.

 

The two year old child of Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Cambron of this city died of  bronchitis on Friday, March 31, 1893. The remains were interred in the Catholic Cemetery on Saturday.

 

Charles Grover, the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Grover Clevlen,  died at the residence of Mr. Chas. H. Biel in this city last Sunday, April 2, 1893. The remains were interred in the Lutheran cemetery on Tuesday.

 

Born, on Friday, March 31, 1893, to the wife of Mr. H. C. Ziegler of this city, a daughter.

 

The infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Gus. Crump died on Saturday April 1st, and was buried on Sunday afternoon.

 

Mrs. Charlotte Clark was stricken with paralysis on Wednesday of this week and is at present dangerously ill at her home in this city.

 

Bridal Bulletin.

The following marriage licenses were issued by Recorder Bogy this week:

 

Frank Schweiss....... Bloomsdale

Felician Drury.....Bloomsdale

 

T. A. Bryan........Saline Township

Mary Baumann....Beauvais Township

 

F. X. Roth.........Beauvais Township

Caroline Baumann.....Beauvais Township

 

Conrad Bachle......Ste. Genevieve

Louise Schmelzle.....Ste. Geneveive

 

John Thomure........Beauvais Township

Mary E. Voelker.....Beauvais Township

 

Bloomsdale’s Batch.

 

Born, on March 28, 1893, to Mrs. Joseph Eisenbeis, a son.

 

Married.

Married, on Tuesday, April 4, 1893, at the Catholic Church at this place, Mr. Frank Schweiss and Miss Felician Drury, Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout of Ste. Genevieve, officiating.

 

Mr. Schweiss has been engaged in the mercantile business at this place for several years and has proved to be a successful young clerk of whom his spouse may be proud, but not less may he rejoice for having selected for his companion one of our most charming and amiable young ladies, the daughter of Mr. Clem Drury. The couple left for St. Louis Wednesday evening on a bridal tour and will make this place their future home. Misses Emily Drury and Frances Schweiss were the bridesmaids and Messrs. Charles and Theodore Drury acted as groomsmen. The fine dinner and supper which had been prepared at the residence of the bride’s father can not be to highly complimented as all of the best was on hand and beer was plentiful. All who participated had their portion of enjoyment. May they live a long and happy life is the wish of your correspondent. (a list of presents was not transcribed).

 

Fair Play, April 15, 1893

Prosecuting Attorney Huck went to Chestnut Ridge Tuesday to attend the trial of J. D. Silvey, charged with disturbing the peace. The trial came off in ‘Squire Harrelson’s court and the State was represented by Prosecuting Attorney Huck and J. B. Burks of Farmington. J. A. Abernathy conducted the case for the defendant. Silvey was fined $1 and costs, but took an appeal to the Circuit Court.

 

Fred Pinkston and Arnold Byington were tried before ‘Squire Pinkerton at Mill last Monday charged with disturbing a prayer meeting and were found guilty and fined $1 and costs.  Byington paid his fine and Pinkston is serving his time out in jail. Prosecuting Attorney Huck was on hand for the State and ‘Squire Rickard plead the case for the defendants.

 

Fair Play, April 22, 1893

Since our last issue marriage licenses were issued to August Geiler and Theresa Fallert of Ste. Genevieve, and Frances X. Ruebsam of Ste. Genevieve and Theresa Kirchner of Lawrenceton.

 

Henry Willis, charged with murder in Perry county, has taken a change of venue to this county and was brought here on the Idlewild last Sunday. His trial will not take place before October.

 

The body of a male floater about twenty-five years of age was found in the river last Tuesday, April 18th, by Bernhardt Grieshaber and Will LaRose. A jury summoned and a coroners inquest was held on the following morning and, after a post mortem examination had been held by Coroner Rutledge showing that the skull had been fractured, the jury brought in a verdict that the deceased had come to his death by foul means. A silver watch and chain, $4.20 in silver and a C. K. of A. badge were found in the pockets of the dead man. A telegram was sent to St. Louis and on Thursday three gentlemen arrived here and recognized the articles found on the dead body as belonging to Herman Hushler who accidently drowned while crossing the river at St. Louis on the 22nd of January. The deceased was a native of Germany and has no relatives in this country. His life was insured for $1,000 in the C. K. of A. and made payable to his parents who reside in Germany. His body had been buried in the City cemetery but was taken up yesterday and interred in the Catholic cemetery.

 

Mr. I. H. Rodehaver of Farmington was here the early part of this week talking electric lights to our citizens. There seems to be a disposition on the part of our people to organize an electric and ice plant in Ste. Genevieve. The plant would cost in the neighborhood of $9,000. Mr. Rodehaver will return to Ste. Genevieve today and submit his proposition to the City Council at their meeting tonight. The city will be asked to take twenty-five lights at a cost of only double what our street lamps now cost. We hope our city fathers will look at this matter in the right light and if they do, there is no doubt but that Ste. Genevieve will soon be lighted with electricity.

 

Married, at the Catholic Church in this city on Monday, April 17, 1893, by Rev. Father van Tourenhout, Nerius Brewer of Perry county and Miss Wilhelmina Hoog of this county.

Mr. Henry Jokerst died at his home near the Copper Mines last Saturday, April 15, 1893, at the age of 38 years, of consumption. The remains were interred in the City cemetery at Valle Spring on Sunday, Prof. A. J. Sparks performing the ceremony. The deceased leaves a wife and five small children to mourn his loss.

 

Born, on Tuesday, April 18, 1893, to the wife of Mr. Frank LaGrave of St. Louis, a son.

 

Obituary.

Died, in this city on Saturday, April 15, 1893, at one o’clock P. M. of paralysis, Mrs. Charlotte Clark, aged 69 years, 2 months and 1 day.

 

Mrs. Clark was stricken with paralysis on the 5th inst. and was recovering rapidly from the shock when she was attacked by a second stroke on Friday morning last week from which she never rallied, dying at one o’clock Saturday afternoon.

 

The deceased, whose maiden name was Charlotte T. Resinger, was born in Beever county, Pennsylvania, on the 14th of February, 1824, and was married to Mr. Robert Clark in 1850. Mr. Clark was for many years a pilot on the Mississippi river. After their marriage they resided in St. Louis for a couple of years and then moved to Ste. Genevieve and settled on a farm about two miles north of this city.  Mr. and Mrs. Clark remained here for some time and then moved to St. Louis where Mr. Clark died in the year 1866. After the death of her husband, Mrs. Clark returned to her old home in Pennsylvania, and remained there until 1882, when she again moved to Ste. Genevieve and resided here until the time of her death. Mrs. Clark was blessed with three children, Agnes, Laura and Ashley, only one of whom is living, Ashley, a highly respected citizen of our town.

 

The remains were interred in the Lutheran cemetery on Sunday afternoon at four o’clock, Prof. A. J. Sparks officiating.

 

Married.

 

A pleasant affair took place last Tuesday, April 11, 1893. It was the occasion of the marriage of Mr. T. A. Bryan and Miss Mary B. Baumann both of this county. They were joined in the holy bonds of matrimony at the Catholic Church at River aux Vases, Rev. Father Wagner officiating. Misses Louise Pratte and Mary Trautman acted as bridesmaids and Messrs. Lawrence Bauman and James Field as groomsmen. After the ceremony was performed, the party repaired to the residence of the bride’s father where a host of friends were awaiting their arrival. The magnificent dinner which had been prepared cannot be too highly complimented, while other refreshments were plentiful, such as lemonade, wine, beer, etc., ample justice being done on both sides. The day was pleasantly and sociably spent and all who participated enjoyed themselves. On Wednesday Mr. Bryan and his spouse repaired to Mr. Frank Coffman’s residence who is a brother-in-law, at which place he was tendered with a dinner given by Mrs. Coffman in honor of her only brother.  The sumptuous repast set forth by Mrs. Coffman cannot be excelled. I have not words to express the admiration shown to the people by Mrs. Coffman on that day.

 

Mr. Bryan has been engaged for several years in the Public Schools and has proved to be one of the best instructors in the county. On the 4th day of this month (April) he was unanimously chosen School Commissioner of this County.  Mrs. Bryan is the daughter of Xavier Bauman of Bremen, Mo., a well to do farmer who is highly respected by all who have had the pleasure to make his acquaintance. May they live long, a happy and prosperous life is the wish of your correspondent. The following persons were present and enjoyed the excellent dinner:  Mr. Charles Blacklege and wife, Mr. Nick Heberlie and wife, Miss Annie Lorenz of Perry county, Miss Cita Tillman of St. Francois county, Miss Dolly Pratte, Messrs. Joseph and John Pratte, Mr. Mac Coffman, A. C. Chandler and others. ( a list of wedding presents was not transcribed)

 

Fair Play, April 29, 1893

Southeast Missouri.

Mrs. Sophia B. Pipkin, mother of Attorney Merril Pipkin, died at her home at Farmington on April 14th.

 

Dr. Parkhurst, treasurer of St. Francois county, died at his home in Farmington Monday morning of this week.

 

Ste. Genevieve county, originally settled by the French, is now one of the most Germanized counties in the State. The Germans of that county are chiefly Bavarians and they are remarkably industrious and thrifty and taking their circumstances into consideration, quite prosperous. They are mostly Democrats--DeSoto Gazette.

 

Born, on Saturday, April 8, 1893, to the wife of Mr. Joseph Leida of Lawrenceton, twins--a boy and a girl.

 

Mr. John Flynn, a highly respected citizen of Richwoods, Washington county, died at his home last Tuesday evening.

 

Mr. Eli Clifton has been appointed postmaster at Minnith this county, in place of Mr. Housand Kenner, resigned.

 

The trial of Irv. Byington charged with the murder of Henry Pigg at Bonne Terre about two years ags, is occupying the time of the Circuit Court now. The indictment is for murder in the first degree and the jury is composed of the following gentlemen:  Joseph Weiler, John Weiler, Frank Babb, John Hazel, Anton Samson, Jordon Berry, Joseph Seyssler, Anthony Sucher, Joseph Valle, George Vogt, Ed. Boland and Charles Govro.

 

Fair Play, May 6, 1893

Born, on Wednesday, April 26, 1893, to the wife of Prof. D. W. Anthony, teacher of the Ste. Genevieve Colored Public School, a son.

Walter, the fourteen-year-old son of Mr. George Thomure, received a slight stroke of paralysis on Friday of last week but, we are glad to state, has fully recovered.

 

While on their way from Ste. Genevieve to St. Mary’s last Tuesday, Gus Thomure, the livery stable driver of this place, and Mike Kaufman, a drummer for a wholesale whiskey house of St. Louis, had a narrow escape from death by drowning. When near the River aux Vases bridge their team got in water beyond its depth and the occupants of the carriage jumped into the water and swam to a tree, which they clung to until they were rescued by Mr. Lawrence Ruh, who heard their cries for help. The driver returned to Ste. Genevieve and Mr. Kaufman engaged the services of Ruh to take him to St. Mary’s. While there Ruh began drinking, and when he left for home was intoxicated. Wednesday morning the mail carrier reported having seen his team, drowned and floating in a creek known as Kerlagon’s Run, two miles from St. Mary’s. A party repaired to the place and after a short search found the body of Ruh under the wagon in 10 feet of water.  It is supposed he lost his way, and, permitting the team to wander in an aimless way, they fell over the bank and he, being unable to help them or himself, all were drowned. His dog was found standing guard over the spot where his body was found. Coroner Ritledge was summoned and an inquest was held over the remains of the dead man, and a verdict was rendered in accordance with the facts above stated. The remains were brought to Ste. Genevieve and interred in Valle Spring Catholic cemetery Thursday afternoon.

 

Andy Wilder recovered the  goods that were stolen from him at Little Rock landing one night last week. The goods were recovered while the thief was attempting to break into the warehouse at Seventy-Six Landing about four miles above Grand Tower. Andy received a telegram Saturday and went down on the boat that night, returning Sunday with the property. About thirteen shots from a Winchester were fired at the thief, but he escaped to an island and has not since been heard of.

