Historical Buildings: Introduction

More info as well as pictures of these will follow in other articles/pages, but for now, here is a growing list.

City of Ste. Genevieve:

  • Joseph Millard, 1805 – private
    Image
  • Vital St. Gemme – private – built about 1798
  • Pierre Dorlac – private – built about 1790
  • Bequette-Ribeau – private – built about 1778 by Jean Baptiste St. Gemme de Beauvais (builder of the Amoureaux house)
  • Amoureaux – on tour
  • Green Tree Tavern – abt 1790
  • Dr. Aaron Elliot – private
  • Louis Ratte Labruyere (also known as Hoffman or Ratte-Hoffman house) – private – 1784
  • Francois Valle Jr. – private – abt 1784
  • Francois Valle Jr. – private – abt 1785
  • Valle Stone House – private
  • Jean Baptiste Bossier – 1807
  • Sebastian Burtcher – private
  • Bolduc House – on tour – 1785
  • Bolduc-LeMeilleur – on tour
  • Antoine O’Neil – private
  • Linden House
  • Post Office 1831 – private
  • Jean Bte. Valle – 1785Image Image
  • Vital Beauvais – on tour – Built in the 1700’s (1775?) by Vital Beauvais; he also owned the land in front of the house (on what is now Main St) to the river, which then wasn’t so very far.
  • Joseph Bogy (or Doc Bogy) – private
    Image
  • Jesse B. Robbins – private
  • Felix Valle – state-owned
    Image
  • DeFour Store Bldg – private – 1790
  • Theophilus DuFour House – private – 1790-95
  • Shaw House & Fur Trading Post – on tour? – 1790

    Image
  • Sen. Lewis Linn – private
    Image
  • First Court House 1821 & old Jail – open
    Image
  • Old Brick House – open (restaurant) – 1790
    Image
  • Marie LaPorte – private – 1790
  • The Old Hotel – now apartment buildings
  • Okenfuss Bldg – now businesses
  • Roy Bldg – now businesses
  • Huck House – private
    Image
  • Old Ice House – private
  • Joseph Seraphin – private – 1795
  • Gregoire – private – 1830
  • Maison Guibourd-Valle – (or Jacques Guibourd) on tour – 1785
    Image Image
  • Dr. Fenwick – private
  • Old Academy – private
  • Image Image Image
  • Aubuchon – private – 1785
  • Joseph Govereau – private – 1790-95
  • Leon Yealy – private
  • Jules Petrequin Home – now K of C Hall
    Image
  • Jean Bte. Hubardeau – private
  • Simon Hubardeau – private – 1789
  • Dr. Charles Hertich – now Bed &
    Breakfast
    abt 1850
  • Dr. Anton Klemmer – private
  • Felix Rozier Home – now
    Inn
    Ste. Gemme
    1848
    Image
  • Oberle buildings – private
  • Ste. Genevieve Museum
    – open
    Image
  • “Store building” – private
  • Bertha Doerge – private
  • Michael Placet – private – 1791
  • LeCompte Bld – now apartments, private
  • Old Mill – now owned by MFA
  • Louis Delcommune – private
    Image
  • Josiah Millard – private
  • Jokerst – private
  • August Aubuchon Jr – private – 1795
  • Jacob Yearly – private
  • Francois Valle III – now the
    Southern
    Hotel
    1790’s
  • Louis Caron – private – 1785
  • Joseph Caron – private – 1785
  • Antoine Aubuchon – private
  • Dr. Benjamin Shaw House – open, now Interpretive Center – 1819
  • Kiel-Schwent – private
  • Jean Paul Robert – private – 1797
  • John Birke – private – 1797
  • Antoine Lalumondiere – private/abandoned
    Image
  • 1830’s Thomure house – private/abandoned
    Image
  • Louis LaSource – private
  • Chadwell – private (Also known as LaSource-Labruyere, 1790??)
  • Thomure – private
  • Ziegler House
    Image
  • Francois Bernier – private – 1790
  • Bernier – private
  • Jean Baptiste LaRose – private
  • Unknown – (Is under restoration)
    Image Image

County of Ste. Genevieve:

  • Unknown – NOT in city limits – private –
    1846

    Image

More pictures:

http://carrollscorner.net/SitesSte.GenCo_SteGenevieve01.htm


This is in no way a complete list!!!!

122 Years With the Ste. Genevieve Herald
The Ste. Genevieve Herald
April 30, 2003
100 Years Ago – 1903
Work on the new Boverie store building has been going on
briskly, the bricklayers bringing up their work to the second floor
on the main building by Wednesday noon and the carpenters putting in
the iron front and joists of the upper floor by Thursday.  Some
of the iron pieces that go to make the front, weight nearly a half
ton.

50 Years Ago – 1953
The large, rectangular, electrically illuminated canopy that
jutted out the entrance side of the Orris Theater for many years was
replaced last week by an elaborate neon sign in the shape of an
obtuse triangle which extends out over the sidewalk to the edge of
the street.

2 Comments

  1. I used to visit Womack every spring and summer with my Grandparents on their farm. My sister and I would
    visit the old CrossRoads School for a couple days. What happened to it? I came back to the area, just
    for memory’ sake, and saw a new school. A few years back I went down again, and that was gone. I am
    just curious, as I have many sweet memories of that area. Also, the road has been paved, the creek that
    ran through my grandparents land has been directed through a pipe. It was so beautiful to watch the creek
    run over the rocks. I took my grandkids down there and let them wade in the running water on the road.
    This was Old Jackson Road, Star Rte. 1. The house my grandparents built is gone too, and over run with
    weeds. Even with the changes, our whole family, cousins and all, loved the stream and red dirt. Wonderful
    sweet memories. It’s the place I go in my mind when things get rough.
    The church has moved, the little store is gone, and so much building going on. I pray Womack doesn’t
    change much more. Can you please tell me what happened to the above buildings? The area has so
    much magic for all of us that live in big cities.
    Thank you so much,
    Roberta Lee Schroeder

  2. Author

    Hi Roberta – I’m afraid I don’t know the answers to your questions but maybe in time someone else will come by with some information.
    Change isn’t always good, huh? I hate to see the old buildings and landmarks disappear, too. That’s one reason why I went all over my great-grandparents’ property and took as many photos as I could, shortly before my great-aunt sold the place. But it will always live on in my memory.

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