William Holmes, Mary Blackwell Family History
William Holmes, Mary Blackwell Family History

compiled by Lynn Fusinato – 2008
 
William HOLMES was born in Maryland on 01-23-1777 during the turbulence
of the Revolutionary War.  After the war, he was raised somewhere in
Pennsylvania.   Almost nothing is known of his life before his mid-twenties.
Even the given names of his parents, step-parent and half-siblings are
unknown (although, reportedly, one of his half-sisters married a Chenoweth
and another married a Dixon).   Some time around 1800, William decided
to leave his clan of half-siblings in Pennsylvania and head west to seek his
fortune in what is now the state of Missouri.  He first obtained land in the
area of Missouri that currently is in St. Francois County.  Later, he moved
his family some 10 – 20 miles east to Ste. Genevieve County Missouri where
he homesteaded more acreage and where he died in 12-28-1851.

William’s children in Missouri seemed to think he was born in Pennsylvania,
but it was either he or his wife Mary who told the Census taker of 1850 that
he was born in Maryland.  His children may have been under the impression
that he was born in Pennsylvania because he probably told them stories about
his childhood and youth in Pennsylvania.  Presumably, he did not have stories
to tell about his living in Maryland because his family moved to Pennsylvania
when he was a very small child.  William’s great-grandson Augustus Stephen
Hinchey wrote that William had left numerous half-siblings living back in
Pennsylvania when he came west to settle in Missouri.  Most likely, one of
William’s parents died when he was quite young, the remaining parent
remarried and the blended family settled in Pennsylvania where most or all
of the half-siblings were born.

The first record of William Holmes in Missouri is his application to the Spanish
government for 800 arpents of land in 1800 before that area was turned over
to France in October of that year.   According to history professor Robert S.
Douglas in his book “History of Southeast Missouri,”  William Holmes settled
in an area in the south-eastern part of St. Francois Co. MO that was called
Cooks Settlement after Nathaniel Cook, the first settler to acquire land in that
vicinity. Douglas reported that William Holmes, Jesse Blackwell, James Caldwell,
Elliott Jackson and James Davis all located claims in that area not long after
Nathaniel Cook settled there in 1800.

William probably met his wife Mary, daughter of Elizabeth Smith and Jesse
Blackwell, soon after the Blackwell family moved to St. Francois county from
east Tennessee in the winter between 1806-1807.  Mary Blackwell and most of
her siblings had been born in Virginia where her parents had met and married
in 1783.  Around 1800 when young Mary was about twelve, Jesse Blackwell
moved his family to Tennessee and about six years later again moved his
family westward on to Missouri.  In Missouri  Jesse purchased land that was
adjacent to William Holmes’ property in Cook Settlement from Nathaniel Cook.  
William courted Mary and the young couple soon married in early October
of 1807, most likely setting up housekeeping on William’s property next door
to her parents.  Eleven months later their first child James Wells Holmes was
born.  Over the next twenty years, William and Mary had at least eight children:
James Wells, Thomas Edward, Lucinda Smith, Elizabeth Stevenson, William
Isom, Alexander Washington, Robert Blackwell and Richard Madden Holmes.

Government Land Office records show that during the 1820s William Holmes
was awarded land patents in the Saline township of Ste. Genevieve Co.   This
probably meant that sometime between 1810 and 1820 Holmes had moved
his wife and children to his new Ste. Genevieve County homestead located
just west of present day Coffman, MO, and not far from some of his friends,
the Hollomans and the Maddens.  William had known these friends at least
since the early 1820s.  In fact, in 1821 he had signed as a witness to the will
of Edmund Holloman and in 1824 he had named his youngest son for Richard
Madden who had migrated from Pennsylvania to Missouri in the 1790s.   
(There is a possibility that William Holmes may have known Richard Madden
back in Pennsylvania and might even have been a cousin.)  Four of William
Holmes’ children married descendants of these two friends.  Lucinda, oldest
daughter of William and Mary, married Allan W. Holloman, the oldest son of
Edmund Holloman, while her youngest brother Richard Holmes married
Rachel Holloman, a granddaughter of Edmund and a daughter of Lucinda’s
husband by his first wife Rachel Counts.  Two of the Holmes’ sons, Thomas E.
and William I., married Rachel and Margaret Madden, both daughters of
Richard Madden.  