 

Fair Play, May 13, 1893

The telephone between Little Rock and Meyer’s Hotel is in good working order.

 

Born, on Friday, May 5, 1893, to the wife of Mr. Albert Boyer of this city, a daughter.

 

We learn from the St. Louis papers that a marriage license has been issued to W. B. T. St. Gem and Ida Oil of that city.

 

Married, at the residence of the bride’s parents at Minnith, on Tuesday, May 9, 1893, by Rev. Carver, Mr. John Boland and Miss Virginia Rimboch.

 

Mrs. Joseph Bailey died at her home  near Weingarten last Saturday, May 6, and was buried from the Catholic Church at that place on Sunday by Rev. Father A. J. Huttler.

 

The happy marriage of Miss Mary T. Donze, daughter of our Mr. Meinrod Donze, with Mr. George Menk, of St. Louis, of which we made short mention in a former issue, will still be a pleasant memory to our readers. The editor has since then learned that Mr. Menk is one of the most wide-awake and successful business men of the great metropolis of the Mississippi Valley. He is the junior partner of one of the oldest lithographic institutions there, and no business house of this kind stands so high in the estimation of the commercial world of St. Louis, as his. The marriage ceremony was performed at the St. Peter and Paul’s Church in St. Louis on the 25th of April.  We are sure that our fellow citizens will join us in congratulating Miss Donze on her happy marriage and wishing her a long life of happiness and prosperity.

 

Died.

Flynn--At his home in Richwoods, Washington County, Missouri, Tuesday evening, April 25, 1893 after an illness of several months, Mr. John Flynn, aged 49 years, 10 months and 21 days.

 

It is with sincere regret that we chronicle the death of Mr. Flynn. He was the eldest of a family of nine children of the late Michael Flynn, deceased, and a brother of the present Collector of the Revenue of this county, Mr. M. M. Flynn, with whom he has been associated in business for a number of years.

 

John Flynn was born in Washington county, Mo., June 4, 1843, where he resided until the outbreak of the war, when he enlisted in the Third Missouri Cavalry Confederate Army, and after the war returned to his home. In 1865 he engaged in the general merchandise business, which together with the manufacturing of lumber and lead smelting he has since successfully conducted. He was married September 24, 1868, to Miss Harriet Vivian, a native of Jefferson county. To this union there were born eight children, seven of whom, together with his wife, survive him. In religion he was a Catholic. Politically a staunch Democrat. The many friends of Mr. Flynn through-out the county join the Independent in extending their heartfelt sympathy to the bereaved family and relatives of the deceased. He was a good man and one that will be greatly missed.--Potosi Independent.

 

Fair Play, May 20, 1893

Born, on Sunday, May 14, 1893, to the wife of Mr. Charles Rehm of this city, a son.

 

We are informed that Mr. Paul L. Lempke of this city and Mrs. Laura Brooks of Festus were married at the latter place one day this week.

 

The trial of David, Price and Spurgeon Ditch charged with assault with intent to kill, took place at Farmington this week. Price was fined $100 and costs and David and Spurgeon were acquitted.

 

Died.

Died, in this city, of consumption, on Tuesday, May 16, 1893, at six o’clock P. M., Mrs. Felix Govereau, aged fifty-two years. Mrs. Govereau had been a sufferer from that dread disease for many years and her death was not unexpected. She leaves a husband and four children to mourn her loss.  The remains were interred in the Valle Spring Catholic cemetery on Wednesday afternoon at four o’clock, Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout performing the last ceremonies.

 

While returning from a visit last Sunday night about ten o’clock Edward Moser was held up and robbed by three men in the public road just below Quarrytown. The thieves were acquainted with Mr. Moser for they called him by name, asking him for a match. Ed. stopped his horse to comply with their request when a pistol was immediately placed at his head and the robbers searched his clothing, taking everything they could lay their hands on, consisting of over $20 in money, a gold watch and chain, a revolver, a locket, a finger ring and a knife with Mr. Moser’s name on. The highway men had their faces blackened with shoe polish and were not recognized. Mr. Moser has offered a reward of $25 for their capture.

 

Fair Play, May 27, 1893

Kaskaskia’s Liberty Bell.

Chester, Ill., May 18--It has leaked out that the old liberty bell, so long held sacred by the people of Kaskaskia, has been quietly removed at night from the belfry at Kaskaskia and taken to the Columbian Exposition. The older inhabitants were very much opposed to its being removed, and despite the receipt of a heavy bond for its safe keeping and prompt return, there was a disposition among the people not to part with it. The bell was taken away without the knowledge of the objectors, and so well was the work done that but for the sharp eyes of a former resident of Kaskaskia, who saw it on a train here half covered with a barrel, it would have reached its destination and no one the wiser. It is thought the members of the Randolph County Columbian Club, who have been making a collection of Kaskaskia relics, know more about it than any one else, and that they have taken it to the Illinois building at the World’s Fair, where it will occupy the place of honor in the Kaskaskia exhibit. The bell has been in use at Kaskaskia about 200 years, and was the first bell brought from France to this Western country.

 

Born, on Saturday, May 20, 1893, to the wife of Dr. Estes of Bloomsdale, a daughter.

 

Born, on Saturday, May 20, 1893, to the wife of Mr. Joseph Seyssler of this city, a son.

 

Mr. James Brierton, one of Jefferson county’s leading citizens, died at his home at Festus of paralysis on Monday, May 22, 1893.

 

Married, on Tuesday, May 23 1893, at the Catholic Church in this city, Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout officiating, Mr. Charles Brader and Miss Caroline Schmidt, both of Ste. Genevieve.

 

The trial of Wm. Ziegler charged with the killing of two dogs belonging to August Kern took place before Justice Cox at the Court House last Saturday. After hearing the testimony the jury returned a verdict of guilty and assessed the punishment at a fine of $5 and costs. Mr. Ziegler immediately took an appeal to the Circuit Court. Messrs. E. A. Rozier and Peter H. Huck were the attorneys for the plaintiff and defendant respectively.

 

Passed Away.

The news reaches us this morning that Mr. James Brierton, of Festus, died at his home in that city last night. Deceased had been sick for several months but until lately has been able to move about. He was a prominent citizen of Festus, enterprising and energetic and his loss will be greatly felt by a wide circle of friends.

 

He was born in county Meath, Ireland, December 18, 1837. He came to America in 1857, stopping in Rome, N. Y., and the following year located in Iowa City, Iowa. Two years later he came to Missouri, settling at Irondale, Washington county, where he entered the employ of John G. Scott and Co., as a laborer. With this company he remained and by earnest application rose to be general manager. In 1879 he went to Leadville Colo., as general manager of the Harrison Reduction Works. In 1881, owing to failing health, he returned to Missouri, filling the position of assistant superintendent for the Iron Mountain Co., until 1884, when he came to Festus and engaged in merchandising. A year ago he sold out his interest and latterly has been contracting for the Crystal Plate Glass Co. The funeral will be held at the Catholic church. Festus, tomorrow, after which the remains will be brought to this on the mail train for interment in the Catholic cemetry.  DeSoto Press.

 

The marriage of Mr. Anthony Bock and Miss Mary Herzog was celebrated at the home of the bride’s parents in this city on Wednesday evening at 6:30 o’clock by Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout in the presence of the relatives and a number of invited friends. Miss Annie Herzog, sister of the bride, was bridesmaid and Mr. Bart. Eichenlaub acted as groomsman. Immediately after the marriage ceremony a sumptuous supper was served, after which the wedding party enjoyed themselves by dancing, etc., until the early hours of morn.  The bride is the daughter of Mr. Leon Herzog of this city and the groom has a position as pastry cook on the steamer Belle of Memphis. The newly wedded pair departed for St. Louis Thursday where they will make their future home.

Died, in this city on Tuesday evening, May 23, 1893, of pneumonia, Mrs. Harriet Lalumondiere, at the age of 62 years, 2 months and 19 days. Mrs. Lalumondiere had been in ill health for a number of years. Her maiden name was Thomure and she was married to Mr. Charles Lalumondiere in the year 1869, who died in this city in 1881. Before her death Mrs. Lalumondiere received the last sacraments of the Catholic Church and was buried in the Valle Spring cemetery by Rev. Father Weiss on Thursday morning at nine o’clock. R. I. P.

 

Fair Play, June 3, 1893

Born, on Tuesday, May 29, 1893, to the wife of Mrs. Christian Baum of this city, a son.

 

Mr. L. E. Reeve bought the house and lot of Mrs. Sophie Johnson on the Plank Road last week for $175.

 

A sad and fatal accident happened to the infant daughter of Mr. David Huber, who lives on the Plankroad near Weingarten, on Monday of this week. The child was playing with a dog which was chained to a fence in the yard when the chain, by some means or other, became entangled around the little girl’s neck and the dog in jumping around pulled the chain in such a manner that the child was choked to death before assistance could arrive.

 

Married.

Mr. John Thurman, one of Ste. Genevieve county’s most popular young farmers, and Miss Annie C. Reeder, were married May 18, 1893, at the residence of the brides parents. At 10:30 A. M., the bride, dressed in a cream-colored silk, and the groom attired in a handsome suit of broadcloth, entered the room, attended by G. W. Hinkle and Miss Maggie Mackley as groomsman and bridesmaid. To make the occasion more pleasant a large number of relatives and friends were present and extended their most hearty congratulations to the groom and bride; and we are pleased to see the young couple happily started on their voyage through life, and as the grand old vessel of matrimony, with sails spread and banner flying, pushes out from the shore, we watch her glide over the smooth waters and heartily wish, “May God bring the good ship safe to land.”

 

Ulam News.

Born, to the wife of C. C. Hand May 19, 1893, a boy.

 

Fair Play, June 10, 1893

Born, on Saturday, June 3, 1893, to the wife of Mr. William Bell of this city, a daughter.

 

Born, on Monday, June 5, 1893, to the wife of Charles Coffman (colored) of this city, a daughter.

 

From the St. Louis papers of the 7th inst. we learn that a marriage license has been issued to Mr. Archie Pitman and Miss Belle Kline of St. Francois county.

 

The family of Mr. Valentine Seitz received a new paino from St. Louis this week.

 

Fair Play, June 17, 1893

Kinsey News.

The Guethle boys took their steam threshing outfit home last Saturday which they recently purchased of Mr. Adam Buenniger to repair it up for the coming season.

 

Henry T. Carron, who was to have started a blacksmithing business at Flucom on the Bonne Terre Railroad has abandoned the idea, and will remain at home.

 

Mrs. Louise Waller, wife of William Waller is no better and is growing weaker from day to day. Nothing seems to do her any good, in the way of relief, and her recovery is considered doubtful.

 

Born, on Friday, June 2, 1893, to the wife of Mr. Walter Schaaf of St. Mary’s, a son.

 

Born, on Thursday, June 8, 1893, to the wife of Mr. Daniel Loida of Lawrenceton, a son.

 

Frank Scheuring, the St. Mary undertaker, came to Ste. Genevieve this week to embalm the bodies of Mrs. G. W. St. Gem and Mrs. Eliza Skewes.

 

Mr. F. A. Roy, father-in-law of the Gazette editor, celebrated his 76th birthday on Monday last surrounded by his children and six grand children at a dinner prepared in order of the occasion.--DeSoto Gazette.

 

Adam Schwartz and Joseph Williams were tried at Coffman last Saturday for the killing of dogs belonging to F. M. Womack and Nich. Thomure, and fined $1.00 and costs. The State was represented by Prosecuting Attorney Huck.

 

Gov. W. J. Stone, on last Monday commissioned Miss Frances E. Flynn as a notary public for Richwoods township. Miss Flynn, while in Potosi on last Monday, qualified, and she now has the honor of being the only lady notary in this part of the State. Potosi Independent.