After William’s father-in-law Jesse Blackwell was declared mentally incompetent
in 1828, the Holmes couple brought Mary’s parents to live with them where they
could better see to their care.  The Blackwell couple remained with the Holmes
until they died, Jesse in 1836 and Elizabeth in 1843.  William Holmes was legally
appointed the guardian of Jesse Blackwell in 1828, well before the older man’s
death.  A legal probate estate was created for Jesse when his guardianship was
setup by the court and William Holmes was required to report periodically to the
court an accounting of the funds from the estate that were used in support of
the old couple.  For the years between 1828 and 1843, yearly expenditures of
$5 and $80 were reported for the services of a slave woman Kate and a slave
man Joe, respectively, to care for the old couple.

There are court records that show the 19-year-old slave woman Kate had
been owned by the Blackwells in 1825 when Jesse sold Kate to his son William
with the intention that Kate’s services would be rented during the lifetime of
the elderly couple for their care.  Possibly, her sale price was a bargain since
the yearly charge for her services after 1828 was only $5.  The male slave
Joe, whose services were much more expensive, most likely belonged to
William Holmes since William did not name an owner for Joe in the court
accounting as he did for Kate.  In addition, the 1852 probate papers for
William Holmes estate show that at the time of his death in 1851 Holmes
owned a 45-year-old slave named Joseph who would have been 22 in 1828.  
It also seems likely that the 65 year old black man Joseph Holmes who was
listed as a laborer in the 1870 Census for the Saline township of Ste.
Genevieve County may have been the former Holmes slave Joseph and
caretaker of the Blackwells.

In the later 1840s, William and his son Robert B. Holmes moved some five
miles east of Coffman and established new homesteads just to the east of
the town of River Aux Vases, which is also in Ste. Genevieve County.   
However, before William was able to secure ownership of his new homestead,
he died in late 1851.  Probate records show that his heirs petitioned the court
to sell William’s right to that land.  Possibly his son Robert B. Holmes bought
those rights from the other heirs.  In 1856 and 1857 Robert was able to gain
ownership of a number of parcels of land as land patents in that area and
possibly one or more of them had been the land where William and Mary had
been homesteading when William died.  

William and Mary’s oldest son James Wells Holmes married Sarah Couzens in
the early 1830s.  She was the daughter of Irishman William Cozens, a neighbor
of William Holmes at the time of the 1830 Ste. Genevieve County Census.  
(Note – Various spellings of Couzens found in records includes Cozens and
Cousins.)  James homesteaded about 70 acres of land in Ste. Genevieve County
in the 1830s and was able to obtain land patents for the property in 1837.  In
the early 1850s after his father had died, James moved to Dent County where
his first cousin William Blackwell lived and obtained land patents for 160 acres
of land there in the mid to late 1850s.  In 1860 James received patents for
200 acres of land in Reynolds County.  James probably died in the early to mid
1860s possibly leaving minor children.  Between 1835 and 1850 James and Sarah  
Holmes had five daughters (Ruth Ann, Mary, Lucinda, Catherine and Maria) and
one son Thomas.  Daughter Lucinda married John Slade Haddock in the early
1870s in Ste. Genevieve Co. and they had four daughters and many later
descendants.  It is not known what happened to Lucinda’s sisters but at the time
of the 1860 census, her brother Thomas lived near his father’s cousin William
Blackwell in Dent county along with a wife Eliza A. and their two-year-old son
James Holmes.  During the Civil War, Thomas died in a Union prison.  His son
James apparently grew up, married a young woman named Sarah and they lived
in Dent County in 1880 with their small two sons Thomas and James.  

William and Mary Holmes’ second son Thomas Edward Holmes homesteaded
65 acres of land in Ste. Genevieve county in the 1830s and obtained the land
patent for that property in 1837.  A couple of years later he married Rachel
Madden, the daughter of his father’s good friend Richard Madden and they
had four children (Letitia, Mary, Margaret and James William Holmes).  In the
mid-1840s, the couple decided to follow Rachel’s older sister and two of her
Madden uncles to Arkansas and they settled in Perry County where Thomas
farmed and practiced as a medical doctor.  Around 1854 Rachel died and a
few years later Thomas married a German immigrant Susannah Klackle.  
Thomas and Susannah had two more sons, William who died young and
Thomas Edward Holmes Jr. who lived into the 1920s.  During the Civil War,
Thomas was elected to a two year term as County Clerk of Perry County after
the former County Clerk, his cousin William H. Blackwell (eldest son of Robert
Blackwell), joined the CSA in 1862 and left to fight in the war.  According to
family legend, Thomas took his wife, children and the county records to the
Hill Country in Texas during the remainder of the war to ensure their safety.   