 

Died, at his home at Zell on Saturday, June 10, 1893, Mr. Frank Herzog, aged 76 years and 8 months. The remains were interred on Monday.

 

Died, of dropsy, Thursday, June 15, 1893, Maude Genevieve, beloved daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Columbus Abernathy, aged five years, seven months and eight days. The remains were interred in the Valle Spring Catholic cemetery on Friday morning by Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout. The grief stricken parents have the sympathy of the entire community in their sad bereavement.

 

Died.

Died--Gone to rest at her home in Ste. Genevieve, Mrs. Elizabeth St. Gem, beloved wife of Gustavus St. Gem, on Sunday morning, June 11th, 1893, in the 61st year of her age.

 

Mrs. St. Gem was the daughter of William Skewes and Eliza Skewes, and was born at Valle’s Mines in Jefferson County, Missouri, on the 5th day of May, 1833, from whence the family removed to Ste. Genevieve, where at the convent located there, Mrs. St. Gem received the benefits of a good education, which was developed by a judicious course of reading.

 

On November 16th, 1853, she was married to Gustavus St. Gem, and this couple for nearly forty years continued to reside at and near the old City of Ste. Genevieve, blessed in the enjoyment of a happy home; until grim visaged death laid its pall and blight upon what was once bright and joyful. This union was blessed with three children, Stephen, the oldest, having long since been called from this vale of sorrow and tears, Mary, the oldest daughter, was married to Augustus Ebert of New York City, but has for some time been residing in Ste. Genevieve, mourning the sad and untimely death of her much beloved husband; while Gustavus W. St. Gem, the remaining son is now engaged in business in St. Louis.

 

Her death, peculiarly sad and unfortunate, not only from the cares and sorrows that follow in its train, but coupled with the death of her aged and loved mother (whose obituary will be found in another part of this paper) who could only survive the hearing of the sad news of her daughter’s death but a few hours, leaves a void in a large circle of loving relatives and devoted friends that time’s tempering hand will take years to fill.( the lengthy editorial on her death was not transcribed)

 

Died--Gathered to her rest when the sun of her life was far down in the west, Mrs. Eliza Skewes, relict of William Skewes, at her home in Ste. Genevieve, Missouri, on Tuesday, June 13th, 1893, in the 90th year of her age.

 

The subject of this sketch was born in Camburne, Cornwall, England, on the 29th day of April , 1804, and was married to William Skewes in Camburne in the year 1831 and almost immediately emigrated to this country.  Coming to St. Louis on their way to the mining regions of Illinois at Galena, they learned that the Black Hawk war was then at its height; they therefore concluded to locate at Valle’s Mines, where Mr. Skewes was employed as superintendent. He continued in the lead mining business for some years and was largely instrumental in the development of the lead mines of Jefferson, St. Francois, Washington and Franklin counties; and by reason of his great ability in the management and development of these mines, he soon became recognized as the leading expert in the State.

 

This worthy couple having acquired a competence in the mining business, removed to the quiet of a farm near the city of Ste. Genevieve and afterwards moved in the city itself, residing in great peace and harmony until death removed the partner of her sorrows and joys in 1869. She continued to reside with members of her family, until death removed her from the loving care of her many relatives and friends.

 

Mrs. Skewes came of well respected parentage, her maiden name being Eliza Hancock, and she being related to the celebrated John Hancock, the president of our Declaration of Independence, where his large bold signature has always arrested the attention of readers of that memorable document. Her father was employed on the crew of the ship Bellerophon at the time when Napoleon the Great surrendered to the forces of England.

She was a woman of marked intelligence and her recollection of current and past events was marvelous; and up to her very last breath she was an authority upon all matters coming within her experience. (a lengthy editorial was not transcribed)

 

She leaves surviving her only one child, her daughter, Lavinia M. Rozier, who has been living with her for so many years, and who has done so much to make pleasant and agreeable her final years upon this earth. One son Stephen Skewes having departed this life September 30th, 1845; a daughter, Louisa Skewes, at the age of twenty, passing away Nov. 21st, 1862, and her son William V. Skewes, who was well known to the people of this city having gone to his rest May 17th, 1889, and the remaining child, Mrs. St. Gem, having preceded her mother by only two days.

 

She leaves quite a number of grandchildren and great-grandchildren to mourn her loss, and yet to be comforted and consoled by her example of a true and pure life, and of many sufferings long and patiently endured. May her soul Rest in Peace.

 

Fair Play, June 24, 1893

May Bliss Be Theirs.

The marriage of Miss Jessie Menard to Dr. Will H. Leavenworth of Cripple Creek, Colorado, at the residence of Mr. O. D. Harris, 918 Garrison Avenue, St. Louis, on the evening of June 19th, 1893, was the occasion of a small but very harmonious gathering consisting of the near relatives and friends of the happy pair.

 

The news of the marriage cannot gail to be of intense interest to all Ste. Genevieve people as both parties claim the good old town as their birthplace, although of recent years the bride has made St. Louis her home, while the groom, taking to heart the immortal words of Horace Greeley, has gone West and grown up with the country and has also built up for himself a very fine practice, and now returns after the lapse of some six years to claim the girl he left behind him.

 

The bride, a petit brunette, looked very charming in an exceedingly stylish traveling costume of dark blue serge, tailor made and exquisitely fitting. The groom, of course, looked supremely proud and happy in the prospect of speedily becoming somebody’s own sweet Will.

 

After the ceremony, which was performed by the Reverent Father Walsh of St. Bridget’s church, the usual kissing and congratulations followed, and Dr. and Mrs. Leavenworth took their departure en route for Colorado, amid showers of rice, the carriage driving off with the little god of love inside and an ancient slipper roosting placidly on the top, where it had been fired by the unerring hand of a zealous well wisher and believer of omens.

 

There were present on the occasion Mr. Auguste Menard, brother to the bride, Mrs. S. E. St. James, Mr. and Mrs. J. Herbert Boughan, Mr. and Mrs. O. D. Harris, Mr. and Mrs. Felix Janis, Mrs. Aurore Janis, Mr. and Mrs. J. Ziegler, Misses Mary and Memie Janis,  Messrs. Percy and Henry Janis, Misses Emma and Libby LeCompte and Mr. Edgar Rozier.

 

Born, on Tuesday, June 20th, to the wife of Mr. Joseph Bogy of St. Louis, a son.

 

We are in receipt of an issue of the Aurora Times, published at Aurora, Ill., by Mr. Valle Harold, who formerly published the Fair Play. We have placed the Times on our exchange list and wish Mr. Harold success in this new enterprise.

 

The old bridge over the North Gabouerie creek on the 4th street was torn down this week and work commenced on the new bridge. According to the contract this bridge has to be completely by the first of July.

 

Prosecuting Attorney Huck and Mr. E. A. Rozier went to Bloomsdale yesterday to attend the trial of Bockenkamp vs. Weber. Weber is charged with maliciously wounding a cow belonging to Mr. Bockenkamp.

 

Fair Play, July 1, 1893

The iron for the new bridge over the South Gabourie was shipped here on the New Idlewild last Monday night but is still at Little Rock landing as the men employed to build the bridge have not yet arrived. According to the contract the bridge was to be completed today.

 

Born, on Thursday, June 29, 1893, to the wife of Mr. George Crane of this city, twins--a boy and a girl.

 

Mr. C. Motzel was tried before a jury in ‘Squire Cox’s court last Saturday, for poisoning chickens belonging to Mr. Alex Fontan, and fined $5.

 

Henry Weber was tried at Bloomsdale last Friday for maliciously wounding a cow belonging to Herman Bockenkamp and fined $5 and costs.

 

Mr. Amadee Boyer last week completed a neat job at the old City Graveyard, polishing the tomb stone on the grave of Mr. John D. Scott and placing curbing around the lot.

 

A Pioneer Gone.

Herman Brands, father of Senator A. L. Brands, passed away to the great beyond at his home at Clardy, Mo., recently. His remains were laid to rest at the family cemetery at Concord. Mr. Brands was born in Wesphalia, Germany in the year 1800. After reaching manhood he served 7 years with distinction in the German army, under the immediate command of Prince Albert, late Consort of Queen Victoria of Great Britian.  In 1844, he emigrated to what as then the wilds of America, enduring all the privations and hardships of those times, with a determination to succeed in life, saving enough out of his meager wages of $8 per month to finally locate and cultivate a farm, on which he since resided, gradually but his thrift adding more to his earthly possessions. In 1855 Mr. Brands was united to Miss Amaline Wells who survives him. Their union was blessed with three boys all of who lived to reach manhoods estate, A. L. Brands, State Senator of this district, Franklin W. and Peter H. Brands, both of whom  have died within the last 4 years. Herman Brands was always a great believer in one of lifes greatest boons, education, and often endured hardships that his children might enjoy the benefit of a good schooling. He leaves a wide range of friends and acquaintances to mourn his demise and treasure his memory. Red Bud Democrat.

 

Colonel Sam Stanton of Ste. Genevieve, who has been given a place under Surveyor Dalton, is an original character. “Sam” served with distinction in the Confederate army, and he delights to recount how he took an old white mare with a bell attached to her neck and rode into a carrol of Federal mules and when he rode out again 150 followed the old white mare into the Confederate lines.

 

“Sam” was elected Doorkeeper by the State Senate last January, and for once he in his lifetime he threw off his carelessly worn flannel shirt and donned a starched linen bosom. He stood it for one day, and then he discarded the uncomfortable linen and returned to his soft flannel, with the remark: “No true Missourian to the manor born can wear a starched shirt. If the dude Senators from St. Louis don’t like my style why, they can resign.”--St. Louis Chronicle.

 

Quite a lively scene was created on Main street Tuesday forenoon by a runaway team belonging to Mr. Andrew Siebert of New Bremen. The horses started from Henry Siebert’s saloon, crossed the bridge safely at full speed and, being crowded off the street by other teams in front of Jokerst Bros’ store, dashed on to the sidewalk at Gottlieb Rehm’s saloon where they only succeeded in smashing an empty beer bottle.

 

At Weiler and Steigle’s harness shop, next door, they came in full tilt against the end post that supports the wooden awning, one on each side of the post, and with a crash the heavy post was torn forcibly from its fastenings and leveled to the ground. One of the horses broke loose from the harness but was soon caught. No other damage was done but considerable excitement was caused by the unusual occurrence.

 

Probate Judge Koehler was kept pretty busy the first part of this week acting as Judge in the trial of Mrs. Susan Young vs. the estate of James Porter, deceased. Mrs. Young sued the estate to collect payment of a note of $500 with interest for several years, amounting in all to over $1,200. The case was hotly contested on both sides and the arguments lasted over five hours. Lawyers Young of Farmington and E. A. Rozier of this city represented the plaintiff and M. R. Smith of Farmington and Prosecuting Attorney Huck were the attorneys for the defendant. After remaining out twenty minutes the jury returned a verdict in favor of the defendant. We understand that an appeal has been taken to the Circuit Court.

 

Joseph Flynn, well known here as former editor of the Fair Play and as principal of the Parochial High School for boys, was here on Monday and Tuesday of this week. Mr. Flynn now edits the Southeast Gazette, a Democratic paper published in DeSoto, Jefferson county on the line of the Iron Mountain railroad, 42 miles south of St. Louis.  He is also City Attorney of DeSoto, an office to which he was elected in April 1891 and 1892.

 

Fair Play, July 8, 1893

Born, on Sunday, July 2, 1893, to the wife of Mr. Fred. Bolle of this city, a daughter.

 

Ulam News.

Born, on Monday, June 26, 1893, to the wife of Mr. Charles Perry of this place, a girl.

 

Mrs. Bridget Frazer died at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. Ellen Hutson, on Tuesday, June 27, 1893. Her remains were laid to rest in the Catholic Cemetery at Silver Lake, Perry County, Mo.

 

During a fight at St. Mary’s on the night of the 4th, Richard Irving was cut and dangerously wounded by a knife in the hands of William Welch. From what we can learn the cutting was done in self defense and no arrests have been made. At last accounts Irving was on a fair road to recovery.

 

The men employed to erect the new iron bridge over the South Gabouri creek on Fourth St. arrived here last Saturday night and are now at work on the bridge. They expect to finish the job next week and will do so if possible as the company forfeits $10 a day since the 1st of July, the time when the bridge, according to the contract, was to be completed.

 

Miss Cora Williams of Bloomsdale, who has been working at the County Farm for some time past, accidently swallowed a pin Wednesday morning. The pin lodged in her throat and she was taken to St. Louis Thursday afternoon to have the pin removed.

 

Mr. Franklin Difani, who lives near St. Marys met with a serious accident while cutting hay last Wednesday. The team became frightened and ran away, throwing Mr. Difani off of the reaper and cutting his leg in such a manner that it is thought the limb will have to be amputated.

 

 

Fair Play, July 15, 1893

Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Berry’s little girl had the misfortune to fall and break her arm while playing in the yard last Saturday.

 

Born, on Friday, July 7, 1893, to the wife of Mr. Felix Sexauer of this city, twins, a boy and girl. The boy died shortly after he was born.

 

Mr. Henry T. Burns, who recently resigned his office of county clerk of Perry county to accept a position under Surveyor Dalton, was married in St. Louis last Monday to Miss Barbara Maisel.

 

Margery, the six year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William H. Conner of Prairie du Rocher died at the home of her parents in that city last Saturday night, July 8th, at eleven o’clock. The little child had been suffering for some time with a spinal disease and her death was not unexpected. The remains were interred in the Prairie du Rocher Catholic cemetery on Monday morning at ten o’clock after a funeral high mass had been sung for the repose of her soul by Rev. Father Krewett. Mr. John L. Boverie and wife, Mrs. Mary Janis and Mrs. E. A and Henry L. Rozier of this city attended the funeral.

 

 

Fair Play, July 22, 1893

Gus. Valroy of Perryville killed a black snake last week which measured 9 feet, 6 1/2 inches in length.

 

A daughter was born to Mrs. Emile C. Lelie of this city on Wednesday, July 19th.

 

Born, on Monday, July 17, 1893, to the wife of Mr. Peter Wehner of this city, twins--both girls.

 

Born, on Monday, July 17, 1893, to the wife of Mr. Joseph C. Ziegler of 918 Garrison Avenue, St. Louis, Mo., a son weighing ten pounds.

 

A party composed of Mrs. Harding, Miss Lottie Bryan and Miss Emily Wilder, accompanied by Messrs. O. L. Bryan, Ed. J. Rozier, and Jules Petrequin visited the penitentiary at Chester, Ill, last Monday.

 

We are in receipt of a postal card from Rev. Father A. J. Huttler dated July 6th. Since his departure Father Huttler has visited the principal cities of this country and Europe and will return to America about the 11th of September.

 

On Saturday last, 15th inst., at a picnic given near John May’s in Perry county, a general row occured in which George Scott, Jr., son of William Scott, who lives on the Saline creek in this county, was shot twice through the body and arm by John Obuchon, son of Louis Obuchon, a well known farmer of this county and postmaster at Ulam. Mr. Scott is said to be in critical condition. Sheriff Anderson of Perry county was present and arrested Mr. Obuchon at once and took him to the jail at Perryville. Charles Obuchon, a brother of the one who did the shooting, was beaten insensible by Isaac Lintz during the row.

 

Obituary.

 

Departed this life July 3rd, 1893 James O. Wallace, who resided in Ste. Genevieve county, two miles northeast of Libertyville.

 

Bro. Wallace was born in North Carolina June 14th, 1822. Came to Missouri when 18 years of age, and was married to Selina Welker at the age of 25. Our deceased brother has been a consistent member of the M. E. Church, South, for more than ten years.

 

He was a many who never talked about his neighbors, and consequently hadn’t an enemy in the world. Only a few days before his death he expressed himself as being prepared to enter into the duties of a new life. He has also been a faithful member of the Masonic fraternity for more than twenty years, having taken membership in St. Francois Lodge No. 234.

 

Mr. Wallace lived to the age of three score and ten. His death was caused from an attack of la grippe which he had nearly two years ago, and though he has been confined to his bed for several months he has suffered but little, comparatively speaking. The wife and children extend their thanks to the neighbors and friends for the hospitality shown them in this their sad hour of distress.

 

Resinger--Edward Resinger was born in Farmington, Mo., November 24, 1837, and died in Ste. Genevieve county, Mo., July 3, 1893, aged 55 years, 7 months and 9 days.

Mr. Resinger was twice married, the first time in 1863 to Miss Louisa Randolph, the last time to her sister, Miss Elizabeth Randolph, who with their three sons and one son by his former marriage live to mourn him. Bro. Resinger professed religion about 14 years ago at Chestnut Ridge near his home. During these years he lived a Christian life, having in the latter part of them done much for the cause of Christ, being one of the most faithful workers in building our new Methodist church near his home. Often have I heard him say that “I do not expect to live long to enjoy it, but I hope it will prove a blessing to this community.”  He had been sinking for nearly two years with the dread disease consumption, during which time he suffered a great deal, but without murmuring. His trust in the Savior’s promises was more fully developed during his illness. (editorial not transcribed).

 

 

Fair Play, July 29, 1893

Prosecuting Attorney Huck went to Bloomsdale last Saturday to attend the trial of Charles Fritch, charged with disturbing a religious assembly at Lawrenceton. Fritch plead guilty before ‘Squire Boyer and was fined $6 and costs.

 

Mr. Henry Samson died in this city last Saturday morning, July 22, 1893, of paralysis at the age of forty seven years.  Mr. Samson received a stroke of paralysis about three years ago from which he never fully recovered. Saturday morning he received a second stroke and died in about three hours. The remains were interred in the Valle Spring Catholic cemetery Sunday morning at eight o’clock, Rev. Father Weiss officiating.

 

Minnith News.

Elias Boland has moved back from Crystal City and purchased a farm from W. Scott.

 

J. W. Boland and family, who formerly resided in the Cotton Woods have moved to Minnith.

 

J. N. Voelker, son of Ferdinand Voelker of this place, was married at Bertrand, Mo., on the 13th inst. to Miss Maggie Davis. After the ceremony they took passage on the train to Fredericktown where Mr. Ferd Voelker met them and brought them to his home at this place. A fine wedding supper was then served and the happy young couple received several handsome gifts. After a short stay they returned to their home in Bertrand.

 

 

Fair Play,  August 5, 1893

Died, in St. Louis on Friday, July 28, 1893, at 9:45 P. M., after a lingering illness, Mr. Jules A. Detchmendy, aged 73 years, 4 months and 20 days. The funeral took place Sunday, July 30, from St. Michael’s Church. The deceased was an uncle of Mrs. C. Boverie and Mrs. Emily Boyce of this city.

 

John Randals and Odile Lajois (both colored) were married in this city on Wednesday, August 2, by Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout.

 

Married, in this city on Tuesday, August 1, 1893, by Probate Judge Koehler, Mr. William Hendrix and Miss Emma Cook, both of Jackson township, this county.

 

Mrs. Elizabeth Motzel, wife of Mr. Cornelius Motzel of this city, died in St. Louis on Saturday, July 22, 1893, of typhoid fever at the age of sixty four years. The remains were interred on Monday, July 24, after a mass had been sung for the repose of the soul at Sts. Peter and Paul’s Church.

 

Minnith News.

George Scott who was shot in the breast by John Obuchon at a picnic near John May’s in Perry count is recovering.

 

Fair Play,  August 12, 1893

Fritz Ehler had his hand badly mashed in the machinery at the Cone Mills last Monday.

 

Mr. Louis J. Boyer sold his house and lot in Festus this week to John Ellis of Illinois for the sum of $850.

 

Mr. Leon Hermann has received the plan and will begin the erection of his new house on Washington street next week.

 

Mr. Frank Oberle this week purchased the house and lot of Mr. Charles Weiss, about half a mile west of Ste. Genevieve for the sum of $2,000.

 

Married at the Southern Hotel in this city on Monday, August 7, 1893, by Probate Judge Hermann Koehler, Mr. Andrew Jackson Smith of Libertyville and Mrs. Mary L. Walker of Ste. Genevieve.

 

Died.

Died, at the county farm near Ste. Genevieve, on June 24, 1893, Mr. Charles Beyries, aged 23 years, 8 months and 8 days. The deceased had been ill with epileptic fits for over fourteen years. He was the son of George and Catharine Beyries, but at the age of 8 months was adopted by his grandfather, Joseph Jarrette and his aunt, Mary Louise Jarrette, who nursed him tenderly through life and only parted from their loved one when forced to do so by his terrible illness.  The remains were conveyed to River aux Vases and buried at the Catholic cemetery at that place on Monday, June 26th. May he rest in peace.

 

A marriage license was issued this week to Mr. George Grieshaber and Miss Mary Goss, both of this city.

 

Married, on Monday, August 7, 1893, by Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout, Miss Frances Burgert and Mr. Paul Abt, both of Ste. Genevieve.

 

Found in a Bottle.

Pilot Joe MCullough, of the steamer Belle Memphis, is in possession of a document from Samuel A. Wilson, the lone train robber, which owing to the peculiar means that he took to present it to the public, is somewhat a curiosity. The document, inclosed in a bottle, was picked up in the Mississippi River at Mudd’s Landing, opposite this place, a few weeks ago by Harvey Miller, landing keeper. It is written on a half sheet of unruled letter paper, considerably crumpled, and has the appearance of having been written under difficulties. There is nothing in the note to show at what point it was consigned to the waters, but it is supposed to have been thrown into the Mississippi River from the Missouri Pacific train which carried the robber to the Penitentiary. It reads as follows:  Missouri Pacific train No. 5, July 3, ‘93. To kindly disposed Friends I have been sentenced to serve a term of 15 years in the Penitentiary and am on my way to Jefferson City, Mo., this a. m. and write this note. I send the same in a bottle. Whoever may find it will please speak a good word for me; also lend me a helping hand towards me receiving a pardon and same will be highly appreciated by Yours truly, Sam. A. Wilson, The Lone Train Robber.

 

Ulam News.

Miss Lizzie Evans, the famous chicken raiser of this settlement, claims to have lost nearly a hundred chickens in a period of about two weeks. Miss Lizzie has been somewhat at a loss to determine as to how her chickens could have so mysteriously disappeared, but finally charged up the vermin with her losses.

 

Fair Play,  August 19, 1893

Mr. John B. Davis, editor of the Perryville Sun and Prosecuting Attorney of Perry county, died at his home in Perryville last Friday morning after a brief illness. Mr. Davis was a bright young man of exemplary habits with a bright future ahead of him, and his death is to be greatly deplored. The remains were interred at St. Mary’s Sunday morning.

 

Born, on Friday, August 18 1893, to the wife of Mr. Joseph Valle of Ste. Genevieve, a daughter.

 

Mr. Becqueret this week purchased the Bogy homestead near St. Mary from Mr. George Bond for $2.700.

 

Married, at Farmington on Saturday, August 12, 1893, Mr. George Grieshaber and Miss Mary Goss, both of this city.

 

Mr. Ferdinand J. Boyer, a son of Mr. Jacob L. Boyer, a former resident of Bloomsdale, died at his home in St. Louis on Friday, August 11, 1893, of typhoid fever, at the age of twenty-six years.

 

Adolph Okenfuss, Willie Naumann and Ed. Baumann made a trip to Chester last Sunday on their bicycles. They left here early in the morning and reached Chester in three hours. While there they met a couple of young men from St. Louis--C. Malone and W. H. Hitchings--who traveled on their bicycles form that place to Chester, a distance of seventy-nine and one-half miles, in nine hours, stopping over at Marissa for the night. Our boys were well pleased with their trip and the treatment they received while at Chester, and intend to make it again in the near future.