Lucinda Smith Holmes, the older daughter of William and Mary, married
widower Allan Wolford Holloman in 1830.  The couple and Lucinda’s step-
daughter Rachel Holloman lived with her parents for a while after they first
got married.  When they moved to their own home, it was on Allen’s property
that was adjacent to her father’s homestead.  Lucinda and Allen had seven
children while living next door to her parents and her children ran in and out
of her parents home as freely as they did their own home.  In fact, Lucinda’s
step-daughter and Lucinda’s youngest brother spent so much time together
that they became sweethearts and married around 1845.  As the number
of children increased, it became more difficult for Lucinda to attend to so
many children and still run her household.  So Lucinda welcomed visits by
her unmarried younger sister Elizabeth who often came over to care for and
entertain Lucinda’s children, especially her sickly young son Allen Augustus.

The mid-1840s were marred by deaths in the family, first Lucinda’s
father-in-law Edmund Holloman in 1843, then Allan Holloman’s sister
Elizabeth and Lucinda’s sister Elizabeth both in 1845.  Lucinda’s brothers
William Isom and Thomas Edward moved their families from Ste. Genevieve
Co. MO to Arkansas in the mid to late 1840s and about the same time her
parents William and Mary and her brother Robert Holmes decided to move
about five or so miles east to homestead new farms.  It was not long before
Lucinda and Allan decided to move too.  However, they moved west about
sixty miles to Arcadia, MO, in what was then Madison County and is now
Iron County.  Allan’s mother, sister and two brothers with their wives and
children moved from Ste. Genevieve Co. to Arcadia with them and this large
group lived in two houses next door to each other in 1850.  Unfortunately,
this family group did not stay happy together for very long.  Within two or
three years, Allen’s mother and two brothers had moved down to Mississippi
where another of Allen’s brothers had married the daughter of a rich
plantation owner.  Allen’s sister married a widower who lived in Crawford Co.
MO and moved there to his farm.  Lucinda and Allen spent the rest of their
lives in Arcadia where three more children were born to them in the 1850s
and many grandchildren after that.   

Elizabeth Holmes, the second daughter of William and Mary, died of  
“congestive chill” in 1845.  She was unmarried and living with her parents
when she realized that her illness might be fatal.  It was just a day or so
before she died that she decided to write a will leaving all of her property to
her sister Lucinda’s three-year-old son Allen Augustus Holloman.  Two of her
brothers signed the will as witnesses but many of her relatives were present
when she and her brothers signed her will which made her brother-in-law Allen
Holloman executor of her estate.  After her death and burial, some contention
within the family arose over the will and a lawsuit was filed.  Her oldest brother
James who had signed the will as one of the witnesses now claimed she had not
been in her right mind when she signed the will.  Her youngest brother Richard,
who also signed as a witness of her will, testified at the trial that she was in her
right mind when she signed the will.  The result of the case in the county court
was that her brother Robert would act as administrator of her estate instead
of young Allen Augustus’ father being the executor but that the will was valid
and young Allan Augustus was to inherit her estate.  The case was appealed to
the state Supreme Court where both brothers who signed as witnesses to the
will refused to testify.  Since there were so many other people who could testify
as to what occurred when the will was signed, the Supreme Court ruled that
the two witnesses who signed the will would be allowed to abstain from testifying,
which turned out to be a president setting case.  The Supreme Court upheld
the lower court judgment and young Allen Augustus was the sole heir of her
estate.  Elizabeth’s estate consisted of three small slaves between the ages
of 5-7, 100 acres of land that had once been part of a Spanish land grant
belonging to Thomas Madden and her bedroom furnishings.  Her estate was
worth $700 to $1000 which is surprising for an unmarried woman back in the
1840s.  Presumably, she had been given this property by her parents which
would suggest that William and Mary Holmes probably gifted each of their
adult children with property, possibly 100 acres each and some cash which
Elizabeth had used to buy small slaves.