 

Dr. Drury of Bloomsdale was tried before a jury in the Probate Court last Saturday and declared insane. Sheriff Biel departed for Fulton last Tuesday to convey him to the insane asylum at that place.

 

Fair Play,  August 26, 1893

It is rumored in town that Sheriff Biel and Mr. Jules Petrequin are making arrangements to rent the Southern Hotel.

 

Marriage licenses were issued this week to Joseph W. Bader of Ste. Genevieve and Miss Lena Delles of Beauvais township, and to Charles H. Roth and Miss Lizzie Gettinger, both of Ste. Genevieve.

 

Died, at his residence in this city on Thursday, August 24, 1893, at 3:30 o’clock P. M., of consumption, Mr. George Will, aged sixty-one years, four months and 24 days. The remains were interred in the Valle Spring cemetery on Friday afternoon at four o’clock.

 

Married, on Monday, August 21, 1893, at the Catholic Church in this city, by Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout, Mr. Edward F. Moser and Miss Clara Roth, both of this city. The wedding supper was given at the residence of the bride’s mother on Monday evening, to which quite a number of friends were invited. Dancing was kept until day light.

 

Mrs. E. Kern’s new house on Merchant Street was completed this week and, with its iron front and plate glass windows, is the most attractive house in Ste. Genevieve and reflects much credit on Geiler Bros., the contractors. Messrs. Joseph N. Simon and Simon DuRocher had the contract for the painting of the building. Mrs. Kern, we understand, will move into her new house next Tuesday.

 

Fair Play,  September 2, 1893

Born, on Friday, August 25th, 1893, to the wife of Mr. Peter Geiler of this city, a daughter.

 

Adam Buenniger was arrested last Thursday charged with obtaining money under false pretenses and in default of $300 bail was placed in jail.

 

The house and lot of Joseph T. Johnson, deceased, was sold at trustee’s sale last Saturday and purchased by Prof. D. W. Anthony for the sum of $215.

 

Eli Aubuchon, a twelve-year old boy of Union township was tried before ‘Squire Pinkston last Thursday and convicted of disturbing the peace of Mrs. Mary Buckholtz and sentenced to thirty days in jail.

 

Cards are out announcing the coming marriage of Dr. John C. Falk and Miss Rosa M. Pleus, which will take place at St. Bridget’s Church, St. Louis, on Wednesday, September 6th, at three o’clock. P. M.

 

Died, at his home in this city on Friday, August 25, 1893, at five o’clock P. M., Titus LeGrand (colored), aged about seventy years. The remains were interred in the Valle Spring Catholic cemetery on Sunday, August 27th, at eleven o’clock A. M., Father C. L. van Tourenhout performing the last ceremonies.

 

Last Wednesday night about eleven o’clock a barn on Market street, the property of Mrs. Peterson, was discovered to be on fire and before assistance could arrive the barn and its contents were a mass of flames. Ashley Clark lost a valuable horse, two sets of double harness, two sets of single harness and a farm wagon, all of which were in the stable at the time of the fire, and Joseph Huck had over two hundred bushels of wheat in the barn which was also destroyed.

The fire was started by a drunken tramp who had lodged in the barn for the night and, it is thought, set it on fire while smoking his pipe. Messrs. Clark, and Hauck’s combined loss will amount to over $300 and City Marshal Berry and Nich. Jokerst have kindly consented to circulate a petition for their benefit, which we have no doubt will be liberally signed by our people as both Mr. Clark and Mr. Hauck are deserving citizens of Ste. Genevieve and the loss falls heavily on them.

 

Last Tuesday night Mr. Paul L. Lempke was called to St. Mary’s by Chief Engineer Brooks to assist in surveying a railroad over the Chester & Iron Mountain Dump to Farmington. From there the road will be continued to the I. M. R. R., also one or more lines will be run into the Flat River country. So the railroad is not dead by any means.

 

Mr. T. P. Boyer of Bloomsdale sold his farm last week to Mr. Andrew Grass, and called at our office Wednesday to have bills printed for a public sale to be held at his place on Saturday, September 16th. After the sale Mr. Boyer intends to move to St. Louis and embark in the insurance business.

 

Fair Play,  September 9, 1893

Born, on Saturday, September 2, 1893, to the wife of Mr. Joseph Grieshaber of this city, a daughter.

 

Died, on Wednesday, September 6, 1893, the infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Papin of this city.

 

Mr. William Thomure, formerly of this city, and Miss Sophia Meyers of St. Louis were married at the latter place on Wednesday of this week.

 

Felix Beard and William Boland will sell their personal property at public sale at the Beard place, four miles South of Ste. Genevieve, on Thursday, September 14th.

 

Married, in this city on Tuesday September 5, 1893, by Probate Judge Koehler, Mr. Felix Labruyere and Miss Lucila Brown, both of Beauvais township, this county.

 

The following account of the death of Mr. Geo. Hardy, who is well known in Ste. Genevieve, is taken from the Globe Democrat:George D. Hardy, a well-known glassworker and son of Capt. Albert Hardy, died at midnight Tuesday, of Bright’s disease. He was 38 years old and a leader in the Glassworker’s Association. The funeral will take place at 2 o’clock this afternoon under the auspices of the Glassworker’s Association, from the family residence, 1027 East Third street.”

 

Ste. Genevieve was in utter darkness the early part of Thursday night and would have remained so had not Marshal Berry taken it upon himself to light the street lamps. It was an amusing sight to see the marshal go from lamp to lamp and, with the assistance of Ashley Clark, who acted in the capacity of a step-ladder, light the different lamps. At present Ste. Genevieve is over run with tramps and its street lamps should be kept burning during the dark hours of night.

 

The farmers and landowners of Kaskaskia point have started a movement to build a levee along the west bank of the Kaskaskia river for the purpose of protecting their lands and their crops from overflow, and they are now arranging for a meeting to be held soon for the purpose of discussing the matter and perfecting an organization. This is a matter in which people living over there are greatly interested, and they consider the present a most favorable time to push the work.  Every person who owns land over there should give the movement his encouragement and assistance.-- Clarion.

 

The marriage of Dr. Jno. C. Falk and Miss Rosa Pleus took place in St. Louis last Wednesday, September 6th. We take the following from one of the St. Louis papers:

At 3 o’clock Wednesday afternoon Miss Rosa M. Pleus, daughter of the late Theodore Pleus, was married to Dr. John C. Falk at St. Bridget’s Church, the Rev. Father Walsh officiating. It was a rose wedding, in honor of the bride’s name, and the attendants were: Miss Anna Falk, of Ste. Genevieve, Mo., bridesmaid; Mr. Theodore Pleus, groomsman, and Messrs. G. A. Pleus, George Jokerst and Charles Raaf, ushers. The bride entered the church with her uncle, Mr. Charles Eber, and the  groom with his mother, Mrs. J. Falk, of Ste. Genevieve. The bride’s gown was of white faille, made in the Empire style, with bertha of lace. She wore a wreath of white roses and maiden hair ferns, and carried a bouquet of the same. The bridesmaid wore white dotted Swiss muslin, made in Empire stye, with bouquet of tea roses. A small reception was held at the future residence of the bridal couple, 2702 Stoddard street, from 4 to 6 o’clock. The happy couple took the evening train for Chicago and the East, and will not be at home until after October 15th.

 

Mr. George Thomure and wife of this city departed for St. Louis Sunday to attend the marriage of their son Will to Miss Sophie Meyers which took place on Wednesday, 6th inst.

 

Among those who departed for the World’s Fair last Sunday, we noticed the following: Dr. M. Andre and wife, Misses Annie Bernays and Emily Wilder, Prosecuting Attorney Huck, John Koetting and Anton Hunold.

 

Dr. C. J. Hertich and family departed for Richwoods last Monday to be present at the marriage of Mr. William Murray of St. Louis and Miss Mamie Flynn of Richwoods which event took place on Wednesday of this week.

 

Fair Play,  September 16, 1893

The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Jules LaChance died at Prairie du Rocher, Ill, on Tuesday of this week.

 

Mr. Joseph M. Bader and Miss Lena Dallas were married at the Catholic Church in this by Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout on Tuesday, September 12th.

 

Marriage licenses were issued this week to Henry Bittick and Adele Primo of Jackson township, and Dolor Billy and Philomene Carron, also of Jackson township.

 

Mr. John Kluck, a cousin of Mr. Chauncey Williamson of Bloomsdale, died at East Bonne Terre on Thursday, September 7th. The remains were interred at Concord in this county.

 

Married, at the Catholic Church in this city on Tuesday, September 12, 1893, by Rev. C. L. van Tourenhout, Mr. Charles H. Roth and Miss Lizzie A. Gettinger, both of Ste. Genevieve.

 

Married, at St. Stephen’s Church, Richwoods, Mo., by Rev. P Gross on Wednesday September 6, 1893, Mr. William Murray and Miss Mamie Flynn, eldest daughter of the late John Flynn. The bride and groom were attended by Mr. Frank X. Connolly of Potosi and Miss Annie Murray of St. Louis, sister of the groom. The bride was attired in a beautiful grey broad cloth dress, tailor made, with hat and gloves to match. The groom is the eldest son of Hugh Murray of Potosi. He is a promising young man and holds a responsible position in St. Louis. After an elegant breakfast at the residence of the bride’s mother, the happy couple took the train for St. Louis via DeSoto, where they will reside in the future. They were recipients of many costly and useful presents.--Potosi Independent.

 

The preliminary examination in the case of the State of Missouri against John Obuchon, charged with an assault to kill one George Scott, at a picnic near Silver Lake on the 15th of July last, of which we made mention in our last issue, resulted in defendant being held for the grand jury in a bond of $600.00. The examination took up two days, about 35 witnesses having been examined. Defendant gave the required bon and was discharged from custody.  Perryville Sun.

 

Bloomsdale Items.

Born, to the wife of Squire A. F. Boyer on the 7th inst., a daughter.

 

Died, at this place on Thursday, September 7, 1893, at the age of thirty-three years, Mrs. Philomene Boyer, wife of Mr. William J. Boyer.

 

Deceased was the daughter of Mr. Clem Drury, one of the oldest and most respected citizens of Bloomsdale. She was united in marriage with Mr. William J. Boyer about thirteen years ago and leaves a husband and six children to mourn her death. The remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery on Friday afternoon at two o’clock, followed by a large concourse of mourning friends and relatives.

 

Minnith News.

 

Since my last correspondence, Mrs. Hall, mother of Seth Hall, died of old age. She was 76 years old. A son of Seth Hall also died of fever and congestive chills.

 

Fair Play,  September 23, 1893

Mr. Joseph Sexauer of this city and Miss Louise Buehler of Festus were married in this city on Monday, September 18th.

 

Marriage licenses were issued this week to Mr. Joseph Sexauer of Ste. Genevieve and Miss Louise Buehler of Festus, and to Mr. Charles Hansmann and Miss Rosina Frank, late of Germany.

 

Mrs. James J. Wilson died at her home in Herculaneum on September 3, 1893. An obituary notice was received today, but too late for publication in this issue. It will appear in our next. Bonne Terre Democrat.

 

The preliminary trial of Adam Buenniger, charged with obtaining money under false pretenses, took place before ‘Squire Cox in this city last Saturday. The defendant sas placed under a bond of $300 to await the action of the grand jury.

 

St. Mary News.

 

A little girl, daughter of Wm. Boland, who lives near Quarrytown, died Wednesday.

 

Mr. Conrad Muehlauser this week purchased the residence of Mr. Ignatius Faser in the West End. Consideration $450.

 

There seems to be some difficulty about locating the sight for the Kaskaskia church on the island. The washing away of the land has made its removal a necessity. The Bishop has selected a site, but it appears this does not suit the trustees of the Church and the town of Kaskaskia and they have bought a tract of land and are determined to have it located on that tract. The Bishop was there again this week endeavoring to settle the matter but up to the time of going to press we have not learned what has been done.  It seems the Church and pastor are dependent upon the rent of lands granted for the support, and these lands are under control on the trustees, hence the difficulty.

 

Fair Play,  September 30, 1893

Married, at the Catholic church in this city on Tuesday, September 25, 1893, by Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout, Mr. Charles Hansmann and Miss Rosina Frank. The contracting parties arrived here from Germany a couple of weeks ago.

 

Marriage licenses were issued this week to William H. Richards and Mrs. Mary Marlan of St. Mary’s, Felix A. Mattin of St. Louis county and Miss Agatha LaRose of Bloomsdale, and to Robert W. Hipes of Scott county and Miss Emily M. LaRose of Bloomsdale.

 

Mrs. Franz Deck died at her residence in this city on Tuesday, September 26, 1893, of dysentery. The remains were interred in the Valle Spring Catholic Cemetery on Thursday morning after a funeral mass had been sung for the repose of her soul by Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout.

 

From the Blackwell, Mo., correspondent of the DeSoto Gazette we learn that Miss Genevieve Skewes of this city was married last week at Blackwell to Mr. William Lee, Jr., and that the happy young couple will leave shortly for their home in Arkansas. The Fair Play extends congratulations. (transcriber’s note--see October 28,  1893 transcription for a follow up on this story)

 

Rev. Father Schaefer of Lawrenceton writes us from Cologne, Germany, under date of September 15th: “On the 10th of this month I arrived safely on the steamer “Elbe” at Bremen. The weather was splendid and the attractions during the voyage were many and pleasant ones. The next week I will surprise my friend Father Huttler, whom I expect to meet at Haasburg.”

 

Mr. Frank Moreau died at his mother’s residence in the city on Thursday morning, September 28, 1893, at five o’clock, of inflammatory rheumatism at the age of 32 years, 9 months and 22 days. Mr Moreau has been under the doctor’s treatment for the past nine years and during this long time bore his sufferings with patience and fortitude. Everything possible was done to relieve his sufferings and for months he was under the care of St. Louis doctors, but without avail. The deceased received the last sacraments of the Catholic Church before death and the remains were interred in the Valle Spring Catholic cemetery at three o’clock yesterday afternoon. Mr. Moreau leaves a mother, two sisters and five brothers to mourn his untimely loss.  The family have the sympathy of the entire community in their sad bereavement.

 

Obituary.

From the Bonne Terre Democrat.

At her home in Herculaneum, on Sunday, September 3, 1893, of consumption, Mrs. Emily J. Wilson, wife of Mr. James J. Wilson. Deceased leaves a husband and seven children to mourn her loss, viz: Miss Gussie Thompson and Mrs. Josephine Calliott, living in DeSoto; Mrs. Lulu Easter, of Bonne Terre, and Cora, Mollie, Clovis and Frankie who live at home. All the children are of age excepting Frankie who is but 8 years old and they were all at the bedside of their mother at the time of her death with the exception of Mrs. Easter who was herself very sick.

 

Mrs. Wilson was born and raised at Ste. Genevieve, Mo., and was married to her husband, who is also a native of that place on January 21, 1861, at the Catholic Church. Deceased was 45 years and 6 months of age at the time of her demise.  The remains were interred in the Catholic cemetery at Festus, Mo.

 

Fair Play,  October 7, 1893

Ben Gibler mashed his foot in such a manner at the quarry at Little Rock Wednesday that one of his toes had to be amputated. On Thursday morning Alex. Brown was struck on the head by a falling rock. The wound though painful is not a serious one.

 

Mrs. Harriet Schaaf, wife of Mr. Louis Schaaf, proprietor of the St. Mary Mill, died at her home at St. Mary’s on Wednesday, October 4th, 1893, at one o’clock P. M. of consumption, at the age of fifty-three years and nine months The deceased leaves a husband and six children, three sons and three daughters, to mourn her loss. The remains were interred in the St. Mary Catholic cemetery at nine o’clock yesterday morning, Rev. Father Wagner performing the last rites.

 

Marriage licenses were issued this week to Mr. Roy B. Woodson and Mrs. Maud N. Wilbur, both of St. Louis.

 

From Sunday’s St. Louis papers we learn that a marriage license was issued last Saturday to M Henry J. Roy of Bonne Terre and Miss Martha Burke of 1505 North Eleventh Street, St. Louis.

 

New hitching posts are being placed around the Court House square this week. This is a move in the right direction and the farmers will now have other places besides the trees to hitch their teams to.

 

A singular coincidence in the life of Mr. Wm. Richards, who was married on Sunday evening last, is that he has been married three times, each time marrying a widow with three children. Surely Mr. Richards must be a friend to the widows and fatherless. St. Mary Progress.

 

Found Dead in Bed.

From the St. Mary Progress.

 

Walter Thompson, aged 32 years, son of A. W. Thompson, who lives three miles south of St. Mary, was found dead in his bed Saturday morning by his father. He had been subject to epilectic fits since he was six years of age, and had been twice in the insane asylum, once at Nevada and once at Fulton. His case was apparently incurable, and the poor fellow is doubtless better off.

 

Engineer R. Howard who is connected with the Government river work, has in his possession a jar with a very live and very deadly creature not generally known to be among Missouri’s resources.

Howard’s pet is a tarantula, and is one of several which he espied running around at Brickey’s Mill, a river landing on the Mississippi, about forty-five miles from St. Louis.

He and a friend induced the big spider to enter an old canned meat box and with the aid of sticks got it to enter a glass jar.--Chronicle.

 

Fair Play,  October 14, 1893

Born, on Sunday, October 8, 1893, to the wife of Mr. Frank Roth, a son.

 

A son was born to Mrs. Evariste Burgert of this city on Thursday, October 5th.

 

Born, on Wednesday, October 4, 1893,to the wife of Mr. Henry J. Huck of this city, a son.

 

Born, on Friday, October 6, 1893, to the wife of Mr. Vincent Schwent of this city, a son.

 

Marriage licenses were issued this week to Francis Stolzer and Apolania Joggerst, Francis J. Stoll and Emily Siebert and to Felix Jokerst and Helen Huber.

 

Married, at the Catholic Church in this city on Tuesday, Oct. 10, 1893, by Rev. C. L. van Tourenhout, Mr. Louis Winston and Miss Josephine Roy, both of this city.

 

Mr. William M. Ziegler and Miss Elvina Vogt were married at the Catholic Church in this city on Tuesday morning, October 10, 1893, by Rev. Father Weiss. Immediately after the ceremony a quiet wedding reception was held at Mr. Vogt’s residence and the happy couple then departed by land for Pevely, Mo., on a visit to Captain Alex. Ziegler and wife and will visit Chicago and the World’s fair while on their bridal tour. They were the recipients of quite a number of handsome and valuable wedding presents. The groom, Mr. Ziegler, is one of Ste. Genevieve county’s most prosperous young farmers and the bride is the estimable daughter of Mr. Emile P. Vogt of this city.

 

Mr. L. E. Beeve’s house on the Plank Road came near being destroyed by fire last Tuesday morning. Mr. Beeve and his son work at the Government Quarries at Little Rock and Tuesday morning Mrs. Beeve left her home for about an hour to come to town, and on her return discovered the house to be on fire. The fire originated in the kitchen and had gained considerable headway when first seen by Mrs. Beeve, who, with the assistance of neighbors, extinguished the flames. It is the general opinion that the house was set on fire by some unknown parties as Mrs. Beeve declares that when she left home there was no fire in the house.

 

Married, in St. Louis on Saturday, Sept. 30, Mr. Henry J. Roy of Bonne Terre and Mrs. Martha Burke, of St. Louis. The bride is the handsome daughter of Mr. D M. Davis, foreman of the railroad boiler shops in this city and the groom is the junior member of the Democrat Publishing Co., of Bonne Terre. They will make their future home in Bonne Terre. The Gazette tenders its congratulations and wishes the youthful couple a long and happy wedded life. DeSoto Gazette.

 

Mr. Cyrus Wilson and Miss Elizabeth Morice were married at the Catholic Church in this city on Thursday October 12, 1893, by Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout. A ball was given at Union Hall in the evening by the young couple and a number of their friends were present to offer congratulations and wish them a happy journey through  life.

 

Obituary.

Died, at her residence in St. Mary’s, on Wednesday, October 4, 1893, of consumption, Mrs. Harriet Schaaf, aged 53 years, 9 months and 3 days.

 

Mrs. Schaaf was born in Perry county, Mo., on December 31, 1839, and was the oldest daughter of Walter L. and Mary J. Brown, nee Rochford. On April 6, 1863, she was married to Mr. Louis Schaaf of the St. Mary Mill Company. Six children were born to this union, three boys and three girls, all of whom are living.

 

The deceased had been an invalid for the past five years and her death was not unexpected. Mrs. Schaaf was blest with qualities of heart that made her an estimable wife and mother and shed the sunshine of peace and contentment aroud her home. She was known far and near for the goodness of her heart and for her charity towards the poor. It is safe to say that her death will be seriously felt by the destitute whom she so nobly assisted. Her bereaved husband and children have the sympathy of the whole community for the loss of a loving wife and mother.

 

Before her death the deceased received the last sacraments of the Catholic Church of which faith she was always a devoted member. The remains were interred in the St. Mary Catholic cemetery on Friday morning at ten o’clock after a funeral High Mass had been sung for the repose of the soul by Rev. Father Wagner. The funeral concourse sas one of the largest ever witnessed in St. Mary’s. R. I. P.

Fair Play,  October 21, 1893

The family of Rev. A. S. Coker left Wednesday for West Plains, where they will reside. Rev. Coker will  preach near that place. Rev. Coker came here several years ago to accept the position of principal of our public schools, which position he has filled for three years and has given general satisfaction. A short time since he gave us school teaching and entered the ministry. He was a good, moral, upright citizen and we regret to lose him from our midst. Success to yourself and family in your new calling. We can recommend them to the people of West Plains.--Fredericktown Argus.

 

Born, on Monday, October 16, 1893, to the wife of Mr. Ed Siebert of this city, a son.

 

The seven-year-old son of Mr. Matt. Ringwald of this city died on Monday last and was buried on Tuesday.

 

Miss Josephine Falk, eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. Falk of this city, was married at the Catholic Church on Tuesday morning, October 17th, 1893, to Mr. Henry Okenfuss, a popular business man of Ste. Genevieve, by Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout. The couple were attended by Misses Annie Falk and Lizzie Okenfuss, who acted as bridesmaids, and Messrs John Okenfuss and Anthony Baum, groomsmen. A sumptuous wedding breakfast was served at the residence of the bride’s parents after the ceremony to which the relatives and immediate friends of the contracting parties were invited. After congratulations and good wishes were exchanged the wedding party departed for the World’s Fair by way of Red Bud. The Fair Play extends congratulations.

 

Fair Play,  October 28, 1893

Married, on Tuesday, October 24, 1893, at the Catholic Church in this city by Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout, Miss Emily Siebert and Mr. Francis J. Stoll of Ste. Genevieve.

 

The case of the State vs. Anderson, assault with intent to kill was tried by a jury yesterday and defendant found not guilty. State vs. Silvery charged with disturbing the peace was brought before the Court and defendant plead guilty and was fined $1.00 and costs.

 

F. P. McLean, J. L. Pratt, Vest Rozier and F. Scheuring, attended probably the last ball that will ever be given in the old Kaskaskia court house, Monday night. The building is to be used as a temporary church during the removal of the present church to a safe location on the common near Dozaville. Work is to be commenced on the removal forthwith. We learn the ball was largely attended by people from Chester and surrounding towns. It is a pity that the old court building could not be moved and preserved also, on account of its association with so many historic events.--St. Mary Progress.

 

Willie the nine-year old son of Mr. Joseph Munsch of Farmington, died in that city last Saturday, October 21, of diptheria.