In the early 1840s William Isom Holmes, third son of William and Mary, married
Margaret Madden, a daughter of his father’s friend Richard Madden.   Shortly
after their first son was born, the young couple decided to move to Arkansas
where Margaret’s oldest sister Honore Madden lived with her husband Charles
Madden and two of Margaret’s Madden uncles.  It is very likely that William and
Margaret moved to Arkansas around 1845 along with William’s brother Thomas
and his sister-in-law Rachel, who was another of Margaret’s sisters.  After
settling in Arkansas, William and Margaret had a daughter and two more sons.  
When William Isom’s father William Holmes died in late 1851, his brother Thomas
gave him power of attorney to collect Thomas’ inheritance for him so that only
William had to go back to Ste. Genevieve to settle the estate.  (Is it possible there
was still bad blood in the family over the settling of sister Elizabeth’s estate?)  
In 1860 William obtained ownership of a 40 acre land patent in Perry county and
remained in Arkansas for the rest of his life except for the time he and his wife
spent in Texas during the Civil War.  It is quite likely that William took his family
to Texas with his brother Thomas in order to escape the dangers of the war.  
After the war ended, William brought his family back to Arkansas shortly after
his oldest son Richard Madden Holmes returned to the family’s homestead in
Perry Co. AR from fighting in the war.  William Isom’s cousin William H. Blackwell
also returned to Perry County after the war, married William Isom’s only daughter
Mary Arkansas Holmes in 1866 and settled there to raise their family.  A good
number of William Isom and Margaret Holmes’ descendents still live in Arkansas.  
Years after William Isom died, one of his younger sons, a Perry County Deputy
Sheriff, was murdered and the murderer was lynched by a mob.  

Little is known about Alexander Washington Holmes, the fourth son of William
and Mary Holmes.  Alexander was living in Ste. Genevieve Co. MO when his
sister Elizabeth died in 1845.  However, by the time his father William Holmes
died in 1851, Alexander was dead.  It is thought that Alexander died in 1846
unmarried.

The fifth son of William and Mary was Robert Blackwell Holmes, named for
his mother’s brother Robert Blackwell (father of the William Henry Blackwell
mentioned above who married William Isom Holmes’ daughter Mary.)  Robert
Holmes married Sarah McFarland, daughter of Rev. John McFarland, in 1848.  
The couple had nine children but none of their three sons survived childhood
while only four of their daughters reached adulthood.  Robert and Sarah were
living with his parents in 1850 and Robert served as the administrator of his
father’s estate after William died.  Robert obtained land patents for 270 acres
of land in Ste. Genevieve Co. near the community of River Aux Vases in the
later 1850s.  He and his family remained on these homesteads until sometime
after 1880 when they moved east to Perry Co. MO.  His wife Sarah died in
Perry Co. in 1887 and Robert was probably living there too when he died in
1892.   However, their bodies were taken back to the Old Stone Cemetery in
Ste. Genevieve Co. to be buried, probably because that is where their parents
were buried.  Tombstones for both Robert and Sarah Holmes and a good
number of their children and grandchildren can be found in that cemetery today.

The youngest son Richard Madden Holmes fell in love with his sister
Lucinda’s step-daughter Rachel Holloman and they married in late 1845.
Reportedly, they had three children (Mary, William and Allen) before
Richard died in early 1850.  Daughter Mary was not listed with her mother
and two brothers in the 1850 census, indicating she probably had died
either before or at the same time as her father Richard.  By 1854, probate
papers for William Holmes’ estate show that his son Richard had only one
living child remaining, Allen, who inherited all of Richard’s share of William’s
estate.  Young Allen’s grandfather Allan W. Holloman had been appointed his
guardian after his father Richard died and a probate estate was setup under
the guardianship.  Papers in his probate estate indicated that young Allen
had inherited from his father Richard 100 acres of land that had once been
part of Thomas Madden’s Spanish land grant in addition to property from
William Holmes’ estate.  (Possibly William Holmes had gifted that 100 acres
to Richard about the time his son turned 21 in 1845.)  In 1851 Allen Holmes’
mother Rachel remarried and she had at least five more children before
her new husband died of wounds received in battle during the Civil War.  
Husbandless, Allen’s mother brought all of her children to live in Arcadia,
MO, in 1864 so that they would be near her father Allen W. Holloman and
his family.  While young Allen had his inheritance to fund sending him to
the local boarding Academy to get a good education, his half-siblings did
not fare so well.  His widowed mother either did not inherit much money
from her second husband or she spent it unwisely so that in the late 1860s
she and her other children were going hungry despite living close to her
father.  Either her father was oblivious as to her circumstances or she kept
it from him because she was too proud to let him find out.  In 1871, young
Allen Holmes came into the residue of his inheritance (about $900) and
left Arcadia to go visit his Holloman great-uncles in Mississippi.  It is not
known what happened to him after that except that reportedly he did
not marry.

Matriarch Mary Holmes may have lived with her son Robert Blackwell
Holmes for a few years after her husband died but by 1860 she was living
with her daughter Lucinda Holloman’s family in Arcadia, MO.   Possibly a
factor in Mary’s choosing to move to Arcadia was the fact that her sister
Elizabeth S. Blackwell Collins had moved to Arcadia with husband Charles
C. Collins and sons Charles and John Collins in the 1850s.  The older Collins
couple were living there when they died in the early 1860s and are buried
in the Masonic Cemetery outside of Arcadia where many of the Hollomans
are buried.  While Mary Holmes remained in Iron County with the Holloman
family until she died in 1870, she is not buried in that Masonic Cemetery.

Robert Blackwell Holmes’ father-in-law John McFarland was an itinerant
Methodist Episcopal minister for the Maramec, Saline, Coldwater and
St. Francois circuits in Missouri beginning in 1810 and probably continuing
until shortly before his death in 1846.  The Holmes, Blackwells and Hollomans
probably all belonged to Methodist Episcopal congregations that were
assigned to the Rev. McFarland at one time or another between 1810 and
1846.  The Old Stone Methodist Meeting House in Ste. Genevieve County
apparently was built on McFarland’s land near Coffman, MO, around 1840
and it is very probable that John McFarland, his wife Elizabeth, William
Holmes, his wife Mary, his children Elizabeth, Alexander and Richard Holmes
and possibly Mary Holmes’s Blackwell parents are all buried in unmarked
graves in the Old Stone Cemetery that was adjacent to that meeting house.  
Those graves may have had markers back one hundred and fifty years ago
but, if so, the markers did not survive the ravages of weather and vandalism.

While it is not known who William Holmes’ parents were, it is known that
Richard Madden was the son of Thomas Madden and Margaret Brown and
that Margaret Brown Madden was the daughter of Honour Wells Holmes
Brown and her second husband Richard Brown.  Houour Wells, daughter
of James Wells, had first been married to a William Holmes and the Holmes
couple had had some eight to ten children before he died around 1758.  
These children were born in Maryland where the couple lived.  Among the
children were sons Thomas, William, James and Alexander Holmes.  Land
records show that when son William Holmes became of age during the early
1770s that he sold the land he inherited from his father to his step-father
Richard Brown.  No other records have been uncovered that can definitely
be tied to this son William after the early 1770s.  

I wonder did Honour’s son William Holmes marry, have a son of his own
born in Maryland that he named William and then die either of natural
causes or because of wounds received during the Revolutionary War,
leaving a young widow who remarried and produced a number of children,
half-siblings to his son?  Might that son, young William Holmes, have grown
up in Pennsylvania and become close friends with his cousin Richard
Madden, son of his father’s half-sister Margaret Brown Madden?  Might
this young William Holmes have decided to go west to join his aunt Margaret,
her husband Thomas Madden and the Madden cousins in the late 1790s to
seek his fortune with them?  Might our William Holmes be such a nephew
of Margaret Brown Madden and first cousin to his good friend Richard
Madden?  Might our William Holmes have named his first son James Wells
Holmes after his grandmother Honour Wells Holmes Brown’s father James
Wells or maybe after another relative of that same name?  Might William
have named his sons Thomas and Alexander after his father’s brothers?  
This is all just speculation but it is a plausible hypothesis that needs further
research to either prove or disprove it.