 

The trial of Henry Willis charged with the murder of Charles Cargile in Perry county about two years ago, occupied two day of the Court’s time this week. The case was hotly contested on both sides, Jno. V. Noel, T. B. Whitledge and C. A. Killian appearing for the defendant and Wm. Robb and Ralph Sprigg for the State.  After remaining out about three hours the jury brought in a verdict finding Willis guilty of murder in the second degree and placing his punishment at fifteen years in the penitentiary. The jury was composed of the following gentlemen: Henry Donze, Martin Kramer, J. W. Moore, Adolph Lalumondiere, Nicholas Jokerst, William Poston, William Crayson, John Alsbury, John F. Bequette, J. M. Thomure, George W. Murphy and J. S. Rickard.

 

Yesterday morning Judge Fox reduced the sentence of the prisoner to ten years in the penitentiary.

 

From a reliable source we learn that a certain citizen of Blackwell, whose name to us is know, deliberately misinformed the Gazette in an item which he sent in on Sept. 18, announcing that Mr. Wm. Lee, Jr. and Miss Genevieve Skewes were married at that place, as he had no warrant of authority whatever for making such a statement. We forbear comment, as we are loath to believe that the correspondent in question wa actuated by a malicious motive. In all probability he was merely playing what he conceived to be a capital practical joke. As the item was copied in several of our exchanges we hope its contradiction will receive equal publicity.--DeSoto Gazette.

 

Obituary.

From the Farmington News.

 

Died, at Doe Run, Mo., August the 31st, 1893, Finnis W. Silvery, son of James and Nancy Silvery, born December 6th, A. D. 1871 aged 21 years 8 months and 25 days. He leaves five sisters and seven brothers and loving father and mother to mourn his loss besides a multitude of sorrowing friends. The deceases was an industrious young man of good moral character, loved and esteemed by his associates; always honored his father and kind and loving mother. O, dear Finnis, we miss you in home, we miss you in society; but while you dear boy cannot return to us we are determined to try to meet you where parting and sorrow will be no more; we humbly bow to the will of our Lord and Master, and say thy will be done.

 

From the Perry County Republican.

Died, October 17, 1893, of typhoid fever, Andrew J. Huber, at his residence near St. Mary’s, aged 27 years. Young Huber, just a year ago Wednesday, was united in marriage to Miss Ella Krater, who survives him. The young couple started out with flattering prospects of a bright and prosperous future, but death being no respecter of persons called him from among us, and he died “ere manhood’s morn had touched noon: and it is another evidence of the fat that “while we are in the midst of life we are in death” Mr. Huber was the son of Andreas Huber, deceased, and was a most exemplary young man and popular with all who knew him. We extend our heartfelt sympathy to the young widow and relatives of the deceased. His remains were buried at the St. Mary’s Cemetery last Wednesday afternoon and the funeral was largely attended by sorrowing friends and relatives. As his young craft of life has drifted against the cold spar of death let us hope that it is the dawning of a brighter day.

 

Fair Play,  November 4, 1893

Born, on Saturday, October 28, 1893, to the wife of Mr. Joseph Gisi of Ste. Genevieve, a daughter.

 

A marriage license was issued this week to Mr. Joseph Galvin and Miss Mildred J. Adams, both of Saline township.

 

Willie, the little son of Joseph Munsch, died last Saturday morning. He was the first one in town reported to have diphtheria, and had so far recovered as to be able to run around for several days, but last Saturday morning about two o’clock he was taken with a fainting spell, and again about five o’clock. When Dr. Horn was called in,  his pulse was hardly perceptible. He died of paralysis of the heart, supposed to have been superinduced by diphtheria. Two of Mr. Munsch’s other children were reported sick, but the symptoms, we understand, are not diphtheric, only cold. The first of J. A. Lawrence’s little girls who was taken sick is convalescent and believed to be out of danger, but the second, a little girl of five years, is a very sick child yet. These, we believe, are the only cases of diphtheria that have appeared in town, and as there has been no spread of the malady it is confidently hoped that there is no danger of an epidemic.--Farmington Times.

 

Died, at his residence in St. Louis, on Tuesday, October 31, 1893, Mr. Anthony LaGrave in the 91st year of his age. We will publish an obituary next week.

 

Obituary.

From the Potosi Independent.

 

Died, At Potosi, Mo., October 21st, at 12:40 P. M., after a long protracted illness, Mrs. Fannie C. T., wife of Geo. B. Clark U. S. Revenue Agent, aged 46 years, 5 months and 22 days. The funeral took place from the residence of Mr. W. E. McGready to the family cemetery on Jefferson street, on Monday the 23rd inst. at 10 o’clock A. M. A large concourse of sympathizing friends being in attendance. Mrs. Clark was highly esteemed by all who knew her during her life. She leaves a bereaved husband, three children and two sisters, Mrs. George Griffith of Ste. Genevieve county, and Mrs. W. E. McGready of Potosi, and two brothers, besides a host of friends to mourn her loss. Religious services were conducted by Rev. Geo. W. Harlan of Farmington, assisted by Rev. H. Whitehead of Potosi.

 

Fair Play,  November 11, 1893

Born, on Sunday, October 29, 1893, to the wife of Mr. Michael Siebert, a daughter.

 

Miss Emilie Kippenberg, formerly of St. Mary’s, was married at her home in St. Louis last Wednesday to Mr. S. L. McClatchey.

 

Born, on Friday, November 3, 1893, to the wife of Mr. Joseph Donvan of this city, a son.

 

B. Evans (colored) was arrested at St. Mary’s last Monday and tried before ‘Squire Mattingly on a charge of stealing a watch from the store of Hoffman & Karst, and held in the sum of $300 to await the action of the Grand Jury. Not being able to give the required bond the defendant was brought to this city Tuesday and placed in jail. Prosecuting Attorney Huck represented the State in the trial and Mr. John V. Noel of Perryville looked after the interests of the defendant.

 

The remains of Mr. Anthony LaGrave, who died in St. Louis on Tuesday of last week, were brought to this city last Friday night and interred in the Valle Spring Catholic cemetery on Saturday morning after a funeral high mass had been sung for the repose of the soul by Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout. Mr. LaGrave was born in Canada on September 3, 1803, and was 90 years, 1 month and 28 days of age at the time of his death. He came to Ste. Genevieve when quite young and resided  here for a number of years. When the gold fever broke out in California Mr. LaGrave was one of the first to leave for that State. He opened the Petrequin lime quarry near Ste. Genevieve, and also the Sandstone quarry about four miles south of town in 1878. The deceased at one time owned the famous St. Joe Lead Mines which he sold in 1864.

 

Miss Ida Cox of this city was married to Mr. Edward Schaaf of St. Mary’s on Tuesday, November 7, 1893, at three o’clock P. M. by Rev. Father Weiss, at the residence of the bride’s parents in Ste Genevieve.  The wedding was very private, only the family and immediate relatives being present. After the ceremony the bride and groom departed for St. Mary’s where they will reside.  The bride is the daughter of Dr. J. B. Cox of this city and the groom, Mr. Schaaf, is bookkeeper at the St. Mary Mill. The Fair Play congratulates the young couple and wishes for them a life of joy.

 

Mrs. Harry Lawrence of St. Louis arrived here Monday to attend the marriage of her sister, Miss Ida Cox to Mr. Edward Schaaf.

 

Mrs. George Tebeau, Mrs. Virginia Watkins, Misses Lucie and Miriam Rozier, Mr F. A. LaGrave and daughter Marie and Ed. Sluder of St. Louis attended the funeral of Mr. Anthony LaGrave in this city last Saturday.

 

St. Mary News.

Geo. Covington (colored) was presented with triplets last Friday.

 

Fair Play,  November 18, 1893

Died, at his home near Coffman, Mo., on Tuesday, November 7, 1893, of pneumonia, Mr. William E. Boyd, aged thirty-five years. The deceased leaves a wife and four children to mourn his loss. The remains were interred in the Pleasant Hill cemetery.

 

Convicts David J. Douglas (fourteen years for murder from Pike County) and Charles Smith made their escape from the Chester Prison Monday night in a daring manner, but the latter was caught before he had gone a mile.

At the muzzle of a revolver Douglas took Turnkey Ed. Barth’s keys from him and with them made his escape, taking Smith with him. Barth raised the alarm before the men got out and Keeper McKee came to his assistance, but was fired on by the desperate convict and severely wounded. The convict was hit with one shot. It is supposed they made their escape through the railroad gate and went off down the river in skiffs, as Smith was caught on the bank of the river drying his clothes as if he had been overturned.

 

Minnith News.

Mr. Morris Welsch is in very bad health and Mr. Frank Munge is troubled considerable with cancer.

 

Sergt. Dawson Weds.

From Thursday’s Globe-Democrat.

 

A very quiet and pretty wedding took place at 5:30 o’clock yesterday morning at St. Kevin’s Church. The ceremony was performed by the Rev. Father Shea, the contracting parties being Miss Mary C. Lalley youngest daughter of the late Francis C. Lalley, formerly of Keokuk, Il., and Serg. James L. Dawson. The happy couple left on the morning train for Coldwater, Mich., the former home of the groom.

 

Fair Play,  November 25, 1893

The trial of Charles F. Roy charged with burglary and taken from this place to Farmington on a change of venue occurred last week and resulted in an acquittal. The jury remained out only five minutes before rendering their verdict.

 

Born, on Saturday, October 18, 1893, to the wife of Mr. Fritz Oehler of this city, a daughter.

 

Rudolph and Charles Doerge, Theo, Douglas and Dominic Kern, all Ste. Genevieve boys, passed down the river last Monday in a small boat on a hunting expedition. They intend to go as far as New Orleans and then sell their boat and return by land.

 

A Mrs. Shearlock from near Farmington was brought to town last Friday to be tried before Judge Koehler for insanity, but before the trial took place the court decided that the woman was a resident of St. Francois county and accordingly sent her back to Farmington.

 

Married, at the residence of Mr. John Rutledge at Danby, Mo., at 11:30 o’clock Tuesday morning, November 21, 1893, Rev. Hill officiating, Mr. William H. Skewes of this city and Miss Maggie Rutledge of Danby. The bride was attended by her sister, Miss Alice, and Mr. Angelo Canapa acted as groomsman.  Miss Rutledge is a sister of Dr. G. M. Rutledge of this place and the groom is the son of Mrs. Laura Skewes, who lives three miles south of Ste. Genevieve. After the ceremony a wedding dinner was served and the happy couple then left for Ste. Genevieve which place they will make their future home. The Fair Play extends congratulations and wishes for them a life of joy. Mr. Lempke and his bride were present at the ceremony.

 

Marriage licenses were issued this week to George Richardson of French Village and May Idial Byington of Union Township, and to Francis X. Gegg and Mrs. Martha Robinson, both of Saline Township.

 

Mr. Paul L. Lempke of Ste. Genevieve and Mrs. Laura A. Brooks of Festus were married last Tuesday morning, November 21, 1893, at the residence of the bride’s parents in Festus, Judge Warren officiating. Mrs. Brooks is the daughter of Mr. Reuben Burnett, an old and respected resident of this county, and a grand daughter of Mr. John Lee, formerly surveyor of Ste. Genevieve county. The groom Mr Lempke, is favorably known by every man, woman and child in our county and we have no doubt they will all join with the Fair Play in wishing Mr. and Mrs. Lempke a life of sunshine and happiness. The couple arrived here Tuesday evening and went at once to housekeeping. They were treated to a “chiravarie” Wednesday evening.

 

Fair Play,  December 2, 1893

“Big Eagle,” the big indian who accompanies “Dr. Spotted Wolf” (Jacob Morris) on his raids through Missouri, got on a big high lonesome down in Dunklin county and wound up by finding himself in the hands of the marshal. He was fined $50 for being too hilarious, and having no money and Dr. Wolf failing to put up for him, the big eagle was assigned to the rockpile, there to bemoan his downfall, owing to the peculiar customs and laws of the pale-faces.