 ========================================

          BLACKWELL-HOLMES GENEALOGY CHART

1 Jesse “Topoey” BLACKWELL, b. abt 1761; d. 12/15/1836
         (“Topoey” was probably what his grandchildren called him.)
…+ Elizabeth Smith, m. Chesterfield County, VA 02/25/1783,
…………………………….d. 1843 MO
…..2 Mary (“Polly”) BLACKWELL, b. 02/(14/29)/1788 VA,
…………………………….d. 07/05/1870 MO, m. 10/04/1807
…….+ Capt. William HOLMES, b. 01/23/1777 MD/PA,
…………………………….d. 12/28/1851 Ste. Genevieve Co. MO
………3 James Wells HOLMES, b. 09/11/1808 MO, d. aft. 1852
……….+ Sarah COUZENS, b. 03/13/1810 TN; m. 10/11/1832 MO       
………………..daughter of William Couzens & sister of James & William H. Couzens
………..4 William HOLMES, b. 08/19/1833 MO; d. 07/11/1835 MO
………..4 Ruth Ann HOLMES, b. 03/19/1835 MO
………..4 Mary Elizabeth HOLMES, b. 04/24/1837 MO
………..4 Thomas HOLMES, b. 02/25/1840 MO; d. 12/31/1864 Rock Island, IL
………..4 Lucinda Jane HOLMES, b. 01/23/1844 MO; d. 12/12/1930 Chicago, IL
…………+ John Slade HADDOCK, b. June 1851 MO; d. 01/03/1928 IL;
………………..m. 08/15/1872 Ste. Genevieve Co. MO  
………..4 Catherine Ellen HOLMES, b. 1846 MO
………..4 Maria Ruth HOLMES, b. 11/14/1848 MO
………3 Thomas Edward HOLMES, b. 11/14/1810 MO; d. bet. 1870-1880
………+ Rachel MADDEN (1st wife), b. abt. 1820 MO; d. 12/31/1854 AR;
………………..m. 1839 MO; daughter of Richard Madden, Ste. Genevieve Co. MO
………..4 Letitia HOLMES, b. abt. 1840 MO, m. a BURKE, a VICK,
………………………………………..a HOOPER and P. J. DOWNS
………..4 Mary HOLMES, b. abt. 1842 MO
………..4 Margaret HOLMES, b. abt. 1844 MO,
…………………………….d. 11/22/1909, m. 1865 –  Marcus Lafayette HICKEY
………..4 James HOLMES, b. abt. 1847 AR, d. aft 1880
………+ Susannah KLACKLE (2nd wife), b. abt. 1825 in Bavaria
……………………………….Germany, d. aft 1870
………..4 William HOLMES, b. 1858 AR, d. bef 1870?
………..4 Thomas Edward HOLMES Jr., b. abt 1861 AR, d. aft 1920
…………+ Ellen Orelieran LOFLIN, b. 1863
…………..5 Jethro S. HOLMES, b. abt. 1889 AR, d. 1916
…………….+ Lillian B. LastNameUnk
…………..5  Thomas Erwin HOLMES, b. 1891, d. ?
…………..5  Sybil HOLMES, b. 1892, d. ?
…………..5  Mamy HOLMES, b. 1895, d. ?
………3 Lucinda Smith HOLMES, b. 11/(12/18)/1812 MO, m. October, 1830
…………………………….d. 01/08/1888 Iron Co. MO, was Allen’s second wife
………+ Allen W. HOLLOMAN, b. 01/01/1805 in NC,
…………………………….d. 05/05/1895, Iron Co. MO
………..4 Mary Ann HOLLOMAN, b. 11/06/1831 MO.
…………………………….d. 03/22/1910 MO, m. William Nixon GREGORY
………..4 Sarah Emeline Cook HOLLOMAN, b. 12/21/1833 MO,
…………………………….d. 04/05/1845 MO
………..4 Lucinda Jane HOLLOMAN, b. 01/19/1836 MO,
…………………………….d. 11/01/1916 MO, m. William J. HINCHEY
………..4 William Holmes HOLLOMAN, b. 05/20/1838 MO,
…………………………….d. 08/20/1861 MO in Civil War, unmarried
………..4 Allan Augustus HOLLOMAN, b. 03/16/1841 MO,
…………………………….d. 01/22/1886 MO, unmarried
………..4 Thomas Edmund B. HOLLOMAN, b. 10/08/1843 MO,
…………………………….d. 03/05/1920 MO, m. Precia Matilda BOLLINGER
………..4 John Wesley HOLLOMAN, b. 08/01/1846 MO,
…………………………….d. abt. 01/03/1903, unmarried
………..4 Robert Fillmore HOLLOMAN, b. 09/09/1851 MO,
…………………………….d. 02/15/1943, m. Mary BUCKNER
………..4 Barbara Josephine “Josie” HOLLOMAN, b. 03/01/1854 MO,
…………………………….d. 12/12/1929, briefly married a BURTON of NY?
………..4 Joel Bugg HOLLOMAN, b. 11/18/1856 MO,
…………………………….d. 04/09/1926 MO, unmarried
 
………3 Elizabeth (“Bettie”) Stevenson HOLMES, b. 12/20/1814 MO,
…………………………….d. 08/08/1845 MO, of “congestive chill”, unmarried
………3 William Blackwell HOLMES, b. 08/26/1816 MO,
…………………………….d. 1816 MO
 
………3 William Isom HOLMES, b. 12/27/1817 MO, d. 03/04/1874 AR
……….+ Margaret MADDEN, b. 12/15/1823 MO,
…………………………….d. 10/08/1899 AR, m. 03/17/1842 MO
………………………daughter of Richard Madden, Ste. Genevieve Co. MO
………..4 Richard Madden HOLMES, b. 05/30/1843 MO,
…………………………….d. 06/25/1895 MO
…………+ Mary Susan BURKE, b. 1852 MS, m. 02/13/1873
…………………………….d. 1881 AR,  
…………..5 Charles HOLMES, b. 1875, d. aft. 1880
…………..5 Mary Ellen HOLMES, b. 05/24/1877 AR, d. 06/23/1951 AR
……………..+ J. L. BULL. m. 12/01/1894 AR
……………..+ M. L. ROGERS, m. 03/08/1910 AR
…………..5 Maggia Nola HOLMES, b. 02/10/1880 AR,
…………………………….d. 02/13/1969 AR
……………..+ John Forester BULL, m. 05/23/1896 AR
………..4 Mary Arkansas HOLMES, b. 11/25/1845 AR,
…………………………….d. 08/02/1903 AR, m. 11/20/1866 AR
…………+ William Henry BLACKWELL, b. 1825 MO, son of Robert Blackwell
…………………………….d. bef. 1900, a first cousin of William I. HOLMES
…………..5 William Issac BLACKWELL, b. 05/28/1869 AR,
…………………………….disappeared 10/22/1924, unmarried
…………..5 Ida BLACKWELL, b. 07/23/1871 AR, m. 06/04/1890  AR
…………………………….d. 03/1957 AR, husband Phillip Landia BURROW
…………..5 Barbara Ellen BLACKWELL, b. 02/20/1874 AR, d. ? TX,
…………………………….m. 09/16/1900 MO  – Robert Loving NICHOLS
…………..5 Eva “Evy” BLACKWELL, b. abt 1876
……………+ Albert Johnston PATTERSON
…………..5 Henry B. BLACKWELL, b. 09/06/1878 AR, d. 05/04/1927 TX,
…………………………….m. 05/29/1902 OK – Maggia WOOD  
…………..5 Nova Belle BLACKWELL, b. 11/06/1882 AR, d. 11/26/1975 CA,
…………………………….m. 03/01/1920 AR – Charles Benjamin LINZY
………..4 Thomas I. HOLMES, b. 01/22/1849 AR, d. 05/16/1892 AR
…………………………….assistant deputy murdered by jailed prisoners
………..4 William L. HOLMES, b. 11/21/1853 AR, d. 09/05/1892 AR
…………+ (Amanda/Martha E.)  LastNameUnk, b. 1860 MO
……………5 Cordelia M. HOLMES, b. abt. 1879 AR
 