 

Obituary.

Mr. Ambrose L. Barnes, the subject of this notice, died at his home in Union township, Ste. Genevieve county, Mo., about eleven o’clock on the morning of Nov. 22, 1893. He was born in Wilkes county, North Carolina, April 11, 1826 and emigrated to Missouri with his parents in 1838, and has lived here ever since. About ten days prior to his death he was stricken down with paralysis in the left side and from that very moment it was apparent that he could not rally, and when his soul should be called to the God who gave it seemed only a question of time. Yet he retained his conscience until the end. When about 27 years of age he was married to Miss Harriet Holman, who made life happy until death called him from her side. Unto this happy union were born ten children, 6 sons and 4 daughter, 7 of whom, together with his wife, are left behind to mourn his death. His son George was telegraphed for at Bonne Terre and he and his wife attended the funeral. Deceased was in his earlier days one of Ste. Genevieve county’s most progressive farmers and was very successful while his health permitted him to oversee the work in person. He leaves behind him the record of a well spent life. He was loved by all, respected by all and spoken of by all as a man of undoubted integrity, hence his death is mourned by all that knew him.

 

During his late illness everything that could be was done to alleviate his sufferings by friends and relatives, who were night and day wakeful and watchful. (lengthy editorial not transcribed). Deceased was buried in the “Laws” Cemetery on the day following his death, a large concourse of mourning friends and relatives attending the funeral. The funeral ceremonies were conducted by Rev. Mr. Parnell and Rev. M. Cunningham, both of the M. E. Church South. To those who were so kind in doing this, the last sad honors to the dead, we in behalf of the family extend our heartfelt and sincere thanks.--

 

Fair Play,  December 9, 1893

Married, in this city on Thursday, December 7, 1893, Mr. Geo. Totterson and Miss Caroline Hunt, both of Ste. Genevieve.

 

The search lights on the Equitable Building in St. Louis can be plainly seen in Ste. Genevieve every night. The lights have an intensity of rays equal to no less than 194,000,000 candles and can be seen at a distance of 85 miles. Anyone standing in the beam of light can read a newspaper at a distance of ten miles.

 

Died, on Friday, December 1, 1893, at St. Mary, Mo., the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. George Yallaly, aged one month.

 

Died, on Wednesday morning, December 6, 1893, of bronchitis, Clarence, the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Henry I. Kohm. The funeral occured on Thursday afternoon at two o’clock, Rev. Father F. X. Weiss officiating. The bereaved parents have the sympathy of the community in their sad loss.

 

Died, at her residence in St. Mary, at 6:20 P.M., Wednesday, of winter fever, Mrs. Eliza A Caldwell, aged about 59 years. Mrs. Caldwell was a sister of the late Dr. Byrne and has been a resident of this and Perry counties for about fifty years, and has many old friends and acquaintances in both counties. She has raised a large family (ten children) and was a kind and loving mother. She was a devout Catholic, and received the last rights of that church before her death. Five of her children  survive her, all of whom are grown. May she rest in peace.--St. Mary Progress.

 

Died, at her home in St. Louis on Tuesday, December 5, 1893, after a short illness, Mrs. Mary Y. LaBruyere, aged seventy-five years. The deceased was a sister of Messrs.’ Jules and Eli Boyer of this city. The funeral took place Thursday, December 7, at 10 A. M. from residence, No. 5720 South Broadway, to SS. Mary and Joseph’s Church, thence to Mount Olive Cemetery.

 

Died, at the family residence South Walnut street, Springfield, Ill, Sunday, November 19th, at 5 A. M., Mrs. Elizabeth M. Horine, in her 79th year.

 

Mrs. Horine was the daughter of Judge William James and was born April 11th, 1815, near Ste. Genevieve, Mo., married in 1830 to Thomas M. Horine, who afterwards became a captain in the Mexican war and a member of the Missouri legislature; in 1851 moved to Horine in this county; in 1872 she moved to Springfield, Ill., where she resided till her death. Mrs. Horine was always a devout Catholic, and unexcelled woman and mother and even in death we loved to look at her for the same noble, motherly look was still there. She leaves to mourn their loss, besides her numerous friends, grandchildren and great-grandchildren, two children, Mrs. S. M. Riley and Mr. J. B. Horine.--Hillsboro Democrat.

 

Fair Play,  December 16, 1893

Mr. Henry Rinke moved his family here from Danby this week.

 

Died, at New Offenburg, Mo., on Tuesday, December 12, 1893, at 8:30 P. M., Mrs. Mary Ann Gegg, aged 73 years, 4 months and 17 days. Mrs. Gegg was born in Alsace, July 16, 1820, and came to America in 1832. She was married to Mr. Francis X. Gegg in 1837. Nine children were born to this union , four girls and five boys, seven of whom are living. The deceased received the Sacraments of the Catholic Church before her death and the remains were interred at Weingarten on Thursday after a funeral mass had been sung for the repose of her soul by Rev. Father A. J. Huttler. Mrs. and Mrs. F. C. Faller of this city attended the funeral.

 

Mr. H. C. Ziegler’s house came near being destroyed by fire last Monday. About four cords of stove wood near the house caught afire and it required strong efforts to prevent the house from catching.

 

Fair Play,  December 23, 1893

Died, on Monday, December 18, 1893, Miss Annie Bell, aged 16 years. The remains were interred in the Valley Spring Catholic cemetery on Tuesday at one o’clock P. M.

 

Died, in this city, on Sunday, December 18, 1893, Mrs. Mary Ann Gisi, wife of Mr. August Gisi, one of Ste. Genevieve’s best farmers. Mrs. Gisi had been an invalid for years but her death last Sunday was sudden and unexpected and caused a shock to her many friends.

 

Mrs. Gisi, whose maiden name was Eckle, was born in Baden, Germany, on August 12, 1823, and came to America in January 1855 and was married a few weeks later to Mr. August Gisi. Four children were born to them, one girl and three boys. The girl died in infancy and the boys are all living, August M. at St. Mary’s, Frank A. at Okarche, Oklahoma, and Henry N. in this city. The remains were interred Tuesday morning in the Valley Spring Catholic cemetery after a funeral High Mass had been sung for the repose of the soul by Rev. Father C. L. van Tourenhout.

 

Fair Play,  December 30, 1893

 

The Old Church at Kaskaskia.

From the Globe-Democrat.

The work of demolishing the old church at Kaskaskia is about complete. The workmen reached the corner-stone a day or two ago, and it was carefully raised to the surface and the niche in it opened by Father Goosens in the presence of several interested spectators. The contents, however, were completely destroyed, evidently by water which had found its way into the receptacle. The records, whatever they might have been, were inclosed in a tin box and placed in a niche in the stone. Nothing remained but a mass of slimy mud, even the box being partly decayed. A search among the church records was rewarded by finding the following document written in French:

“An act of Laying the Corner Stone of the Catholic Church at Kaskaskia, July 4, 1838.”

“In the year of our Lord on thousand, eight hundred and thirty-eight, 4th of July, under the Pontificate of Pope Gregory XVL, Rt. Rev. Joseph Rosatti, being Bishop of St. Louis and having under his jurisdiction the States of Missouri, Arkansas and part of Illinois, Dear Rev. Benoit Raux being pastor of Kaskaskia and Director of the Convent of the Sisters of the Visitation, in the sixty third of the Declaration of Independence, Martin Van Buren being President of the United States of North America, and Joseph Duncan, Governor of the State of Illinois: --The corner stone of the church of Kaskaskia dedicated to the Immaculate Conception of the B. V. M., described as follows:  Two feet and three inches in length by two feet in width and one foot in thickness, marked with a cross on each side, with a niche five inches deep and three inches square cut in the center. This receptacle incloses a tin box containing authentic documents in reference to the benediction of said cornerstone; has been laid in accordance with the ceremonies prescribed by the Roman ritual, on the southeast corner, by the Right Reverend and Very Illustrious Bishop of St. Louis, accompanied by the Rec. Benoit Raux, pastor of Kaskaskia, etc., and the Rev. Jean Marie Odin, preter de la congregation de la mission, and in the presence of innumerable spectators. (Signed) “B. Raux.”

 

The church contained 350,000 brick, which were hauled away by forty teams voluntarily sent to the ruined building by devout farmers in the vicinity. The material is being used again in the construction of a new church upon a higher point of land about two miles distant, where it is thought the erosion of the river banks will not disturb it.

 

Minnith News.

Born, on Tuesday, December 5, 1893, to the wife of Mr. Vincent Cameron, a daughter.

 

Born, on Saturday, December 16m 1893, to the wife of Mr. Felix J. Rigdon of this city, a daughter.

 

Marriage licenses were issued since our last issue to : Alva Martin and Aurilly Carr of Cliff; Augustine B. Miller and Hattie V. Jones of Saline; Bernard Difani and Julia Lenz of St. Mary; Henry Gidley and Frances Schweiss of Zell.

 

Obituary.

Died, at Weingarten, on Dec. 25, 1893, at the residence of her son Henry, Mrs. Gertrude Donze, nee Munsch, relict of Seraphim Donze, deceased, aged 70 years, 9 months and five days.

 

Mrs. Donze was born at Felleringen, Alsace, March 20, 1823, and on October 5, 1847, was married to Mr. Seraphim Donze, who after a year of married life and the birth of their first child, left for America to prepare a new home for them. In 1849 Mrs. Donze crossed the ocean with her daughter Louisa, and her brother-in-law Mr. Meinrod Donze, of Ste. Genevieve, and after joining her husband in this country, settled down in the midst of the forest, on the very tract of land where Weingarten now stands. Of her voyage across the ocean she was fond of recalling the fact that they were forty-two days on the sea and that many fellow passengers died of cholera. Hospitality was one of her great virtues and as her husband was an extensive wine grower and a very successful farmer, plenty always greeted the welcome visitors from city and country. After the death of her husband and the marriage of her four children, she retired from the farm into a little cottage of her own, where amidst her children and grand-children she spent the last years of her life in the enjoyment of her labors, earning through her kindness to all, the title of “Grandma Donze.” Till the death of her intimate friend, Mrs. Gegg, Mrs. Donze enjoyed unusual good health, doing her own work and attending Church every morning. She went home from the burial with the incipient symptoms of pneumonia, took to her bed on Tuesday evening, Dec. 19, received the last sacraments on Saturday, Dec. 23, and quietly passed away (as she had predicted during her illness) on Xmas morning, Dec. 25, at 6:30 A. M.

 

The deceased was a sister of Mrs. Michael Specht of St. Louis and of Mr. Nicholas Munsch of Ste. Genevieve. She raised seven children, five boys and two girls:  Valentine, Joseph and Caroline preceded her to the grave while Henry, Seraphim, Nicholas and Louisa, now Mrs. Henry Schilli, with 22 grand children and one great-grand-child remain to mourn the loss of a devoted mother and grand-mother. The mortal remains were consigned to a spot near her husband in the Weingarten cemetery, amidst an enormous concourse of relatives and friends. Rev. Father Huttler officiated at High Mass and preached a very impressive sermon and Mr. Thos. Lang of Farmington directed the funeral cortege. May she rest in peace.

 

Bloomsdale News.

Died, at this place, on Monday, Dec. 25, 1893, of an affection of the bronchial tube, Mr. Vital LaRose. The deceased was one of our most respected citzens and one of our best farmers. He was born in this county on the 22nd day of May 1840, and was 53 years, 7 months and 3 days at the time of his death. The funeral took place on the 26th with a High Mass, Rev. Father Kurtenbach officiating.  The funeral was one of the largest in attendance ever witnessed at this place. The deceased leaves a wife and ten children to mourn over his grave. The bereaved wife and children have the sympathy of the entire community for their misfortune is the lost of a kind husband and a loving father. May his soul rest in peace.

 

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