………3 Alexander Washington HOLMES, b. 07/03/1819 MO;
…………………………….d. 1846, never married
………3 Robert Blackwell HOLMES, b. 07/11/1822 MO,
…………………………….d. 07/16/1892 MO, m. 1848 MO
……….+ Sarah Clara (Carry) MCFARLAND, b. 10/18/1823 MO,
…………………………….d. 05/01/1887 MO
………..4 James McFarland HOLMES, b. 03/11/1849, d. 09/08/1850
………..4 Elizabeth Emily HOLMES, b. 02/14/1851 MO, d. 05/02/1921 *
…………+ Lucian TALLEVAST b. 01/10/1843 * Normandy France,
…………………………….d. 01/30/1899, m. 06/15/1871 married by
……………………………Rev. Andrew PEACE, husband of Carry’s sister
…………..5 Dolphine Leocadia “Aldophina” TALLEVAST *,
…………………………….b. 04/25/1872 MO, d. Dec. 1945 MO, unmarried  
…………..5 Sara H. TALLEVAST, b. 03/20/1874, m. 04/11/1899
…………………………….d. 12/15/1953 Ste Genevieve Co. MO
……………+ William Varner BROWN, b. abt 1871 MO, d. aft 1920
……………..6 Varner BROWN, b. abt 1900 MO
……………..6 Zetia BROWN, b. abt 1903 MO
……………..6 Jennings BROWN, (son) b. abt 1905 MO
……………..6 Sadie BROWN, b. abt 1907 MO
……………..6 Genevieve BROWN, b. abt 1909 MO
……………..6 Dolphine BROWN, b. abt 1913 MO
…………..5 Albert E. TALLEVAST, b. May 17, 1882 MO,
…………………………….d.  12/08/1950 Beauvis twsp MO,  
……………+ Florence ALLEN, b. 7 Apr 1894,
…………………………….d. Jul 1968 – St Mary, Ste Genevieve, MO
……………..6 John A. TALLEVAST, b. 11/01/1917 MO, d. 01/19/1993
…………………….buried Jefferson Barracks Nat. Cem., St. Louis, MO
……………..6 Emily Louise TALLEVAST, b. 04/14/1919 Beauvais,
…………………………….Ste Genevieve, MO, d. 12/28/1926
……………..6 Erma TALLEVAST, b. abt 1921 Beauvais, MO,  
……………..6 Adela (Adolphine Leocadia?) TALLEVAST,
…………………………….b. abt 1923 MO
……………..6 Alfred TALLEVAST, b. 26 May 1926 MO,
…………………………….d. Sep 1984 – Rio Rancho, Sandoval, NM
……………..6 Adolph L. (Leocadia?) TALLEVAST, b. 16 Oct 1927 MO,
…………………………….d. Jul 1990 MO    
………………..7 Alfred H Tallevast, b. Sep 1950
………………….+ Vicky K LastNameUnk, b.  2 Jul 1951,
…………………………….d. 1994, buried 24 Mar 1994 Nat. Cem. in MO
………………..7 Leonard C Tallevast, b. Jul 1955  
…………..5 Estella Jessamine TALLEVVAST, b. 06/06/1878,
…………………………….m. Harry MCBRIDE
…………..5 Grace Emily TALLEVAST, b. 01/07 or 27/1888 MO,
…………………………….d. 03/15/1908 MO *
………..4 Charles (William?) HOLMES, b. 05/31/1853 MO,
…………………………….d. 12/07/1861
………..4 Julia HOLMES, b. 05/19/1855 MO, d. 09/16/1881
………..4 Margaret Ann HOLMES, b. 06/23/1857 MO,
…………………………….d. 07/03/1890,  Peter PRATTE*
………..4 Flora Mary HOLMES, b. 04/27/1859 MO, d. 12/15/1867
………..4 Robert Blackwell HOLMES Jr, b. 03/02/1861,
…………………………….d. 03/08/1861
………..4 Maud HOLMES, b. 03/30/1862, d. 04/07/1862
………..4 Clara Lucinda HOLMES, b. 06/12/1868 MO, d. 11/10/1896,
…………………………….m. Henry  PRATTE*
 
………3 Richard Madden HOLMES, b. 01/20/1824 MO, d. 01/19/1850 MO,
…………………………….m. Dec. 10, 1845 MO by Rev. John McFarland
……….+ Rachael HOLLOMAN (daug. Allan W. Holloman and 1st wife),
…………………………….b. 01/28/1828 MO, d. 07/08/1883 TX
………..4 Mary HOLMES, b. abt. 1846 MO, d. bef, 1850
………..4 William H. HOLMES, b. abt. 1847 MO, d. 1857
………..4 Allan W. HOLMES, b. abt. 1849 MO, d. aft. 1870

 * cemetery info from “Old Stone Church” Cemetery, near Coffman,
MO in Ste. Genevieve Co.

 

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  1. Are there any Haddocks left in St Gen County Mo?

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